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Topic: New Industrial Revolution in America< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 12:08 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Think how much further along on this promising path we could be if the money wasted in Iraq had been spent on government funded R&E, and on improving the US infrastructure to support a new industrial revolution??

Still very promising as we begin to pull out of Bush Depression.

"Manufacturing is undergoing a change that is every bit as significant as the introduction of interchangeable parts or the production line, maybe even more so," says Michael Idelchik, who heads up advanced technologies at GE's global research lab, located about 15 minutes away from the battery plant. "The future is not going to be about stretched-out global supply chains connected to a web of distant giant factories. It's about small, nimble manufacturing operations using highly sophisticated new tools and new materials."

There's no question that a coinage like the New Industrial Revolution sounds magisterial, given the profound impact that the original Industrial Revolution had not just on business but on living standards around the world. And there's also no question that for all the big talk and big forecasts, many things will go on being produced using techniques that were all but perfected long ago.

But the big label is far from unwarranted. The upheaval, still in an early stage, is accelerating now thanks to the convergence of a number of trends: the low cost and accessibility of Big Data associated with cloud computing; the plummeting cost of electronic sensors, microprocessors and other components that can be used to make machines more adept; and advances in software and communications technology that make it possible to manage manufacturing with a whole new level of precision and enable new forms of collaboration.

A new wave of supercheap electronic sensors, microprocessors and other components means that facilities like Mr. Hislop's need almost no human help to do their jobs and can collect huge amounts of data along the way. Managers can get instant alerts about potential problems or study the numbers to find ways to boost efficiency and improve performance.


http://online.wsj.com/news....4722382

Be sure to read the whole article, and especially the Made in America statistical chart.  I don't know how to copy it here, but it is certainly thought provoking.

48% of large manufacturers are planning to return production to the US.

That will pull us all the way out of the recent depression.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 12:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There is a convergence of some pretty significant mega trends:
1) shale fracking / cheap oil and gas making the US the world's largest oil producer by 2015
2) rising labor costs in Asia
3) technology, namely 3D printing and nano-engineering
4) a more volatile climate with the ability to disrupt trans-global supply chains
5) currency impacts of differing central bank policies along with increasing capital mobility

Unfortunately our public schools continue to crank out students who lack the STEM skills to benefit fully from these changes.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 5:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey....somebody has to sell the french fries

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 6:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Get your application in Bab.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 6:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's an interesting read. I can't disagree with it at all, but I'm curious how labor will factor into the equation. As technology improves, less people with minimal education will be needed. Most manufacturing will be automated, requiring less people. Skilled technicians will be needed to maintain the equipment, but does our education system support this?

I used to work in a semi-conductor factory. Every year, we needed less and less workers as a lot of the functions were replaced by robots. Also, I worked for a compressor company whose manufacturing facility was essentially "lights out," meaning almost no humans touched the product during production.

With the constant influx of unskilled labor, i.e. illegal imigration, low school standards, etc... what will we do to educate people to support the second revolution?


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 10:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Now you are beginning to understand why quality education for every child in America is a top priority for the nation of the future.

If top teachers were paid the same, or more, than top engineers our education woes would be solved in one generation.

when will there be the political will, with attendant funding, to make that kind of change happen.

Think about a world where we invested as much in education, especially early childhood education, as we invest in the Defense Department!

Early childhood education is actually more important for the national security of country in the future than the Defense Department, but we don't seem to have the sense as a society to recognize that.

But the more affluent parents who do realize that fact are the ones who are raising the kids who will do just fine in that new economy.  My grandchildren have access to information, technology and educational tools of all kinds that I never dreamed of, and they can use all of them skillfully.

What a country!


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2014, 11:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wwwest @ Apr. 16 2014, 10:27 pm)
QUOTE
Now you are beginning to understand why quality education for every child in America is a top priority for the nation of the future.

If top teachers were paid the same, or more, than top engineers our education woes would be solved in one generation.

when will there be the political will, with attendant funding, to make that kind of change happen.

Think about a world where we invested as much in education, especially early childhood education, as we invest in the Defense Department!

Early childhood education is actually more important for the national security of country in the future than the Defense Department, but we don't seem to have the sense as a society to recognize that.

But the more affluent parents who do realize that fact are the ones who are raising the kids who will do just fine in that new economy.  My grandchildren have access to information, technology and educational tools of all kinds that I never dreamed of, and they can use all of them skillfully.

What a country!

Beginning to understand? I'm very aware, thank you. Life in private, DoDD and public schools has given me a unique perspective on our education system.

Think of a country where people earned their own retirement so we could pay more towards education...
Think of a country where people were educated on firearms...
Think of a country where people were educated on science...
Think of a country where people were educated rather than legislated...

You're right, what a country! I've seen many and ours is amazing.  

I agree we spend too much on offense, but not enough on defense...


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 17 2014, 8:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BillBab @ Apr. 16 2014, 4:18 pm)
QUOTE
Hey....somebody has to sell the french fries

True.

And go back in European history as the Industrial Revolution developed. Somebody has to be a "man of leisure".

In that era, being a "man of leisure" was considered a worthy way to spend life - if you could afford it.

But in more modern times, FDR's 1930's, introduction of the 40 hour workweek created a big surge in labour demand because it replaced the sunup until sundown work hours of the early 1930's labour force. And that was the idea behind the 40 hour workweek. Workers who worked 12 hours per day for 6 days a week, 72 hours a week, now worked only about half as much. The 40 hour workweek almost doubled the demand for workers overnight. That helped to end the 1930's Depression.

So what is wrong with going to a 28 hour, or 30 hour workweek?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2014, 3:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well there's the tech revolution (automation, robotics, 3D printers becoming 3D manufacturing ... may take awhile tho).  Also China wants more pay and is becoming aware that pollution is poisoning their farmland China - 20% of our farmland is polluted (Marketwatch - part of the WSJ family, accessed April 2014).  They've been reducing their US bond purchases, so not sure their politburo wants to start increasing their purchases of US bonds again (plus bonds of other large wheat producing nations like Argentina, ... and all the economic funness going on down there).  The idea was always they would start their own consumer society anyways.  Hard to say what their growing system wants to do but U.S. business interests grew Red China so they need to eat their liver on this one (Chinese politicians and especially if the tiff between China, Japan, Vietnam, the Philippines, etc.. blows up, along with many container ships.  "Ain't my problem, Dumb-bunnys...").  India is fairly volatile going from business friendly to business unfriendly at the drop of a hat.  Russia .. ain't happening.  Could be a good time for US workers for the first time since 1970.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2014, 4:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wwwest @ Apr. 16 2014, 12:08 pm)
QUOTE
Think how much further along on this promising path we could be if the money wasted in Iraq had been spent on government funded R&E, and on improving the US infrastructure to support a new industrial revolution??

Still very promising as we begin to pull out of Bush Depression.

"Manufacturing is undergoing a change that is every bit as significant as the introduction of interchangeable parts or the production line, maybe even more so," says Michael Idelchik, who heads up advanced technologies at GE's global research lab, located about 15 minutes away from the battery plant. "The future is not going to be about stretched-out global supply chains connected to a web of distant giant factories. It's about small, nimble manufacturing operations using highly sophisticated new tools and new materials."

There's no question that a coinage like the New Industrial Revolution sounds magisterial, given the profound impact that the original Industrial Revolution had not just on business but on living standards around the world. And there's also no question that for all the big talk and big forecasts, many things will go on being produced using techniques that were all but perfected long ago.

But the big label is far from unwarranted. The upheaval, still in an early stage, is accelerating now thanks to the convergence of a number of trends: the low cost and accessibility of Big Data associated with cloud computing; the plummeting cost of electronic sensors, microprocessors and other components that can be used to make machines more adept; and advances in software and communications technology that make it possible to manage manufacturing with a whole new level of precision and enable new forms of collaboration.

A new wave of supercheap electronic sensors, microprocessors and other components means that facilities like Mr. Hislop's need almost no human help to do their jobs and can collect huge amounts of data along the way. Managers can get instant alerts about potential problems or study the numbers to find ways to boost efficiency and improve performance.


http://online.wsj.com/news....4722382

Be sure to read the whole article, and especially the Made in America statistical chart.  I don't know how to copy it here, but it is certainly thought provoking.

48% of large manufacturers are planning to return production to the US.

That will pull us all the way out of the recent depression.

Yes........if only the democrats would have passed all of Bush's proposals and cooperated with him.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2014, 2:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great news for corporate America! Manufacturing returning to the US, but without the profit limiting cost of employing more Americans. Hopefully, the corporate sponsorship for immigration reform will finally come to fruition, and they can just insource the limited but required employees. Why waste money on education when we can just get the best and brightest at a vastly reduced cost via H-1Bs.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2014, 5:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

China is turning out engineers at a much higher rate than the US.  If you think those manufacturing jobs are coming back, you are dreaming.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2014, 8:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(markinOhio @ Apr. 22 2014, 12:50 pm)
QUOTE
Great news for corporate America! Manufacturing returning to the US, but without the profit limiting cost of employing more Americans. Hopefully, the corporate sponsorship for immigration reform will finally come to fruition,..

The new manufacturing will be more automated I'm sure requiring a community college educated computer operator.(~$21/hour).  Those will support service jobs since it wouldn't be the USA without 35 different cheese"burger" joints within a 10 mile radius.   Long ways off but even that may change if 3D printing intergrates with micro-manufacturing - download a design (free or pay for one copy), go to a specialty shop in a strip mall where your custom item can be finalized with the appropriate designer.  It will even work on y'all's custom Hello Kitty grips for your next assault rifle!

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