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Topic: Typical list of cooking gear/food for 3-4 days, What do you bring?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 12:27 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi, new to this and just wondering what you guys specifically bring as far as food and cooking gear for 3 to 4 day trips.

Right now I have an MSR pocket rocket and the MSR Quick Solo system but I am thinking I will need more for me and the wife. What do you recommend?

Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 12:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Also, excuse my ignorance but I see a lot of ingredients (ex hummus) on backpacking recipes that are supposed to stay refrigerated. How do you keep everything from going bad on a hot trip?
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 12:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here is food for ~9 days in the northern Winds, then 6 more days in southern. Used super-cat stove as described in post. http://ckjournal.blogspot.com/2009/08/food-for-wyoming.html

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Thanks for the blog!
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 7:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My "cooking" usually consists only of boiling water for Enertia meals or similar FBC-style just-add-water foods. Everything but the dinner entree is something eaten cold.

The only cooking gear I carry is stove, fuel, pan, long-handled-spoon, light plastic measuring cup.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 9:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Trangia stove, kettle, long spoon, cozy.

Breakfast is grits or oatmeal, sometimes with dried fruit, always with coffee.

Lunch is usually a cold couscous salad of some kind or fresh fish if I'm lucky.

Dinner is usually one of sarbar's FBC meals with fresh fish if I'm lucky.

I don't plan my food around fishing but I fish when I can and eat accordingly.  I usually bring back food from a trip.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 10:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cbump @ May 20 2013, 12:39 am)
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Also, excuse my ignorance but I see a lot of ingredients (ex hummus) on backpacking recipes that are supposed to stay refrigerated. How do you keep everything from going bad on a hot trip?

You can buy instant hummus or dehydrate your own. I prefer the former simply because of laziness and that I'm dehydrating my other meals already.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 11:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Being as you are new, I will explain what we mean by FBC meals.  FBC is Freezer Bag Cooking.  Something like Ziplock freezer bags will hold boiling water.  Try it out in your kitchen sink, especially if you are going to use a cheaper brand.  It must be a freezer bag, as the storage ones are less sturdy and will leak.

Lots of dry ingredients can be assembled for a meal.  Most folks start out using Stove Top stuffing and adding something like a foil pack of chicken or tuna.  Or Instant mashed potatoes and a meat.  Instant rice comes in either white or brown these days.  Then they graduate to using recipes from here or here or here.  In camp, all we do is boil water, add it to the bag, and wait 8 minutes.  I carry a tea pot to boil my water, and a White Box stove.

 That is an alcohol stove, which you can learn all about on the inter webs.  Lots of stoves out there, but the PR you bought is good for starters.  More of a blow torch, so you cannot simmer anything, but good for boiling water.

I eat cold meals for breakfast and lunch, only needing hot water for my dinner.  I do not drink hot fluids of any flavor so that reduces the fuel and time spent heating water.  My meal planning for 5 days might look like this:

5 breakfasts of either peanut butter and sandwich thins, a mix of protein bars, or protein replacement meals. Lunches will be several of the following: jerky, mini waxed cheese, tortillas or flat bread, Justin's almond butter with honey, cashews, and M&Ms.  I mix and match as my mood suits me.

5 dinners will be mostly freeze-dried or home dehydrated meals from the following choices: Beef Stroganoff, Spaghetti, Chili Mac, Stove Top and Chicken, Knorr Sides Rice and a pack of tuna or salmon, or sometimes a soup mix from Bear Creek with some sort of meat tossed in at the last few minutes.

Even folks who use commercial freeze-dried meals will sometimes repackage them into zip locks, for space savings if they need to use a bear canister.  I am currently repackaging meals for 2 into smaller portions.  I get 5 meals out of 4 packages of Serves 2 meals.  I used to be able to eat the entire Serves 2 meal, but I am getting older.  


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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 1:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

ol-zeke ~ that is one of the best simple summaries of backpacking eating that I've seen.  And your reply is exceptionally kind and welcoming to a newbie.   Kudos to you!
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PostIcon Posted on: May 20 2013, 2:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cbump @ May 20 2013, 12:39 am)
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Also, excuse my ignorance but I see a lot of ingredients (ex hummus) on backpacking recipes that are supposed to stay refrigerated. How do you keep everything from going bad on a hot trip?

Look around these forums, you'll find that there are often shelf stable versions of many kinds of foods out there.  

Packitgourmet is one of my favorite sources - for full meals, or just ingredients.  You can look at their grocery page to get an idea of the types of things out there:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/General-Grocery.html


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PostIcon Posted on: May 21 2013, 12:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Zeke, that was a well-written post - that is perfect :)

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PostIcon Posted on: May 21 2013, 1:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You guys are great. Thanks for all the tips. This should get me going!
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PostIcon Posted on: May 21 2013, 8:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Some typical foods for me:

Breakfast:

Day one apple with peanut butter (small package) and trail mix

other days: usually some granola w/ powdered milk, or a couple granola bars/energy bars.

Lunch is often in 2-3 installments: candies, nuts, dried fruits, crackers, salami, hard cheese, cookies, etc.

Dinner for me is usually a dehydrated meal from Enertia Trail Foods, plus a some good dark chocolate for dessert.

If a trip goes as planned, you should always have some food leftover.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 21 2013, 11:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I look at it like...... I'm out for about 3 weeks thru the year, I want meals simple so I can fish or whatever, not cook.  Not fixing fancy or heavy items.  So all I am doing is boiling water.  I use a Optimus Crux and a 8oz canister lasts me almost nine days.  Dinners I go with freeze dried/dehydrated like Enertia or Mountain House, there are decent packs to eat.  Breakfast usually oatmeal, snacks are nuts, dried fruit, granola bars.  I figure 1.2 lbs per day for everything I eat.  Usually pack one extra FD meal pack for a just in case.

Has worked for me for 30 years......

However, pack what you would/WILL eat.    :)
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PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

thanks for all the great info here.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 10:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I dehydrate real food. Just finished tuna casserole and chili for the weekend meals.

I refuse to eat Mountain House, aka chemicals with a few calories added...


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PostIcon Posted on: May 22 2013, 10:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Cool. I'm not going to do all that though.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 10:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cbump @ May 22 2013, 10:46 pm)
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Cool. I'm not going to do all that though.

That's really funny.

If you are cooking dinner anyway, what is the difference between putting leftovers in a container, or on a tray into a dehydrator? NOTHING. Same effort.

There's very little that I do that requires tons of work.... I'm of the Sarbar persuasion. I do a little shopping for some things, I make things from items I pick up at the grocery store where I go anyway - no special trips to REI, no special orders from specialty catalogs, no extra expense. In the two weeks before a trip the dehydrator comes out and runs all night for a couple nights.

I like that I work less and think less about what I'm eating.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 23 2013, 10:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

^^This is what I was thinking.

Many people just dehydrate the leftovers from their meals they are eating on a normal basis.  Others will make a specific meal just for the dehydrator. For those that do not own a dehydrator, maybe it seems like work, but it really isn't.

When I backpack, it is often for 5-7 nights at a time. I like having meals already prepared so I can just gather them from storage, rather than needing to make them before leaving.  I often have 30 days worth in my basement.  


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 07 2013, 3:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have nothing to add. :)

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 07 2013, 8:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi YA AL:
Just thought I would throw this out.
My 3 day trip to the Palisade Glaciers in California.
The gear I brought to cook with was as follows:

MSR Simmerlite stove with 20oz Fuel
Bemco 7 inch Backpacker Oven with pans.

What was cooked:

Breakfast
Day 1
Biscuits and gravy
Day 2
Banana nut muffins

Lunch
Trail mix and home made jerky

Dinner
Day1
Chicken Enchiladas
Chocolate chip muffins for desert.

Day2
Pizza with onions mushrooms bell peppers and lots of cheese.
Also made fresh bread for the hike out (lunch)
Brownies for desert.

If you would like more info please let me know!
Thanks for your time!


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(AlmostThere @ May 23 2013, 10:30 am)
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If you are cooking dinner anyway, what is the difference between putting leftovers in a container, or on a tray into a dehydrator? NOTHING. Same effort.

Well, for starters, not everyone owns a dehydrator.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 13 2013, 4:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(buddero @ May 20 2013, 12:59 am)
QUOTE
Here is food for ~9 days in the northern Winds, then 6 more days in southern. Used super-cat stove as described in post. http://ckjournal.blogspot.com/2009/08/food-for-wyoming.html

That's a good post on food and dehydration.

BUT . . .  for a short 3 or 4 day trip I'd just take whatever you feel like as your food load will never be much.  In fact, I'd go ahead and take canned chili or refried beans or soups or whatever you feel like taking.  Cans won't kill you on such a short trip.

I know, I know, BLASPHEMER!!

Variety is important due to tongue boredom so take an avocado or watermelon or what the heck ever.  Don't worry about the weight.  When you have to carry 40 lbs of just food, then start worrying about home dehydration and all else.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 13 2013, 6:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Pot w/ lid, spoon and stove.
Breakfasts are usually variants of instant oatmeal and hot tea.
Lunches are cold (unless winter and even then the stove may be fired up just for a hot drink):
-apples with cheese or peanut butter
-bagels with something
-summer sausage, cheese, crackers
-possibly something made up at breakfast and rolled into a tortilla
Dinners can be a wide range of things. Sometimes reconstituted FD, others I actually cook. Maybe tuna casserole. Beef and noodles. Beef, rice and bean burritos (good instant refried beans can be picked up at a Food Coop)


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 14 2013, 12:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Firedancer @ Jun. 13 2013, 1:04 pm)
QUOTE

(AlmostThere @ May 23 2013, 10:30 am)
QUOTE
If you are cooking dinner anyway, what is the difference between putting leftovers in a container, or on a tray into a dehydrator? NOTHING. Same effort.

Well, for starters, not everyone owns a dehydrator.

Plus I never run less than 4 trays on my dehydrator (it isn't efficient and my dehydrator whistles with 1-3 trays only).  Typically you aren't going to have 4 trays of leftovers!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 14 2013, 8:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tipi Walter @ Jun. 13 2013, 4:15 pm)
QUOTE

(buddero @ May 20 2013, 12:59 am)
QUOTE
Here is food for ~9 days in the northern Winds, then 6 more days in southern. Used super-cat stove as described in post. http://ckjournal.blogspot.com/2009/08/food-for-wyoming.html

That's a good post on food and dehydration.

BUT . . .  for a short 3 or 4 day trip I'd just take whatever you feel like as your food load will never be much.  In fact, I'd go ahead and take canned chili or refried beans or soups or whatever you feel like taking.  Cans won't kill you on such a short trip.

I know, I know, BLASPHEMER!!

Variety is important due to tongue boredom so take an avocado or watermelon or what the heck ever.  Don't worry about the weight.  When you have to carry 40 lbs of just food, then start worrying about home dehydration and all else.

Burn him, he's a witch!

I'm with you man.  Take something good.  Carrying out an empty can is pretty easy.  A Sweet Sue chicken and dumplings can is worth carrying in and out.

There's people here that know I can produce the finest pasta with just a freezer bag.  Still, If I want something that weighs, I tote it.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 18 2013, 6:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's been my contention all along; for shorter multi-day trips, carry some water in your food. It's going to get consumed, right? And it leaves more room for H20 to clean self and stuff, or make another cup of (mmm...) coffee.

More and more good foods are coming out in the shelf-stable pouches. With some cous-cous and toasted pita? Cold winter night? Sure, a lot of them are of the Indian variety, but I've seen chili, as well.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 18 2013, 12:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There are some great in-pouch soups form Campbells available now. The Indian and spicy Thai soups are really great on cold nights when you want to raise your internal body temperature a bit before bed and put some protein in your system to keep your metabolism churning through low temperatures. Some peanuts added to the Thai one help this out a lot as well.

Volume wise they're pretty much the same size as MH or similar and as others have said, you're basically just relocating the water you would need for dinner to a different vessel.

That being said, I'd even consider dehydrating them for meals for a week plus. But for 3-4 days you might as well just toss three or four in there for variety. :)

Here's one;

http://www.amazon.com/Campbel....96RP8FA

Can always boil in pouch as well to save cleanup if water is plentiful, the pouches will stand up to microwaving then they'll survive heading in water.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 22 2013, 12:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Of course, the difference is that if you carry the water already in the food, you carry it all the time.  I usually backpack in places where there is water, so I carry little water, and get what I need along the way.  The exception is when we camp in the desert, where must carry all our water. Then I usually pack stuff with all the water in it and no cooking needed, so I can use the space of stove and fuel for more water.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 23 2013, 2:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

At home, normally I'm biking so trying to keep the same diet pretty much.  For breakfast, just like home, I'll eat oatmeal with dried fruit (or maybe cold cereal when hotter) for breakfast with 1 Starbucks via.  For dinner I'll usually eat pasta with olive oil and pesto, or maybe healthy Mexican with rehydrated beans, fresh jalapeño, and tortillas, ... might try a Japanese food night one day.   Lunch is a little tricky as I do not eat it regularly.  If it's a massive mileage or altitude day, I'll have a blueberry bagel with blueberry preserves and peanut butter.  Sometimes just a tortilla.  

One the last day, I try planning for couscous since if I run out of stove fuel, that type of pasta can be rehydrated cold.

On the drive back, I'll eat whatever.  On the night up towards the TH, some sorta non-reactive carbs like a Wendy's baked potato or a microbrew beer w/pizza


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