SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 3123>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: JMT questions, Planning thru-hike, pondering logistics< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 30 2012, 9:41 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My daughter and I are planning a John Muir Trail thru-hike (N->S) for this August-September.  Going to try to do it in three weeks and know we'll need resupply.
I have some questions for those familiar with the JMT:

1.Can you buy bp food at the resupply points (Reds, Vermillion, MTR), or are you better mailing yourself food? It seems with the postage and fees charged, is it cheaper/better to just buy their food?
2. Is it better to camp high or low, valley or ridges, by lakes, forests or open? (Consider mosquitos)
3. How is the fishing in the lakes?
4. How many days worth of food can you get in the bear canisters-the ones rented from Yosemite?

Thanks, any input, ideas, or advice is appreciated.


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12364
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 30 2012, 10:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Limited bp'er food is available at Red's, but the other 2 places are a bit better.  I know MTR sells food not picked up, if the shipper prefers that option.  I'd ship my own just so I would know what was there.

I prefer to camp just before a big incline, so I can tackle it while fresh in the AM.

Sorry, not a fisherman.

I find it possible to get 7 days worth of food in the canisters, so by carrying the food you will eat before sleeping, you can get by with 2 resupplies, on your schedule, if they are just right.  It is a long way between MTR and Whitney Portal, though.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 31 2012, 12:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

August into September Mosquitos aren't an issue with extremely rare exceptions.  That said i like ridges, cooler but better views.

Oh and that's 7 days of food for one person. But on the first day that food doesn't go in the canister , since the storage requirement doesnt include when you're travelling, so you get a bonus day.

http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/bearcans.htm
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1680
Joined: Mar. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 31 2012, 11:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Last August when I stumbled through MTR you could have re-supplied a scout troop for free with stuff people had shipped there and never showed up to claim. I can't remember how well-stocked their store was since I only asked for beer (which they don't sell). I'd ship a bucket of stuff there - it's expensive but a sure thing and looks like a nice place to spend a night after a couple weeks on the trail.

You'll camp where everybody else camps, since there will be plenty of other people out there. People usually camp close to water because it makes life easier. You'll figure out what you like to do along the trail.

(I haven't hike the whole thing but have backpacked parts of it. I'm planning to do the whole thing in the next couple of years)
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
snusmumriken Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 366
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 01 2013, 2:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Tuolomne Meadows has several of options for resupply:
a store with car camper and backpacker foods, beer, ice-cream etc. There is also a grill for a quick hamburger, a post-office so you can mail yourself stuff and bear boxes if you want to stash a resupply.

Reds Meadow is similar with a store and a restaurant, but post-office pick-up and resupply stashing carries an extra fee here.

VVR has a restaurant, a store and you can mail your resupply for a fee. The assortment in the store varies from year to year and you might be hard pressed to resupply for more than a few days from this store.

The store at MTR sells no food items at all. All they have for sale is gas canisters, postcards, and souvenirs.

The resupply service at MTR however is legendary and very well organized. Resupply customers are also welcome to leave the stuff they mailed themselves but decide they don't need and to pick up whatever others have discarded.

The Garcia cans that Yosemite will rent you for a $5 fee fits 6 days of food for one person according to the manufacturer. But that assumes you pack it like this.

Have fun on your JMT trek!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2013, 4:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So is it too risky to count on using the leftover food in the barrel at MTR? Seems very expensive to ship a bucket and I keep hearing about the abundant food barrel.

--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2051
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2013, 7:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Plan on DEET in your bag along with high number UV protection, hat and sunglasses.  Then you can camp where you would like.

You can pack an amazing amount of calories (taste might be questionable), by layering dry bulk items in plastic and tamping each layer densely with a full water bottle.  Rice, wheat, pasta, peanut butter, pita bread/tortillas and similar can make a lot of meals.  Bring oil to add to the meals - highest calorie per weight/bulk. You will need a considerable number of calories on the trail if you are planning long hours.  You can expect 400-600 Kcal an hour while hiking with full pack, at altitude, uphill in the heat.  Plan on putting on a few pounds on a fit body before you leave.  Taking no prepared food with you costs you time and fuel.

The longest bit of  unsupported hiking is from MTR to Whitney.  You can resupply over Kearsarge Pass to Onion Valley to food in Independence that you have mailed.  The good people at one of the hotels (now closed) would drag it up the hill to the trail head for a reasonable fee. The manager of the campground does NOT participate in resupply.  You loose a day going to Independence if you catch a reasonable thumb ride down and up.  The problem is traffic is usually up hill in the morning and down at night.  You could probably do with a nice bath and bed by that time anyway.

Same could apply to Parcher's Camp over Bishop Pass.  Its a nice walk up over the pass and down about a mile below South Lake to Parchers.  You can call them if interested.

Pound of body fat - about 3500 Kcal

FATS
16 fl oz of olive oil   3900Kcal (16 (dry) oz more than 4000Kcal)
16 oz of butter (2 cups) = 3,200 calories
16 oz Peanut Butter (creamy) 2708

SWEETS
16 oz sugar (2 1/4 cups) = 1,733 calories
16 oz Corn Syrup 1920Kcal
16 oz Aunt Jamima's Maple (flavored) Syrup 1890
16oz Trader Joe Unsweatened Pineapple (freeze dried) 1760
16 oz Shady Maple Farms Organic Maple Syrup  1680
16 oz Honey 1320
16 oz of chocolate chips  2200Kcal

DRY WEIGHT

16 oz macaroni pasta  1680
16 oz Spaghetti 1680
16 oz Krusteaz Pancake mix 1680
16 oz of rice  1600Kcal
16 oz Kellogs Froot Loops 1656
16 oz (Blue) Cornmeal 1647
16 oz Bulgar (Wheat) 1520
16 oz General Mills Total  1500
16 oz Split Peas (dry) 1170
16 oz  Lintels (dry) 1040

Prepared:  Yum salt and fat added..

16 oz Trader Joe Madras Lintel (heat and eat) 416Kcal (2-160kcal servings in 10oz package)
16 oz Mountain House Beef Teriaki 1224 ( a package for two is .55 pound 680Kcal)
16 oz Mountain House Beef/Noodle Stoganoff 1582  (package for four is .79 pound  1250 Kcal )


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
larrys Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 417
Joined: Jul. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2013, 10:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

We did the trip a few years ago and sent food to T. Meadows, Red Meadows and MTR.  If you are flying in to Reno and taking the bus up you can leave your food package at the post office in T. Meadows and ask them to hold it for you.  The bus makes a quick stop there, just tell the driver to wait for you.  Go as light as you can out of YV due to elevation gain.

Go with sending your food to MTR and don't chance picking over what is left.  They have weight restrictions on each bucket so you might have to send two.  If you like beer put a couple in your can and they'll be nice and cool for you when you get there.

I highly recommend trying to spend the night at MTR if at all possible.  You can wash clothes and get cleaned up, plus get some good food.  They have some restrictions on staying there but try calling them or emailing them to beg your way in.  You won't regret it.

The canisters from Yosemite are smaller than what you will need leaving MTR so I would suggest getting the largest Bearikade canister (14") to fit your food into.  Your speed seems similar to ours and we carried ten days worth of food from MTR to Whitney.

There are definitely some great lakes to fish in and we saw plenty of 12" and larger golden trout cruising the shores.

We tended to camp by water, so that was what we targeted each evening.  The last half of the trip pretty much everyone is on the same schedule and sleeps in the same general areas - before the passes or just after.

Make sure to target Rae Lakes as one of your campsites.  Also Red Meadows has hot showers, just send yourself a towel, soap and shampoo in your food drop.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 09 2013, 10:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

All great tips, thanks guys!
I like the food suggestions, SPeacok, if I can just figure out how to cook that stuff!
I hope to do some fishing and would like to cook and eat the trout if I can figure out a way without making a mess.  Frying them just seems to messy.
We do plan on staying a MTR, I've already emailed them.


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2051
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 10 2013, 11:37 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The list is just a reference and to point out that a 1 person serving from most company's prepared entree, provides enough calories for a sedentary book keeper.  By the end of the second week you could probably be tempted into eating most anything.  I've supported drops at Kearsarge Lakes and bring in 4 person freeze dried helpings for each for every meal.  Its about 4/5 days to a couple of burgers at the Portal. 3 or 4 Snicker bars will get you from the top of Whitney to the Portal for a substantial offering of fries.

Many don't consider this a fishing trip.  Lugging the gear the entire trail for a few fish or two-three lakes doesn't seem worth it to most.  You will be plenty busy walking with your schedule.  But, then again, there is nothing like plopping a line into a lake or stream that looks like it is full of large sharks. Cut to size to fit (hopefully that big) and cook them slowly on a small non-stick frying pan.   Take a little bottle of Grape Seed oil with you.  If you have a top for the pan, you can poach them in water and Tabasco too.  Sushi is good, just make sure you know how to cook 'sticky' rice.  Most hikers are not skilled enough (nor have the time) fishers to make any kind of a sizable dent in the food they carry.  BUT, having said that I watched a young woman catch 18 fish (and release) in a Kearsarge Lake in about two hours of evening fishing.    I was next to her trying to fish the same area and caught 2 small ones.  I suspect hers were  the same village idiot most of the times.  

Read up on the BACKCOUNTRY COOKING forum here or on other sites. There are good suggestions how to prepare and cook 'from scratch'. Plan on a varied diet. Probably not the best plan to learn how to cook on the trail :)  You will get tired of eating humus, pita bread, peanut butter and honey. Plan on spending a good part of your day snacking to get a continuous supply of calories (and water) into you.  You can not overeat on this trip...you just can't carry enough.   Dehydrated prepared packages are convenient, might taste better than your cooking,  but not a lot of calories.   If you go the dehydrated  off the shelf route, get a variety of company's packages. One company's seasoning is generally used in most of its entrees.  After three weeks the same chili pepper and sage flavors get a bit dull.  Spend some time eating the foods you think you would like to have on the trail.  If you can't stand it at home it may not work for you on the trail either.


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
markskor Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1177
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2013, 6:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoWest @ Dec. 30 2012, 9:41 pm)
QUOTE
3. How is the fishing in the lakes?
Thanks, any input, ideas, or advice is appreciated.


Sort of depends on whether you want to hike the Muir or fish it.
FWIW, there are indeed ample opportunities all along the Muir for trout goodness - a lot of too-small 6 inch goldens but you also pass close to more than a few lakes where 5 pound lunkers are very possible. 1 - 2 pounders can be found almost daily. (Do your homework.)
Great fishing, no, world class fishing abounds but you do have to get off the main trail some and as such, cut down on the daily, pre-scripted, "I have to camp at X mentality" miles and not be in a Muir hurry. Alas, most who hike the Muir never get more than 100 feet off trail. Those who fish the JMT explore options a bit more. My last JMT wound up taking 32 days and I had fish at least 1/2 of evenings...FWIW one of my top 5, all-time trips ever.

As for cooking, Aluminum-foiled trout packages roasted over hot coals...BTW, you can trade trout for almost anything...good to know between MTR and the Portal Burger.

Lastly, if you are doing this early season, pre-sending food buckets ahead may ease your trail angst but the fact is the Muir can also be done quite nicely using cash/ credit cards and a bounce box...I know. Things may cost a bit more up there - Tuolumne, Reds, VVR, MTR, but good choices for food re-stocking are possible (albeit time consuming), and there are those multiple, $50 bucket fees that you save.
Best advice, Be flexible and take your time if possible.


--------------
mountain man who swims with trout
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5522
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 20 2013, 9:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoWest @ Dec. 30 2012, 9:41 pm)
QUOTE
1.Can you buy bp food at the resupply points (Reds, Vermillion, MTR), or are you better mailing yourself food? It seems with the postage and fees charged, is it cheaper/better to just buy their food?
2. Is it better to camp high or low, valley or ridges, by lakes, forests or open? (Consider mosquitos)
3. How is the fishing in the lakes?
4. How many days worth of food can you get in the bear canisters-the ones rented from Yosemite?

Thanks, any input, ideas, or advice is appreciated.

1 - There are frequently hiker boxes (the one at MTR is a series of huge buckets full of stuff, by category, that hikers have left behind, including clothes) along the way if you are not picky and are able to eat massive amounts of instant potatoes. I recommend sending yourself food at those locations. You'll get exactly what you need. You can buy some things, but it will be very expensive. Fuel is quite pricey.

2. Mosquitos aren't the concern in terms of campsite location. They will be everywhere when they are out so location makes no diff. They tend to congregate in greenery but will come find you on rocky high passes. Camp not in the bottoms, or on the tops of ridges, but somewhere in between, and it will be less likely that you will be very cold (the bottoms), or have your stuff blown away (the ridge tops). Camp away from heavily used places, and you have a better chance of not being awakened 2-3 times at night by bears bugging the canisters. Also less chance of being awakened by yahoos (people are rude). The JMT is not exactly what I would call a hike for solitude seekers. The horse packers will bring in groups of 20. Once we ended up off trail at a small lake on the map, only to find five generations of a family complete with ice chests, lawn chairs, a cabana tent, and small children underfoot - the fishing sucked, and the evening and night were full of babies crying and yelling. A horse packer had brought them in and left them for the week.

3. Fishing is dicey. The lakes are no longer stocked in the parks and if you are looking for trophy trout, you won't find them out there. I've fished parts of it and sometimes it's quite good, particularly in the San Joaquin (goldens and browns) and sometimes you get skunked.

4. You would be better renting cans from Wild Ideas by mail, if you want the lightest canister with the most volume. It's an art to pack a bear canister with a week of food.  There are articles about that - I suggest googling for those. I don't know how much *you* can get in it- depends on what you take and how you pack it. I could get a week's worth in a rental garcia, but I have been using a canister for a long time, and am willing to tailor food preferences to the task - I eat a lot of couscous based or rice based meals when packing canisters. And the garcia is a heavy canister besides.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
steve t Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 496
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 8:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For me, i prefer predictability.  So advise planning and "caching" your resupplies.  Can leave a food bag in the parking lot at Tuolumne meadow (or maybe even leave with the store).  Then a 2nd at Reds (I dropped a food cache at Red's for my JMT hiking on my drive from Phoenix to Yosemite).

After Red's you can then resupply again at Vermillion or MTR (or both).  Even if no resupply I recommend a stop over at Vermillion, or getting a one night stay at MTR.  After that on a 3 week hike you have a long haul and a big food load.

To resupply after that, the cheapest option is a hike out to Onion Valley and thumb to Independence where you arranged for someone to hold a package for you, or a bit more risky you left something in the bear box at the Onion Valley parking lot.  I haven't tried this, but one of the hiker shuttles might take $$ to drop something off, or (pricey) you can have a packer meet you at the JMT/Kearsarge/Charlottle Lake Jct with the care pkg).

Too many words, but the short answer to your question is yes to can buy food along the way, scrounge at Vermillion and MTR, etc.  Food options, and variety are what they are.  If you are in the least picky, then I advise prepping your own resupplies and using the above options to supplement as you might find something that after several days on the trail looks too good to pass up.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
Painter Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 129
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 22 2013, 8:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoWest @ Jan. 09 2013, 4:31 pm)
QUOTE
So is it too risky to count on using the leftover food in the barrel at MTR? Seems very expensive to ship a bucket and I keep hearing about the abundant food barrel.

My experience was yes, there was plenty of food in the buckets at MTR but most was stuff people had packaged themselves. Not much in the way of Mountain House although there was some. Plenty of other essentials though like bandaids, some types of pain relievers, deodorant, toothpaste and such..

I guess what I'm getting at is I wouldn't personally recommend counting on there being enough of or the types of foods you'll want for the final leg of the trip. Mail yourself a bucket full of things you like and you'll be much happier than picking through the leftovers.

I hope you have a safe and wonderful trip!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
ndwoods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 499
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 23 2013, 11:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I usually get 9 days food in my canister...I repackage everything! And on a super long trip tortilla shells are my "sandwich bread" just cuz they take so little room...store so nicely.

--------------
http://ndeewoods.com/
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 16
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 02 2013, 10:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I faxed in my permit application and am now holding my breath and crossing fingers.

Now my hiking partner/daughter is applying for a year-long "dream job" internship after graduation and may not be going with me.  So I may be looking for another partner or staying home.....


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 12:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That reaction is understandable but as someone who solos routinely I'd suggest that since you've apparently blocked out the time already consider just doing it. With modern materials a soloist isn't that weight inefficient and the simple reality is on the John Muir Trail in particular you're not really very "alone". Though by choosing your campsite a little off the beaten path (usually higher or a bit further from water) solitude is available.

It's a special and very grand adventure. Since you write you'd do it with a stranger (what I get out of your post) why ever not do it solo? Is my two cents.

Besides you're laying out and prepping your gear for the permit you have in hand makes the choice between two realities rather than a more  theoretical backpack and the position.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 3:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Got my permit!! WOO-HOO!!
Even my first choice at that.  Thanks for your recommendation HighSierraFan, if my daughter doesn't go, I may go it alone or try to get some family members to do a portion of it.  More planning........


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 3:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You can also leave this casually about where she would come across it....

[Insert evi laugh]

http://www.amazon.com/Walk-Sk....r+trail

"Walk the Sky": they got the title right.

Congrats on the first choice! I assume that means Happy Isles? While that's more of a psychological thing for a route such as the John Muir Trail as a through hike it's those psychological details that complete the experience aren't they?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2051
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 7:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you stay home I will personally contract with the the ghost of John Muir to drag chains through your attic.

Congratulations! Not many get the permit let alone their first choice.  And a solo experience is wonderful too.  You get to choose who your 'partners' are on a day to day buffet selection of nice people.  You either walk faster or slower on a day to get a new gatherings of smiles.

Your daughter might miss it, but I thought you were in for a penny in for a pound.

Do it from the south next time and have a completely different experience with her.

You had best be working on being as fit as your age will let you be.


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 12 2013, 7:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well I certainly don't want John Muir's ghost in my attic!

I may go solo, but I really want to go with my daughter since she'll probably get married next year and our hiking trips together will be over.

I run several times a week, hike, and lift wts, I hope that's enough!


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
150mph Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 03 2013, 5:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Like HSFan & SPeacock, I'd recommend going it alone, like I did a couple of summers ago, south to north. You'll meet plenty of other solo hikers. The last thing you want is a last-minute partner to mess up your rhythym ala A Walk in the Woods.

My $.02:
- Obsess about working out - preferably in your hiking shoes. You'll be glad you did.
- For me, the sketchiest parts of soloing were the car drop and the 3 bigger river crossings - Bear, S.Fork KIngs, Evolution. (There are easier ways than following everyone else).
- I'd also leave the fishing gear for a separate trip - every extra pound carried up those nine passes will feel like 10.
- Plan on tons of mosquitoes wherever there's water, even in Aug. - then you won't mind leaving your extra spray at one of the resupplies should you get a break. Mosquito net = survival.
- I called Red's Mdw. just before I set out to make sure they had plenty of denatured alcohol for my stove on hand. When I got there, they were out & I had to ration.
- I suggest buying a bear can and getting to know its full weight, packability and quirks intimately. I like Bear Vault, but the knob system can be human-proof too if you don't practice.

My JMT page at PlanetRambler.com has tons of pics & info you may find helpful. Warning - spoiler alert. Good luck!


--------------
PlanetRambler.com Photos, trip reports & maps of my hikes in California and the Western USA
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 23
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 8:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks 150mph.
Turns out my daughter did not get the internship and will be able to go with me after all-which is great.

I'm already buying lots of freeze-dried foods - I love the lightweight simplicity of boiling two cups and eating out of the bag.
I have a headnet, but hoping the skeeters are gone by when we're there.

My plan was to rent a bear can at Yosemite since I don't need one very often and they're pricey to buy. Hate that they weigh so much, but they're required.

I've looking over itineraries for camping spots and mileages and wonder if its better to plan a specific camping spot each night or just 'wing it' and see how it goes - any tips here?


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1680
Joined: Mar. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 8:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Always wing it. You don't want to either limit yourself or be slave to an itinerary when surrounded by so much beauty.

Your chances of finishing the whole thing with your daughter along drop dramatically - that's just how it works. Decide early what's really important.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 9:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoWest @ Apr. 04 2013, 5:14 am)
QUOTE
.....
I've looking over itineraries for camping spots and mileages and wonder if its better to plan a specific camping spot each night or just 'wing it' and see how it goes - any tips here?

A bit depends on whether you want a lot of company each night. What's obvious on a map is obviious to everyone doing that route.....

Maybe keep the approximate mileage to keep your day count and food needs on track but leave open for opportunites where within that general goal you'll set up. Me? I head high, loses both the bugs and the people.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
SPeacock Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2051
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 5:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A 10 mile day is a good goal especially at the beginning.  If you feel like going farther - push it.  Or slack off a bit if the altitude is giving you a problem.  The key is that you can't take many slack days unless they are part of the plan.  The first three days should be slow anyway to give your body a chance to keep up.  Most seem to be a bit optimistic on what they can comfortably do each day.

Within a week you will be able to push that mileage up.  Then re-plan your food requirements.  At 1.5 mph you can cover a lot of trail by lunch.

You will be consuming more food the last 8 days than you will the first 8 because you will be covering more miles per day.

Stay with the 'crowd' the first couple of days.  That will mean going to spots that have food storage lockers.  The convenience is nice even if you don't want crowds.  Most of THAT crowd will be good to hang out with tho. Make sure YOUR food sacks are easy to spot in low light conditions.  A storage locker can look intimidating with a bazillion food bags all jumbled up.

Check to make sure.  I think you both have to have canisters.  Renting a big Berikade is also an option.

If you go freeze dried, be sure to try the various brands at home first.

Repackage all of the food to get rid of extra packaging (you have to pack it out, remember).  Use a straw in a plastic bag to suck out extra space before you pinch it and secure the top.  Don't forget the instructions and what is in there.  Take fresh food things that will keep 24 hours the first day.  Might as well enjoy it while you can.  Don't eat a lot of the same food even if it is your favorite.  It won't be when you get out the other end.

Plan some time to go off the JMT and see why they put the JMT where they did.  The JMT is really the access to the Sierra - not the goal.

Is your daughter as fit as you are?


--------------
Experience as well as wisdom, at times, is foolishly acquired.
To understand why details matter, you first need to notice them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 04 2013, 7:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

?

Little Yosemite valley, Sunrise Lakes, Tuolumne Meadows, Lyell Base Camp
Climb out of the valley carrying only 3 days of food...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
GoWest Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 8:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all the advice! I am considering it all.

My tentative plans now are to resupply at Reds Meadow and MTR and stay one night at each place (motel and tent cabin).  I'll eat supper and breakfast at Tuolomne, Reds, and MTR to save on carrying that food.

Since we want to climb Half Dome and Clouds Rest, we'll start off slow with low miles to acclimate, and give ourselves five days to get to Reds.
We both plan on renting bear cans at Yosemite.

My daughter is running some while at college, after she graduates (May 3) and is back home, I'll stay on her about exercising and getting more fit.

Our pace is about 10 miles per day which should give us time to loaf and explore on some days. I hope to climb Split Mtn and explore Sixty Lakes Basin if time allows, and do a little fishing. I'm only carrying a telescoping spinning rod n reel with a small box of lures-not too much extra wt.

On the freeze-dried meals, I have about five different brands and all different meals. I have pondered removing the contents and putting them in lighter plastic bags and re-using the foil packets to heat and eat out of-how well does that work?


--------------
Kiss my days, light up my nights.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42742
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 10:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The packets would be very hard to impossible to clean thoroughly given their folds at the base. Better to either use freezer bags and add water to them or lighter bags and rehydrate in a pot you can clean.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
beantownR6 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 87
Joined: Mar. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 05 2013, 11:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoWest @ Apr. 05 2013, 8:52 am)
QUOTE
On the freeze-dried meals, I have about five different brands and all different meals. I have pondered removing the contents and putting them in lighter plastic bags and re-using the foil packets to heat and eat out of-how well does that work?

you should think about dehydrating your own food, and getting a vacum sealer.  i am dehydrating all my suppers for my trip for the 2 of us, and thats 42 meals, and if i have more time fruit leathers and some breakfast stuff.  you will save money and get more food with less sodium.  ive owned my dehydrator for years so its already offset the cost, but just got a vacum sealer and its awesome.  all you need to do is boil water in a pot with the dehydrated food, it takes longer though than freeze dried food but tasted much better.

this site is great http://www.backpackingchef.com/ and ive made the corn crab chowder and bbq beef stew but i added more veggies.  (the bbq beef stew is awesome, both trail tested)  I also bought a food dehydrator cook book.

i have my own chili recipe,  i cood beans in a pressure cooker and dry them and also add pasta to it

i have a meat sauce + pasta recipe.  

my chili before drying

dried chili, dried beans and dried orzo pasta

one 1000 calorie meal, weighs 12 ounces with packaging.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
66 replies since Dec. 30 2012, 9:41 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 3123>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply JMT questions
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions