SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

 

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Gourmet Backpacking, steering away from one pot meals< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
CraigWilliams Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 17 2013, 5:15 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi,

I'm just back from a short trip around the Balkans in Europe and found cooking on a single gas burner to be somewhat of a nuisance. I understand that camp cooking is different from home cooking, but I always find myself wanting another burner to give more variety to just one pot meals. This may be me and a small minority of people out there but I'm interested in what others like myself (people that love food) do to combat the problem. I've not found any suitable products out there with two burners which are light enough for the backpacker, unless I were to simply take 2 separate systems.

Please tell me your thoughts on this, Craig.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12395
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 17 2013, 6:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think you will find many folks here who love food, that make their own dehydrated meals to use FBC style.  That only requires one burner.  There are some others who like to go the route you are talking about, and I recall 1 who bakes on the trail.

For me, the trail is not about cooking, but looking.  I try to take in as much scenery as possible, while sustaining myself as simply as possible.  I try to take a variety of things to eat, but find myself repeating dinner meals if I am out more than 5-6 days.

I know I am not the type of camp chef you were looking for, but I just wanted to say that just because we can get by with one pot, doesn't mean we do not love food.  We have 2 authors of backpacking cookbooks entirely devoted to either 1 pot or FBC style meals to be counted among our regulars here.  Both of those people are very much food lovers.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
wcolucci Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2033
Joined: Feb. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 17 2013, 9:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was packing last night for this weekends trip and I ALWAYS look back on the 2005 Gear Guide as they have a minimalistic pack it list I always look at.

They had a two burner canister stove in there...but I forgot the name...i'll check tonight if no one else has an answer.

I think it was a Coleman Peak One.  Here is a link to a picture from Spiritburners

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion....500.jpg


--------------
getting old stinks...but it beats the alternative
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
wwwest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6291
Joined: Dec. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 17 2013, 3:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Get hold of the NOLS cookbook, for advice on gear and on good quality, real food cooked in the wilderness by backpackers.  They love baking and quick bread preparation.

I seriously doubt that there is a  gear solution for the one burner problem, but there are ways to cook good meals on one burner, with planning and creative prep work.

Or, you can do what works so well for the NOLS folk, they are not solo backpackers, usually, and they have a single burner for every participant, so maybe 5-10 stoves for any meal preparation.  But 2 or 3 is plenty.

Covers everything except solo hiking and cooking.


--------------
"The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."

- John Kenneth Galbraith
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
Chuck D Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7860
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 17 2013, 9:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Coleman made a relatively light weight 2 burner stove in their Powermax series, the Xcursion, worked well.  Might be able to find one somewhere and then get the adapter to use standard canisters.

--------------
Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry,
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
CraigWilliams Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: Oct. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2013, 12:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't trying to suggest that backpackers that cook with one pot don't 'love food', simply that it limits the possibilities. One pot meals are great and can be very extravagant - thanks to the people working on camp recipes. Baking on trail, now I can't say i've heard of that, what a skill to have. Do you suggest that 'camp chefs' are few and far between?

That coleman burner is exactly the sort of thing I was looking for, shame it's no longer in production. I have seen a handful of double burners currently in production but not one which seems to be geared to the backpacker/traveler (compact and lightweight).

Cheers, Craig
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
llamapacker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 998
Joined: Feb. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 21 2013, 5:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

With a 9.5" pan I can cook hash brown potatoes, scrambled eggs and toast for two.  I enjoy a large breakfast.  I also carry and sometimes use a second stove if I want pancakes and hash browns.  For that I use a lid from a pot to cook the potatoes.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
bad knees Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2467
Joined: May 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 22 2013, 4:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(CraigWilliams @ Oct. 21 2013, 12:09 pm)
QUOTE
Thanks for the replies.

I wasn't trying to suggest that backpackers that cook with one pot don't 'love food', simply that it limits the possibilities. One pot meals are great and can be very extravagant - thanks to the people working on camp recipes. Baking on trail, now I can't say i've heard of that, what a skill to have. Do you suggest that 'camp chefs' are few and far between?

That coleman burner is exactly the sort of thing I was looking for, shame it's no longer in production. I have seen a handful of double burners currently in production but not one which seems to be geared to the backpacker/traveler (compact and lightweight).

Cheers, Craig

It's the Peak 1 expedition.  Great stove.  There is one used on ebay.  Hard to find.  I still have the single.  I sear tuna on a cast iron pan on it.  Gets to about 4 million degrees.

--------------
Nature bats last!

             
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
shpongle Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 633
Joined: May 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 02 2013, 2:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(CraigWilliams @ Oct. 21 2013, 7:09 am)
QUOTE
Baking on trail, now I can't say i've heard of that, what a skill to have.

Take a look at the "Outback Oven".  It's designed for baking using a typical camp stove.

I just did an overnighter with it last weekend.  We had baked enchiladas for dinner and delicious pancakes for breakfast.  I swear it cooks pancakes better than my stove at home!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2231
Joined: Oct. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 02 2013, 9:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1 on the Outback Oven. It works great for baking and to also use as a fry pan. Pizzas are really nice to do in it. Another idea is a Svante-Freden reflector oven. They are small and relatively lt wt. Great for pizza and other baked goods.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
TDale Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 14875
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 03 2013, 2:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Obtain and learn to cook on Trangia alcohol burners.  They're lightweight and multiples are easy to carry.  Learn to fish, too.

--------------
"Sure as I know anything, I know this - they will try again...They'll swing back to the belief that they can make people... better. And I do not hold to that. So no more runnin'. I aim to misbehave."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5542
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 10:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

How does it limit possibilities when you can dehydrate nearly everything you make in the kitchen?

Tuna casserole is one of my staples - it gets made and dehydrated right before the trip. Along with my favorite chili, and a ton of other stuff including Indian dishes. Things that don't dehydrate well can be had from freeze drying sources.

Steam baking is as easy as a silicon cupcake cup or three in a regular old titanium pot, balanced on a few rocks with some water in the bottom.

I hike with a lot of people who take fake food, but I don't intend to suffer that much.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42813
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 07 2013, 12:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Two alcohol stoves will still weigh practically nothing beyond the additional fuel needed so that may offer a route to multi-burner meals.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
pugslie Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 34
Joined: May 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 10 2013, 4:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(wcolucci @ Oct. 17 2013, 6:34 am)
QUOTE
I was packing last night for this weekends trip and I ALWAYS look back on the 2005 Gear Guide as they have a minimalistic pack it list I always look at.

They had a two burner canister stove in there...but I forgot the name...i'll check tonight if no one else has an answer.

I think it was a Coleman Peak One.  Here is a link to a picture from Spiritburners

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion....500.jpg

Coleman had a line of 3 stoves that used those PowerMax fuel canisters....the Xtreme (three legged), the Xpert (4 legged and the Xpedition (2 burner) plus a suitcase model that featured a stove and grill.  I have all 4 with adaptors to use standard lindal valve gas canisters or 100% propane canisters.  The  Xpedition (2 burner) makes a dandy car camping stove.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
booyah Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1974
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 25 2013, 2:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

FWIW when we want another burner, this is where alcohol stoves rock.  Very light/cheap and small.  Not much flame control, but make a "slow" one and its a great simmer stove.

I have one thats built for simmers, and another that does high heat/boils.  Choose the right stove for the use and go nuts.  I need to make myself a pancake one one of these days  :D
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
Idaho Bob Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 753
Joined: Jun. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2014, 5:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I typically cook for two on my Caldera Cone, and we take a small gas burning stove to cook water on the side while the Caldera Cone is cooking something else, or baking.  A small canister of fuel lasts us 7 days like that, plus we have alcohol fuel for the Caldera.  

Bob
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 17
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2615
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2014, 11:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No reason you can't take two stove setups.  When I hike with friends, we often pack as if hiking solo, each of us taking a solo shelter, stove, pot, etc.  We usually coordinate and share at least some of the dinners; I might take a soup to share while the other person takes a main dish.

Another good way is to have some FBC side dishes that just need boiling water and then have a main dish that gets cooked in a pot.  I do that often.  You could do a stir-fry in the pot and hydrate rice in a bag.  Boil the water first and while the side dishes are hydrating, cook the main dish.


--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
SWest Search for posts by this member.
No And Then!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 185
Joined: Dec. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 31 2014, 11:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Craig,

Im a jetboil fan so I FBC, but I just wanted to say that I hope you'll do a trip report on your Balkans trip!


--------------
The woods are lovely dark and deep, but I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep. -Frost
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
Moonlight Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 125
Joined: Jan. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 31 2014, 3:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have 2 of Coleman/peakone xpedition double burner stove. I do have the fuel adapter to use regular fuel canisters with it but I have not seen anywhere that you would be able to find the adapter now if you bought the stove on Ebay. I actually don't mind taking two separate stoves as you don't have to have the burners so close to each other. I bake and cook more elaborate meals sometimes so two stoves do come in handy. Minibull Design has alcohol stoves that can simmer. I have the M5 which they no longer make, but there is a few other models that will as well. I have the jetboil as well and use the Sumo cup to bake in now. Lots of options to consider.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
18 replies since Oct. 17 2013, 5:15 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


 
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Gourmet Backpacking
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions