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Topic: Adding calories without too much weight?, hungry teen< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 1:55 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi everyone!

My husband, 14 year old daughter and I just completed our first 3 night trip, and my daughter was hungry almost all the time.  I need to find a way to keep her full, but our food weight was already high (for us newbies).

We packed all Backpackers Pantry and Mountain House foods for this trip, one full pack for each of us (says 2 servings, but from what I read that was not really accurate).

She would be full at the end of each meal, but be starving again within the hour.  For snacks we had nuts and dried fruit.  I don't want to pack more nuts, because they were one of the heavier parts of our food kit.

This is a girl that is all muscle - she dances 6 days a week - and eats tons at home too.

So far, I have come up with the Justins PB and Chocolate Almond Butter packets - 1 of each per day and olive oil packets - one stirred into each of her meals which would hopefully help provide some staying power.

Does anyone have any ideas for lightweight snacks that would stick to her a bit?  Or meals that might stay better?  The Backpackers Pantry Pad Thai at almost 1000 calories seemed to do a good job,  :;): but that was considerably higher in cals than the other packets I have seen.

Also - I had the idea of adding some calories to her water bottle, but she does not like gatorade type drinks and the only other single serving mixes I can find are "diet".  Am I stuck pouring lemonade powder into a ziploc at home, or does anyone know of a single serve option with sugar?

How do you keep a teen full on the trail?  :D
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 3:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What was your menu on the trail? Did you have a full breakfast?

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 3:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

We had a full breakfast - she had a full pack of Backpackers Pantry Granola with Bananas each day.  

For lunch either Mountain House Chicken Salad with tortillas or Backpackers Pantry Black Bean and Corn Salad.

Dinner was Backpackers Pantry Shepard's Stew with Potatoes, Rice with Chicken and the Pad Thai.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 4:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

not sure if this will help, but when I am in the mtns, my body really needs carbs.  If out for 2 nights, I pre make pbj sammys and keep them in a disposable tupper ware and eat them for lunch.  I also eat a lot of power bars and cliff bars along the way.  She may need carbs more than calories?  I just know what keeps me going.  My brother busted my beans on one trip cause of the way I ate and he bonked right after we ran into a bear and he wanted to stop and eat a pbj.  I suggested we hike a few more feet and then eat.  I like to graze all day.  Sometimes at dinner I may not even be that hungry.  Especially if it's hot out.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 6:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Skip the pre-made stuff and learn freezer bag cooking.  You can make your own meals better and cheaper.

Does she like olive oil?  I plan my menus so I can add it to every meal.  Pure calories and satiation.

Mookies.  Google it.  Three as a snack will keep me walking for hours.

Nuts are ideal because of the calories per ounce.

Barilla three-cheese tortellini.  When you buy it, it's cooked and dried.  When you rehydrate it and add pesto and parmesan it will satisfy anyone and has long lasting effect.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 6:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Olive oil can be added to just about any freeze dried meal to boost calories. I buy these:

http://www.backpackerspantry.com/Invento....tegory=

Their cheese adds both flavor and calories:

http://www.backpackerspantry.com/Invento....tegory=

I used to add wheat germ to my breakfast foods back when I cooked breakfast.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 7:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You should try baking food it is more satisfying than the freeze dried stuff and still has lots of calories and protein. I make a 6 inch pizza that has 800 calories and 25 grams of protein and it will fill you up and last. I normally will have 2 of them for dinner. The ingredients weigh about 10 oz for the 2 pizzas. they are the flour, yeast, sugar, salt, spices tomato paste comes in a tube like toothpaste, pepperoni, cheese, dehydrated mushrooms, onions, bell peppers.

The kids always love when you can have pizza in the wilderness. I also make banana nut bread, blueberry muffins, biscuits and gravy and many more. I love it and so do the kids. It gives them something to look forward to other than just add water and eat.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 11:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Chia seed is something Ive been wanting to check out.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 12:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Tortillas and pb. I normally bring 10-20 tortillas and a 1lb jar of pb. I also like to just eat spoonfuls of pb.
Spread pb on middle of tortilla fold 2 sides into the middle and then roll them up.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 11:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thank you for all of the suggestions!  I'm going to show her this thread and let her pick out what will work for her.

I did look into FBC and I am impressed.  I think we will go that way from now on.  I think there is a chance that "real" food will hold her better, and I can always make her portions a bit heavier on the carbs.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 12:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

We did some experimenting this summer with adding protein to our breakfasts and found that it really helped, especially for me and Eldest Son (we two are the ones most likely to want to eat again an hour after breakfast).  I got some shelf-stable bacon, which is light though a bit bulky (can't repackage as it will spoil once open) and some MH scrambled eggs with meat.  That definitely helped.

The boys also nosh lots of beef jerky and Slim Jims on the trail at snack breaks.

Carbs are important but in my experience it's fats and protein that keep me from being hungry so soon.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 2:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RebeccaD @ Aug. 29 2012, 12:39 pm)
QUOTE
Carbs are important but in my experience it's fats and protein that keep me from being hungry so soon.

That's what I'm thinking as well. For the long burn, protein is the way to go.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 6:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As several others have mentioned, getting away from the freeze dried meals will help.  One of their many problems is that they contain far too much salt.

I experimented with this recipe the last time I was out.  Yummy!  The bars sound very odd since the base is beans, but they are very satisfying.  

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/homemade-energy-bar-recipe/


Lots of ideas here:

http://www.trailcooking.com/

And here:

http://www.onepanwonders.com/

The first one was written by Sarbar and the second one my Dicentra.  You will find loads of info from both of them in this forum.

I agree 100% with adding protein to breakfast.

As a dancer she likely burns more calories, per day, at home than you or your husband.  Add growth to that and throw in the exercise of backpacking and I suspect she needs 4,000 - 6,000 calories a day while backpacking.   And honestly that could be low.  

For quick fixes during the day, candy bars that are not likely to melt (Payday is one) are great.

Good luck!   Feeding a teen on the trail is a challenge.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 31 2012, 9:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lots of variables here ....

You didn't mention your pace or the terrain.  Understanding the number of (extra) calories burned by a hike is one of the keys to successfully fueling up.

You also didn't mention anything about your daughter's typical food intake - kcal/day, types of foods, etc.  Does she typically feel hungry during a "normal" day?  Understanding her base metabolic rate and caloric needs is also critical to understanding what she needs on the trail

Another point to mention is that many times the first world problem that we perceive as hunger is often psychological more than physical.  True hunger is a sensation in the throat and mouth.  You didn't describe your daughter's symptoms so it's hard to know for sure what was happening.

With more information, we can provide better suggestions.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 05 2012, 9:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like tortillas with PB and Nutella, and if it's a short trip, bananas and granola wrapped in there too.  I am also addicted to honey roasted peanuts and almonds.  I also squeeze in olive oil into my dinner meals sometimes, which you already mentioned that you do.  Good luck to you!  Sounds like you have a very healthy teen, which is great!
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 05 2012, 9:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A hunting license could be a solution.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 22 2013, 12:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I wanted to come back to this thread and add what worked for our family with our teen eater on the trail. . .

Because of time commitments (mine) we did not try Freezer Bag Cooking this year, we stuck to freeze dried.  We seemed to do OK with 3 meals (2 servings per meal for her) provided we had Justins Nut Butters available (1-2 a day), a stinger waffle, a stinger bar, and some Hersheys drops for her to snack on.  We also packed dessert for most nights to make sure she was climbing into her sleeping bag satiated.  

It's only fair to add that when I posted this thread, she was growing, and this past summer she seems to have reached her full height, so that may make some difference.  It may be that last year this would not have been enough.

I hope this helps some folks that plan for teens on the trail - they really do need more to keep them going. . .
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 23 2013, 1:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Most efficient way to add calories is with fat, and it sticks with you.  Next best is protien, then carbs, which are going to weigh more.

Supplement with bacon bars, and very dense chocolate.  Those are what the big wall climbers and peak climbers use to get the energy and strength needed in a lightweight food.

Just as a supplement when the regular meals don't last long enough.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2013, 1:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Similar to what wwwest said, I like to use chocolate with a high cocoa percentage (90% for me). It has a lot of calories per gram, something like 6 or 7 if I remember correctly.

Adding olive oil to meals is a good idea too. Similarly, coconut oil goes well on certain dishes too, like oatmeal, depending on the toppings, or stir-fry type dinners. Fats have 9 calories per gram, whereas proteins and carbs are 4-5 calories per gram.


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2013, 5:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ghee. Pure fat, shelf stable, delicious. Buy it, if you want, but it's easy to make. If you do make it, use sweet (unsalted) butter. I saw a docu about a guy making a solo bid for the South Pole. He ate butter, by the bar, and added it to everything else he ate. Butter isn't shelf stable, but clarifying it (making ghee) removes the proteins that make it susceptible to spoilage.

Lard, too, goes well in rehydrated refried beans. Me and mine don't eat beef; lard is clarified pork fat. When I make a TVP dish, I'll add a teaspoon to the mix, as well. Gives it a nice mouth-feel and that good ol' American meaty shine.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 03 2013, 10:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There is no easy answer.  Fat = weight.  For energy you can't get more efficient than pure sugar, and you know how much that weights.  Pasta (try corn pasta) and rice are pretty dense in the carb category.

Lentils have decent carbs and protein and dehydrate nicely as well.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 04 2013, 4:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Fat = weight

This seems to be a popular misconception, not sure why.

One gram of fat has 9 calories, whereas one gram of protein or carb has 3-5 calories, depending on the source.

So, you get more than twice as much energy for one gram of fat.

But, the good news does not stop there!  Fat is degested and released much more slowly than carbs, and a little more slowly than most proteins.

If you want quick energy, that will soon be gone, have surgar, bread and pasta.

If you want long lasting energy that will carry you through the day, eat fat and protein.

And good, rich chocolate is a great combo of fat and sugar, so you get some of both, plus it tastes great and really satisfys the craving.

Here is a chart:

Fat: 1 gram = 9 calories
Protein: 1 gram = 4 calories
Carbohydrates: 1 gram = 4 calories
Alcohol: 1 gram = 7 calories

Protein: Foods such as meat, eggs, and beans consist of large molecules of protein that must be digested by enzymes before they can be used to build and repair body tissues. An enzyme in the juice of the stomach starts the digestion of swallowed protein. Further digestion of the protein is completed in the small intestine. Here, several enzymes from the pancreatic juice and the lining of the intestine carry out the breakdown of huge protein molecules into small molecules called amino acids. These small molecules can be absorbed from the hollow of the small intestine into the blood and then be carried to all parts of the body to build the walls and other parts of cells.

Fats: Fat molecules are a rich source of energy for the body. The first step in digestion of a fat is to dissolve it into the watery content of the intestinal cavity. The bile acids produced by the liver act as natural detergents to dissolve fat in water and allow the enzymes to break the large fat molecules into smaller molecules, some of which are fatty acids and cholesterol. The bile acids combine with the fatty acids and cholesterol and help these molecules to move into the cells of the mucosa. In these cells the small molecules are formed back into large molecules, most of which pass into vessels (called lymphatics) near the intestine. These small vessels carry the reformed fat to the veins of the chest, and the blood carries the fat to storage depots in different parts of the body.


http://www.nutristrategy.com/digestion.htm


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