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Topic: Switching from freeze dried cup< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 2:41 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

first off its not supposed to say cup in the title, damn phone!
I need tips on getting started with my move from freeze dried.
I have mostly taken the lazy route and relied it.

Where can I info? How to start with the easy stuff?


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PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 4:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Walk around a good grocery store with an eye for lightweight, shelf-stable, nutrient dense options.  There are lots of things that work well for backpacking.

Then take a look at

www.trailcooking.com
www.freezerbagcooking.com
www.onepanwonders.com


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PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 6:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

At the risk of being redundant, I will copy and paste a previous post of mine from another cooking thread.  Best advice I can give you is to check out a few websites, and then decide if you want to buy a dehydrator for your home.  By dehydrating your own meals, you can vary them to suit your own tastes, heat, spices, preferences, whatever.

"Being as you are new, I will explain what we mean by FBC meals.  FBC is Freezer Bag Cooking.  Something like Ziplock freezer bags will hold boiling water.  Try it out in your kitchen sink, especially if you are going to use a cheaper brand.  It must be a freezer bag, as the storage ones are less sturdy and will leak.

Lots of dry ingredients can be assembled for a meal.  Most folks start out using Stove Top stuffing and adding something like a foil pack of chicken or tuna.  Or Instant mashed potatoes and a meat.  Instant rice comes in either white or brown these days.  Then they graduate to using recipes from one of the sources listed by Ponderosa, or the Youtube Channel of MrBabelfish5 / Hungry Hammock Hiker.  In camp, all we do is boil water, add it to the bag, and wait 8 minutes.  I carry a tea pot to boil my water, and a White Box stove.

That is an alcohol stove, which you can learn all about on the inter webs.  Lots of stoves out there.  Some are more of a blow torch, so you cannot simmer anything, but good for boiling water.

I eat cold meals for breakfast and lunch, only needing hot water for my dinner.  I do not drink hot fluids of any flavor so that reduces the fuel and time spent heating water.  My meal planning for 5 days might look like this:

5 breakfasts of either peanut butter and sandwich thins, a mix of protein bars, or protein replacement meals. Lunches will be several of the following: jerky, mini waxed cheese, tortillas or flat bread, Justin's almond butter with honey, cashews, and M&Ms.  I mix and match as my mood suits me.

5 dinners will be mostly freeze-dried or home dehydrated meals from the following choices: Beef Stroganoff, Spaghetti, Chili Mac, Stove Top and Chicken, Knorr Sides Rice and a pack of tuna or salmon, or sometimes a soup mix from Bear Creek with some sort of meat tossed in at the last few minutes.

Even folks who use commercial freeze-dried meals will sometimes repackage them into zip locks, for space savings if they need to use a bear canister.  I am currently repackaging meals for 2 into smaller portions.  I get 5 meals out of 4 packages of Serves 2 meals.  I used to be able to eat the entire Serves 2 meal, but I am getting older."  


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PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 10:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've seen this post in cooking thread, and yes it's very helpful... actually, it's up to you to decide on what to choose from those options pick the best what you think.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2013, 10:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just want to know where to look for more getting started information.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2013, 1:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If it is info you are seeking, then the links that Ponderosa supplied will be more than adequate, and the YouTube channel is full of videos.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2013, 7:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sixgun @ Jun. 01 2013, 8:39 am)
QUOTE
I just want to know where to look for more getting started information.

Reading through old threads, right here in the this cooking forum, is an excellent place to start.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 1:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Savory Spice and a dehydrator.  Mix up your own meals and test them out before heading out on the trail.  Cook them at lunch, dinner or even dayhikes.  Trial and error is a good way to eat great on the trail.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 15 2013, 12:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ May 29 2013, 6:33 pm)
QUOTE
At the risk of being redundant, I will copy and paste a previous post of mine from another cooking thread.  Best advice I can give you is to check out a few websites, and then decide if you want to buy a dehydrator for your home.  By dehydrating your own meals, you can vary them to suit your own tastes, heat, spices, preferences, whatever.

"Being as you are new, I will explain what we mean by FBC meals.  FBC is Freezer Bag Cooking.  Something like Ziplock freezer bags will hold boiling water.  Try it out in your kitchen sink, especially if you are going to use a cheaper brand.  It must be a freezer bag, as the storage ones are less sturdy and will leak.

Lots of dry ingredients can be assembled for a meal.  Most folks start out using Stove Top stuffing and adding something like a foil pack of chicken or tuna.  Or Instant mashed potatoes and a meat.  Instant rice comes in either white or brown these days.  Then they graduate to using recipes from one of the sources listed by Ponderosa, or the Youtube Channel of MrBabelfish5 / Hungry Hammock Hiker.  In camp, all we do is boil water, add it to the bag, and wait 8 minutes.  I carry a tea pot to boil my water, and a White Box stove.

That is an alcohol stove, which you can learn all about on the inter webs.  Lots of stoves out there.  Some are more of a blow torch, so you cannot simmer anything, but good for boiling water.

I eat cold meals for breakfast and lunch, only needing hot water for my dinner.  I do not drink hot fluids of any flavor so that reduces the fuel and time spent heating water.  My meal planning for 5 days might look like this:

5 breakfasts of either peanut butter and sandwich thins, a mix of protein bars, or protein replacement meals. Lunches will be several of the following: jerky, mini waxed cheese, tortillas or flat bread, Justin's almond butter with honey, cashews, and M&Ms.  I mix and match as my mood suits me.

5 dinners will be mostly freeze-dried or home dehydrated meals from the following choices: Beef Stroganoff, Spaghetti, Chili Mac, Stove Top and Chicken, Knorr Sides Rice and a pack of tuna or salmon, or sometimes a soup mix from Bear Creek with some sort of meat tossed in at the last few minutes.

Even folks who use commercial freeze-dried meals will sometimes repackage them into zip locks, for space savings if they need to use a bear canister.  I am currently repackaging meals for 2 into smaller portions.  I get 5 meals out of 4 packages of Serves 2 meals.  I used to be able to eat the entire Serves 2 meal, but I am getting older."  

Thank you very much, this is very helpful

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 15 2013, 12:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would love to find a list of simple to make foods from the grocery store.
Such as instant loaded mashed potatoes, only one I have used so far and love them on the trail.

I have seen pop tarts mentioned here but can't find any mention of ways to toast them, I know most eat them cold but toasted would be nice and I cannot think of a way to hold them over my stove, with out taking something heavy.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 15 2013, 10:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sixgun @ Jun. 14 2013, 10:31 pm)
QUOTE
I would love to find a list of simple to make foods from the grocery store.
Such as instant loaded mashed potatoes, only one I have used so far and love them on the trail.

I have seen pop tarts mentioned here but can't find any mention of ways to toast them, I know most eat them cold but toasted would be nice and I cannot think of a way to hold them over my stove, with out taking something heavy.

Have you taken a moment to look at the links that Ponderosa suggested?    If you do, you will find loads of info about "simple to make foods from the grocery store", especially on the One Pan Wonders site.  That is her specialty.    Are you really expecting people to recreate all of that info right here in your own thread?  Just wondering.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 15 2013, 5:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well I have a different take on Backpacking than most. I like to eat and enjoy the wilderness. Not an Ultra light backpacker but the most my pack weighs for a 5 or 6 day trip is 36 to 38 pounds. Which I guess I could lose some weight in new sleeping bag, tent and such. But I could not leave the Bemco Oven behind. But this is a sample meal guide that I am using to do our annual Mt. Whitney trip. Bake pizza at the top!!! This is going to be a 5 day trip Wednesday to Monday.

Horseshoe Meadow to Whitney Portal
                       Food list
Pizza  Makes  6 pizzas each pizza is 600 calories. Two pizzas at each meal. Also 2 pizzas at the top of Mt. Whitney along with a batch of brownies.
   o 3 cups flour, 2 packs yeast, 6 packs sugar, 6 packs salt, 1 tube tomato paste, Pepperoni,  Mushrooms, onions, Bell peppers, 12 ounces of mozzarella cheese.

Enchiladas makes 1- 6” pan each pan is one serving and 1100 calories each.
   o 3- 6 inch flour tortillas, 1 pack crumbled beef, 1 pack seasoning, 4 oz cheddar cheese.

Biscuits & Gravy makes 3 large pans 720 calories each
   o 3 packs biscuit mix, 2 packs gravy mix, Bacon bits.

Muffins each mix makes 1- 6” x2” thick muffin cake 720 calories each
   o 1 pack banana nut, 1 pack blueberry.

Chili & cornbread makes enough for 12 servings 3700 calories split between 3 people
   o 1 pack chili mix with beans and veggies,  tomato paste from pizza list, 1 pack cornbread mix (just add water)

Trail mix for lunch along with beef jerky and summer sausage.
   o Summer sausage total of one 5 ounce at 500 calories.
   o 2 cups trail mix at 400 calories per cup (1/2 cup per day)
   o Dried fruit 2 cups at 640 calories per cup ( 1/2 cup per day)
   o Beef jerky home made about 200 calories per day ( 1/2 lb for the trip)  

Desert every night
   o Chocolate chip muffins (2 packs) 720 calories each
   o Brownies ( ¼ cup oil & ¼ cup water ) bake 25 min or until done.  1170 calories per batch. Split between 3 people.
   o Peanut butter cookies. 1170 calories split between 3 people.

Total calories 19240 divided by 4 days equals 4810 per day.

This food has little or no preservatives or chemicals added as it is all made fresh on the trail. Prep time ranges from 3 min to 5 min each meal. Bake times range from 12 min to 30 min for the brownies and enchiladas.

Total weight 162.5 ounces or 10.1 lbs. that equals 1904 calories per pound of food.

The extra items to share are the brownies 7 ounces, the chocolate chip muffins 6.5 ounces times two, the peanut butter cookies 7.5 ounces. Total extra weight  28 ounces.

:D


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 16 2013, 1:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Rockybasin @ Jun. 15 2013, 5:00 pm)
QUOTE
Well I have a different take on Backpacking than most. I like to eat and enjoy the wilderness. Not an Ultra light backpacker but the most my pack weighs for a 5 or 6 day trip is 36 to 38 pounds. Which I guess I could lose some weight in new sleeping bag, tent and such. But I could not leave the Bemco Oven behind. But this is a sample meal guide that I am using to do our annual Mt. Whitney trip. Bake pizza at the top!!! This is going to be a 5 day trip Wednesday to Monday.

Horseshoe Meadow to Whitney Portal
                       Food list
Pizza  Makes  6 pizzas each pizza is 600 calories. Two pizzas at each meal. Also 2 pizzas at the top of Mt. Whitney along with a batch of brownies.
   o 3 cups flour, 2 packs yeast, 6 packs sugar, 6 packs salt, 1 tube tomato paste, Pepperoni,  Mushrooms, onions, Bell peppers, 12 ounces of mozzarella cheese.

Enchiladas makes 1- 6” pan each pan is one serving and 1100 calories each.
   o 3- 6 inch flour tortillas, 1 pack crumbled beef, 1 pack seasoning, 4 oz cheddar cheese.

Biscuits & Gravy makes 3 large pans 720 calories each
   o 3 packs biscuit mix, 2 packs gravy mix, Bacon bits.

Muffins each mix makes 1- 6” x2” thick muffin cake 720 calories each
   o 1 pack banana nut, 1 pack blueberry.

Chili & cornbread makes enough for 12 servings 3700 calories split between 3 people
   o 1 pack chili mix with beans and veggies,  tomato paste from pizza list, 1 pack cornbread mix (just add water)

Trail mix for lunch along with beef jerky and summer sausage.
   o Summer sausage total of one 5 ounce at 500 calories.
   o 2 cups trail mix at 400 calories per cup (1/2 cup per day)
   o Dried fruit 2 cups at 640 calories per cup ( 1/2 cup per day)
   o Beef jerky home made about 200 calories per day ( 1/2 lb for the trip)  

Desert every night
   o Chocolate chip muffins (2 packs) 720 calories each
   o Brownies ( ¼ cup oil & ¼ cup water ) bake 25 min or until done.  1170 calories per batch. Split between 3 people.
   o Peanut butter cookies. 1170 calories split between 3 people.

Total calories 19240 divided by 4 days equals 4810 per day.

This food has little or no preservatives or chemicals added as it is all made fresh on the trail. Prep time ranges from 3 min to 5 min each meal. Bake times range from 12 min to 30 min for the brownies and enchiladas.

Total weight 162.5 ounces or 10.1 lbs. that equals 1904 calories per pound of food.

The extra items to share are the brownies 7 ounces, the chocolate chip muffins 6.5 ounces times two, the peanut butter cookies 7.5 ounces. Total extra weight  28 ounces.

:D

Please let me hike with you some time.
I don't eat that good at home LOL
Thanks for the detailed post, that helps a lot.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 16 2013, 10:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well I figure I am on vacation. So why should I punish myself with bad food!
Good food makes you feel good and fills you up. Plus I can actually get all the calories, protein and carbs I need to hike and be comfortable.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 17 2013, 3:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Deborah @ Jun. 15 2013, 7:13 am)
QUOTE

(sixgun @ Jun. 14 2013, 10:31 pm)
QUOTE
I would love to find a list of simple to make foods from the grocery store.
Such as instant loaded mashed potatoes, only one I have used so far and love them on the trail.

I have seen pop tarts mentioned here but can't find any mention of ways to toast them, I know most eat them cold but toasted would be nice and I cannot think of a way to hold them over my stove, with out taking something heavy.

Have you taken a moment to look at the links that Ponderosa suggested?    If you do, you will find loads of info about "simple to make foods from the grocery store", especially on the One Pan Wonders site.  That is her specialty.    Are you really expecting people to recreate all of that info right here in your own thread?  Just wondering.

Thanks lady. :)

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 04 2013, 11:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Creating your own backpack meals are a fun and interesting
Way to expirement!

You mentioned instant potatoes. I do not buy the complete
potatoes. I do get the idahoe flakes because they are larger and
consistency is everything.  To make yours resdy to go,  you can
get better butter sprinkle and dehydrated milk. This gives you the
potatoe base.  

I then add dehydrated veggies and other seasonings to small portions
in freezer bags as Ole explained earlier. These also make great soup
thickeners. Get creative with it, whatever you like.  This is where
the fun comes in.

Also,  you can dehydrate with your oven on warm setting w ith the
door cracked to let moisture out.  I do not know how this costs versus
a dehydrator, but it is an alternative.

Just remember that herbs and spices are invaluable on the trail.  
As for resources, they are everywhere. Look for hiking or backpacking
camping or boyscouts trs il food or dehydrated meals.  Or get creative
and change your favorite recipes up, and let us know how it goes.
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