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Topic: The Changing Face Of Police In The US, No Longer Part Of Community< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2014, 6:25 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It was easy to see that the Feds were trying to set the stage for a Waco or Ruby Ridge type massacre at Bundy's ranch in Nevada.

Why? Was it to use all these new military toys and see how efficiently snipers and helicopter gunners can kill?

There is a new breed of police in today's America. "Military-style units from government agencies are wreaking havoc on non-violent citizens."

From The United States Of SWAT :

“Law-enforcement agencies across the U.S., at every level of government, have been blurring the line between police officer and soldier,” journalist Radley Balko writes in his 2013 book Rise of the Warrior Cop. “The war on drugs and, more recently, post-9/11 antiterrorism efforts have created a new figure on the U.S. scene: the warrior cop — armed to the teeth, ready to deal harshly with targeted wrongdoers, and a growing threat to familiar American liberties.”

The proliferation of paramilitary federal SWAT teams inevitably brings abuses that have nothing to do with either drugs or terrorism. Many of the raids they conduct are against harmless, often innocent, Americans who typically are accused of non-violent civil or administrative violations.

Many veteran law-enforcement figures have severe qualms about the turn police work is taking. One retired veteran of a large metropolitan police force told me: “I was recently down at police headquarters for a meeting. Coincidently, there was a promotion ceremony going on and the SWAT guys looked just like members of the Army, except for the police shoulder patches. Not an image I would cultivate. It leads to a bad mindset.”
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2014, 6:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Get your MRAP here!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news....for-war


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2014, 8:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It started in the 1970's with Los Angeles SWAT against leftists, but gained steamed after the (again) Los Angeles Northridge incident (1993) when those bank robbers outgunned the normal LAPD with their AK-47's.  Most dept now scatter SWAT throughout their force as not to keep a paid force idle.  9/11 just accelerated an accelerating trend.  

Law enforcement should have a SWAT ability since there's more military style semi-autos in circulation, IMHO , but when SWAT gets called to action should be when there's a threat that deserves it.  

When it gets deployed is why we pay these police supervisors, judges, and politico's the big bucks to get it right.   If they screw it up and lose in court when sued (increasingly by the family but sometimes the accused), the county insurance will pay but if the award goes beyond that insurance, ... the taxpayer picks up the tab.   Not SWAT, but one New Mexico county locked a DUI case up, somehow forgot he was in solitary for a year, lost in court, and I calculated the uninsured tab at $37 per taxpayer.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2014, 9:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TDale @ Apr. 19 2014, 5:50 am)
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Well, you gotta have something nice for the forth of july parade other than the old beat up 1956 fire truck.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2014, 11:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I disagree that law enforcement is no longer part of the community.  In fact I think just the opposite.  Over the past couple of decades many local law enforcement agencies have implemented community based policing programs which work towards operating more closely with the citizens. And the main reason cops have upped the game with their tactics and equipment is the threats against them have increased significantly.

And I disagree with your contention that the feds were trying for another Waco or Ruby Ridge in Nevada.  First, all three of these incidents were entirely different.  Second, the feds showed exceptional restraint and good judgment in Nevada by backing down from this potentially volatile encounter.  If they were looking for a blood bath as you suggest, they had the perfect scenario for it, but they chose to de-escalate.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2014, 11:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I gotta agree that the Bundy incident was nearly the opposite of the Waco and Ruby Ridge incidents.  The feds backed down rather than escalating.  I generally agree with the new approach.
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