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Topic: Re-heating in a pot?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 24 2013, 9:17 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My question is regarding re-heating food in a pot, not cooking. What are some methods you have found to work?

My thinking tells me that indirect heat is what is needed = lower temp. One theory I am thinking of is boiling water and putting the food in a zip-loc bag, then dunking the bag in the boiling water.

I didn't have the supplies to do that this weekend so what I did was wrap the pot with aluminum foil and set close to the camp fire. The thought was the foil would protect the pot from both direct heat and soot, but with holes in the foil the pot still turned black (need to check that next time, or even double wrap the pot).

Are there any other ideas?


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 24 2013, 11:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Aluminum foil probably won't help, as it's too thin and likely will allow for unimpeded heat transmission.

Have you tried a vacuum bagger (if the food is to be cooked at home)? The ziplock bags may not be reliable enough.

Double boiler.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 2:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd go for the double boiler if you're reheating. Fill a pot a third with water. Put it over the fire then fit on it a smaller pot with the food you want to reheat. Works if you don't want direct heat on the food. But then you'll be needing an extra pot.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 5:51 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm looking for a trail-friendly/light-weight option. 2 pots aren't going to work.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 4:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

for camp fire, dig a trench between 2 sets of stones next to the fire. and set the pot on it.
your heat comes from the side and a little on the bottom.
Rotate every couple of minutes, or stir frequently.
To speed things up. rotate coals into and out of your little trench that you have dug.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 5:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What are you reheating?

When I have leftover one pot meals, I'll just add a little extra water and reheat over the stove, stirring often.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 7:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm confused.  What are you trying to re-heat?  And is there no stove in this scenerio?

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 8:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This past weekend I cooked up a chicken cacetore dish, tomato-based sauce, chicken, and veggies. I ate half the first night and put the rest in a zip-loc bag.

I did have a stove - MSR Simmerlite. I just find that the stove, even on a low setting, is good for boiling water/higher-temp cooking than low-heat work.

The fire pit that was at the camp site had a metal grate that flipped up over the ring so that is what I set my stove on close to the fire to do my heating, stirring a lot. That won't be much of an option in the back country though = no metal to set the pot on (rocks maybe).


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2013, 12:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If I'm hiking through territory where fires are permitted and practical, I typically carry some small, cheap, light grill to balance precariously between three rocks. I'll build a small fire ("squaw wood') directly outside the grill and poke coals under the grill or add wood as needed under whatever I'm cooking. Great for mountain trout to have a small grill available.

I wish they could all be California grills.

BTW, perishable food (i.e. cooked chicken) should not be kept between 40 and 140 degrees F for more than four hours. Sounds like it might be food-borne disease waiting to happen.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2013, 6:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What is a California grill?

This weekend the challenge was keeping water and all from freezing. I think having my left-overs too warm was the least of my worries  :) A more mild temp trip would have that as more of a consideration.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2013, 9:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KC8QVO @ Mar. 26 2013, 6:47 am)
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What is a California grill?

A Beach Boys song.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2013, 1:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KC8QVO @ Mar. 25 2013, 8:49 pm)
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This past weekend I cooked up a chicken cacetore dish, tomato-based sauce, chicken, and veggies. I ate half the first night and put the rest in a zip-loc bag.

I did have a stove - MSR Simmerlite. I just find that the stove, even on a low setting, is good for boiling water/higher-temp cooking than low-heat work.

Oh, OK.  That's probably due to your pot, not your stove.

I still think you should be able to reheat your leftovers in a pot on the stove.  Add water, turn down the stove as low as it will go, cover with lid.  You'll need to stir so that the contents will heat evenly.  The extra water will steam off as you cook.

It helps if the chicken pieces are smaller.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 26 2013, 6:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I find that I end up burning the stuff at the bottom of the pot when direct over a stove. That is how I cook everything up - instead of using a pan I'll use the pot directly to simmer veggies in olive oil. Then goes the chicken and finally the tomato sauces (diced tomatoes and tomato paste). I usually have to scrape the bottom of the pot a few times as I stir.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 5:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Eat it for breakfast before you take off and don't worry about spoiling chicken fermenting in your pack. ;-)

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 9:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Mar. 27 2013, 5:43 am)
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Eat it for breakfast before you take off and don't worry about spoiling chicken fermenting in your pack. ;-)

Depends on the overnight temperature.

On our mid-winter trips into Algonquin, we'd pack on the sled things like ice cream, premixed uncooked scrambled eggs frozen in Nalgene bottles, and frozen, uncooked venison. Breakfast for the next day was put in your sleeping bag at night to thaw. Lunch goes inside your parka after breakfast, dinner goes into the parka after lunch.

At more civilized temperatures, ignoring basic food safety measures, however, can make for a $hitty trip--literally. Four hours between forty and one-forty works for me.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 1:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(waterdog @ Mar. 27 2013, 9:45 am)
QUOTE
At more civilized temperatures, ignoring basic food safety measures, however, can make for a $hitty trip--literally. Four hours between forty and one-forty works for me.

Personally, I think this advice is sort of like food producers/manufacturers' expiration dates.

I bring the previous night's leftovers for lunch to work every day; been doing it forever.  I pack it in a covered container around 6:30 in the morning and it sits on my desk all morning, sometimes until mid-afternoon.  Sometimes I throw it in the microwave to reheat, sometimes I don't.  I've never gotten sick.  Ever.  I also pack lunches, chicken wings, etc. for ball games, all-day tournaments, what-not all the time.  Imo, nobody's going to get sick from eating cooked chicken that's been sitting at room-temp for 4 hours (or 8 hours, for that matter.)

Standards that restaurants and food providers have to adhere to is one thing (and it's a good thing), but it really doesn't mean that you'll get ill if you don't follow the same.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 5:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I guess being a health professional makes me more . . .cautious? . . . paranoid?

Those aren't just institutional recommendations, though. A lot of food-borne disease occurs at church functions, family cookouts, tailgate parties, etc.

To each his own, but I'm not eating yesterday's chicken tonight if it's been kept for 18 hours at 75 degrees Fahrenheit. I wouldn't feed it to my dogs, who consume all manner of evil.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 5:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ Mar. 27 2013, 1:29 pm)
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Standards that restaurants and food providers have to adhere to is one thing (and it's a good thing), but it really doesn't mean that you'll get ill if you don't follow the same.

No, it doesn't mean you will get food poisoning if you eat it--it means you might.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 27 2013, 5:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(waterdog @ Mar. 27 2013, 5:12 pm)
QUOTE

(TigerFan @ Mar. 27 2013, 1:29 pm)
QUOTE
Standards that restaurants and food providers have to adhere to is one thing (and it's a good thing), but it really doesn't mean that you'll get ill if you don't follow the same.

No, it doesn't mean you will get food poisoning if you eat it--it means you might.

Actually, I think it just means that you can't guarantee that it won't.  "Might" implies a greater likelihood.  JMO.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2013, 4:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Try using the Emberlit stove for cooking and reheating. [URL=http://www.emberlit.com]  It not only works great but it is fun to start and maintain a fire using it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 16 2013, 8:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

As long as you constantly check it and stir it and have enough water in the pot, plus have the stove on low it should reheat fine. Also look at using a heat diffuser so food doesn't burn.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 17 2013, 10:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've reheated chicken and other "non-sauced" food before by steaming it. I have an old smaller pot lid that fits inside the larger pot. Put about an inch of water in the large pot, then put the small lid in and then put the chicken or whatever on top of the lid. Cover the large pot and add enough heat to boil the water. The steam heats up the food quickly.

You may be able to make or buy a small round elevated grill that fits inside your pot. Then you can put the food on that to steam.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 17 2013, 2:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KC8QVO @ Mar. 25 2013, 8:49 pm)
QUOTE
This past weekend I cooked up a chicken cacetore dish, tomato-based sauce, chicken, and veggies. I ate half the first night and put the rest in a zip-loc bag.

How about placing the leftovers in a freezer bag and then placing the bag in boiling water? Sort of what I have done with the scouts with egg in a bag cooking.

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