SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 212>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: How to Hike in the Heat?, Should we stop and wait out the heat?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Surfer Bill Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Jan. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2013, 9:38 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am the executive officer of a Boy Scout troop that went out on a one night local backpacking trip to train for a 50 mile Mount Whitney excursion. They camped Friday night at Blue Jay campground off of Ortega Highway in Orange County. They planned on hiking from Blue Jay campground to Robinson Ranch area. They thought there was a clearly marked trail but when they got there they could not find the trail. They talk to a Ranger who said to take the Los Pinos trail back to Ortega Highway, which they did. They said they were so hot from hiking and lacking water (started with 3 liters each) that they decided to "wait out the heat" and rest. They had no cell phone coverage and some of the parents became very concerned and one called the sheriff who called in a helicopter rescue unit. They were never any serious trouble and arrived tired, thirsty and hungry at the trailhead about 8 PM last night. Would love any of you experts to share advice on how to avoid these problems in the future.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1680
Joined: Mar. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2013, 10:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Seems pretty simple to me - the leaders need to know the trails better. Sounds like waiting out the heat was the smart thing to do once they had gotten into trouble. The parents need to be instructed not to call SAR before it even gets dark.


I'd also recommend doing some of these shake-down hikes at higher elevations if you really want to know how the boys will perform near Whitney.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2615
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2013, 11:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Jun. 02 2013, 10:24 am)
QUOTE
Seems pretty simple to me - the leaders need to know the trails better. Sounds like waiting out the heat was the smart thing to do once they had gotten into trouble. The parents need to be instructed not to call SAR before it even gets dark.

+1

In a nutshell, better planning.

You asked "how to hike in the heat?" but, imo, a better plan for the group you described would be to plan an itinerary that avoids hiking in the heat.


--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
tarol Search for posts by this member.
Well I never!
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 11041
Joined: Mar. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2013, 3:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Better planning for sure - I would recommend that the leaders scout out any new trail first.  And please do plan on hiking during the fall/winter/spring - summertime in that area is very warm.  Yesterday was the first really hot day of the year and the hike should've been called off.  If you want to hike in the summer, go up in elevation towards San Jacinto or San Gorgonio!

--------------
Got elevation? www.tarol.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 5
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2013, 5:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What is the planned route in the Sierra?

Tips for there could come in handy.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5536
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 03 2013, 10:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've hiked in 100+ temps... one time. Stopping and resting in the shade and eating and drinking as I went along were mandatory. I'm not really acclimated to that kind of heat, and don't generally have to be since I go high in summer to avoid it when hiking.

I would say research and figure out the conditions under which you will be making that backpacking trip, and doing short hikes often under similar conditions where possible. Research and have the scouts learn about symptoms of heat exhaustion and stroke, and get everyone on the same page - when something happens, we do the right thing even if it means the end of the trip.

So yes, what is the planned itinerary?


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12388
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 03 2013, 10:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have hiked in 100*+ heat a couple of times, and it is nothing I would expose kids to.  I would not want to be responsible for other people's kids.  Adults are supposed to be responsible for themselves, but I can tell you from experience that it is not the case in that kind of heat.  Everyone needs to be looking out for each other, and the consequences of not doing so can haunt you for years.  That is with adults.   With kids, I would just not do it.  

--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 12:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Btw dehydration isn't at all restricted to "hot" routes. Up at the higher elevations of the Sierra the very dry air combined with the deep and rapid breathing people perform to compensate for the reduced amount of oxygen while their body is actually needing more oxygen as they work harder carrying a load up the steep paths means losing body water even on what feels like a cool day.


So learning about dehydration and how to prevent it has its place for any route in the mountains. I'll keep hydrated while Nordic skiing just as diligently as for an August climb up to a Sierra Crest pass. Around Whitney you're not hiking in the heat, you're hiking in "the dry". Though there are trailheads, such as Symmes Creek road end that would certainly start in the heat. But most are higher than that one.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23579
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 2:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Jun. 03 2013, 10:14 pm)
QUOTE
I have hiked in 100*+ heat a couple of times, and it is nothing I would expose kids to.  I would not want to be responsible for other people's kids.  Adults are supposed to be responsible for themselves, but I can tell you from experience that it is not the case in that kind of heat.  Everyone needs to be looking out for each other, and the consequences of not doing so can haunt you for years.  That is with adults.   With kids, I would just not do it.  

I agree.  I hike in that sort of heat a couple times a year, and I've backpacked at 110+.  Doing so safely requires being finely attuned to your own physical and mental state, and there's much less margin for error than in more benign conditions.  A situation can go bad quickly, and when it does, no one present will be totally fresh and unimpaired by the heat.

I place special emphasis on "your own" physical and mental state because it's far more difficult to adequately judge someone else's, especially a kid's.

In any case, when the chips are really down, hiking is not the thing to do.  Waiting out the heat is often a darn good idea.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
nogods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6219
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 7:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Apparently, being young and hydrated isn't enough by itself to protect from heat stroke:

Man, 21, dies from heat while hiking in White Tank Mountains

QUOTE
The three hikers had started the 10-mile hike at around 6:30 a.m. and were on the last leg when Rodriguez, who was wearing black jeans, said he was not feeling well and his legs "would not work."

His companions gave him water, but he collapsed and lost consciousness. His friends administered CPR until paramedics arrived and took over.

The paramedics said Rodriguez was hot to the touch. They also said he had a spontaneous pulse and agonal respirations. They were not able to revive him.

The other hikers told deputies that they had been hydrating the entire way and said that they had hiked the same trail before.


The contact person needs top call SAR at the agreed time.  The contact person should not second guess ("maybe they got delayed...maybe they decided to spend the night...").  

Perhaps their mistake was not letting the parents know that they had a cushion of time before which any SAR call should be made ("we expect to be done by 5 but take as long as 8"), but when they expected to be out by whatever time is given, that is when the call should made.  The emergency contact has no way of knowing whether the delay is life threatening or not.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
Surfer Bill Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Jan. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 11:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all the posts on this. This forum is an incredible resource! As far as the itinerary for Mount Whitney, I will not be going on that trip personally so will have to get back to on that. However, I am taking a group of Venture Scouts (16-17-year-olds) on a trip to Havasupai Falls June 24-27. The plan is to drive from Orange County, California, to the trailhead on Monday, June 24, camp overnight, leave early and hike in on Tuesday, June 25, spend some time at the falls that afternoon/evening and the following day, Wednesday, June 26, hike out early Thursday morning, June 27 and drive back to Orange County California Thursday afternoon/evening. Not sure about making the drive back after hiking out the same day. I also understand that is about a 10 mile hike each way and the average temperature for that time of year is a high of about 100° F and we will need to be ready for that. Any tips, advice and suggestions would be greatly appreciated, especially from those who have been there.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 12:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Start the hike before dawn. Way before dawn. And make sure everyone is taking bathroom breaks at least once an hour no matter how much they say they're drinking: no urination means they're not drinking enough (and people underestimate how much they need in dry dangerously hot conditions such as those will be all the time).

There's a saying from the bike world, if you're thirsty it's too late (meaning in that case a loss of power and mental acuity).
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
Born to hike, forced to work ...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 7107
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 12:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hundred degree heat?  Light clothing both in color and weight, ... stuff that's breezy (I use an Australian hat with mesh for dedicated desert hiking).  Won't need a lot of gear but will need way more water.  Lots of water, maybe some electrolytes, food that's edible in the heat. Acclimate everybody.  Do some dayhikes in the sun, don't run the A/C back home.  Avoid the heat of the day with maybe a late lunch if time is a factor (remember the setting sun is also hot).

--------------
Usually Southwest and then some.

In wildness is the preservation of the world. - Henry Thoreau
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 12:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SW Mtn backpacker @ Jun. 04 2013, 9:17 am)
QUOTE
Hundred degree heat?  Light clothing both in color and weight.  Won't need a lot of gear but will need way more water.  Acclimate.  Do some dayhikes in the sun, don't run the A/C back home.  Avoid the heat of the day with maybe a late lunch if time is a factor (remember the setting sun is also hot).

Yes, full coverage, no short sleeve or tank tops. Direct sunlight is a radient heater as will be all the sunlit rock surfaces that have been heated to substantially higher than the air temperature, mid one hundreds can be common for surfaces in direct sunlight.

Also keep a close eye on people's faces and behavior checking for the early signs of heat injury.:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heat-exhaustion/DS01046/TAB=indepth

and

How to avoid heat-related illnesses:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/exercise/HQ00316/NSECTIONGROUP=2
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5536
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 12:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For a trip that hot when you know already that's going to be the anticipated temps - I take them somewhere else. As mentioned above , the fact that it's somebody else's kids would be my boundary point . I have a tough enough time getting adults 30 to 40 years old to pay attention to the symptoms of heat exhaustion .

--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12388
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 2:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It will be hotter than that.  Seriously.  I was on a trip in mid May, 6 yrs ago, where it was 105* in the shade, and there wasn't any to be found.  10 miles in those conditions is a death trap waiting for anyone to falter just a little.  I am very serious.  You may be fortunate and not have problems with the kids on one trip, but the risk is too high for my tastes.  Do that trip over Thanksgiving.  

If it must be done in late June, hike in the dark.  Start both hikes about 3 AM.  Know that it will take longer on the way up, unless your hikers are very strong, or determined.   Use headlamps, and hiking / trekking poles.  The kids will get a charge out of hiking at night, and that time of June the sun will come up about 5, and you will have a waning moon, but it will be setting before you start hiking.

I'd start hiking, then take a short break for a protein bar or 2 about an hour in.  10 minute break every hour.  Might be able to complete it in 5 hours, which would put you at the falls around 8 - 9 AM depending on the length of your breaks.  After that, it only gets hotter and more miserable.  Make sure you are off the trail between 10 AM and 7 PM.   Sunset will be nearly 8.


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
nogods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6219
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 4:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I agree - change the plans.  Not a good situation.

HEAT STROKE CAUSED DEATH OF WOMAN HIKING NEAR JULIAN, AUTHORITIES SAY

QUOTE
A 19-year-old hiker died from heat stroke after being rescued Monday near Cedar Creek Falls south of Julian, where temperatures soared into the 90s this week, authorities said Wednesday.

Lynn Thu Tran, who lived with her family in Escondido, was hiking about 5:30 p.m. off Eagle Peak Road when she felt ill. She was found unconscious and airlifted to a hospital, where she died, sheriff’s officials said.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1680
Joined: Mar. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 9:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm thinking how nice the Golden Trout Wilderness will be in the end of June...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2013, 11:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Jun. 04 2013, 6:51 pm)
QUOTE
I'm thinking how nice the Golden Trout Wilderness will be in the end of June...

Hoorah: Summer is coming early to the Sierra that's for sure. The Merced's flow is about half or less of seasonal averages....
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?site_no=11264500

Humphreys Basin, yum.

http://www.summitpost.org/humphreys-basin/568246

North Lake:Piute Pass trail has permits available, 18 for a Sunday(23) start, 9 for Monday(24).
http://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea....ctid=30
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23579
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 1:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(nogods @ Jun. 04 2013, 7:03 am)
QUOTE
Apparently, being young and hydrated isn't enough by itself to protect from heat stroke:

Man, 21, dies from heat while hiking in White Tank Mountains

There is at least one shady oasis in the White Tanks.  However, apart from that and a few other isolated spots, the rest of the range is brutally exposed and fiendishly hot.  (And temps are about 10 degrees above average this week).
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
Surfer Bill Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Jan. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 12:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

From a friend of mine regarding a trip to Havasupai:
I took a group of older Boy Scouts two years ago and went exactly the same week you are going. Start your hike in as early as possible. At 9 miles you will hit the resort were there is a store and you can buy drinks and snacks, stay there for awhile and then hike the next 2.5 miles to camp. When you hike out leave no later then 4am. We had 1 Adult and  1 youth who got sick from the heat. the key is start hydrating 1 week before you leave. Take plenty of water and hike as light as possible. Its a wonderful trip. The waterfalls are amazing. The scenery is awesome. I never slept in my sleeping bag at night it was too hot. be careful to not swim upstream to close to the waterfalls that equals death,.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 12:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"We had 1 Adult and  1 youth who got sick from the heat."

Such a ringing endoresment, of the Sierra....


All that "wondeful" waterfalls and "amazing" scenery will be there when you're not subjected to potentially life threatening heat conditions.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5536
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 1:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So is this a survival test, or a backpacking trip? As a search and rescue volunteer it is disturbing to me that people getting sick and being that close to disaster is not taken more seriously.  Heat issues are not something to take lightly!

--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
Surfer Bill Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Jan. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 8:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(AlmostThere @ Jun. 05 2013, 1:04 pm)
QUOTE
So is this a survival test, or a backpacking trip? As a search and rescue volunteer it is disturbing to me that people getting sick and being that close to disaster is not taken more seriously.  Heat issues are not something to take lightly!

This is a backpacking trip not a survival test. I have heard from many different people over the years how beautiful Havasupai is and highly recommend it. I've been told that the average high temperature in June is 101° and we need to properly hydrate, hike in the "off-peak" hours, wear proper clothing, watch for signs of heat stroke/heat exhaustion, etc., but that it is very doable and well worth the effort. One of our advisors has spent several weeks in a survival program in the desert and is training us. I would appreciate any references to third-party publications online or otherwise specifically advising against this hike more precautions in making the hike, if you are aware of any. For example, the National Park Service for the Grand Canyon has an excellent article regarding hiking in the desert heat here: http://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/hike-smart.htm.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 8:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"Every year, scores of unprepared hikers, lured by initially easy downhill hiking, experience severe illness, injury, or death from hiking in the canyon."

"WATCH OUT FOR THESE HEALTH HAZARDS!

HEAT EXHAUSTION - The result of dehydration due to intense sweating. Hikers can lose one or two quarts (liters) of water per hour. Rangers at Phantom Ranch and Indian Garden treat many cases of heat exhaustion each day in summer.

Symptoms: pale face, nausea, vomiting, cool and moist skin, headache, cramps.

Treatment: drink water with electrolytes, eat high-energy foods (with fats and sugars), rest in the shade for 30-45 minutes, and cool the body by getting wet.


HEATSTROKE - A life-threatening emergency where the body's heat regulating mechanisms become overwhelmed by a combination of internal heat production and environmental demands. Your body loses its ability to cool itself. Grand Canyon has two to three cases of heatstroke a year. Untreated heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke.

Symptoms: flushed face, dry skin, weak and rapid pulse, high core body temperature, confusion, poor judgment or inability to cope, unconsciousness, seizures.

Treatment: the heatstroke victim must be cooled immediately! Continuously pour water on the victim's head and torso, fan to create an evaporative cooling effect. Immerse the victim in cold water if possible. Move the victim to shade and remove excess clothing. The victim needs evacuation to a hospital. Someone should go for help while attempts to cool the victim continue.


HYPONATREMIA (water intoxication) - An illness that mimics the early symptoms of heat exhaustion. It is the result of low sodium in the blood caused by drinking too much water and losing too much salt through sweating.

Symptoms: nausea, vomiting, altered mental states, confusion, frequent urination. The victim may appear intoxicated. In extreme cases seizures may occur.

Treatment: have the victim eat salty foods, slowly drink sports drinks with electrolytes, and rest in the shade. If mental alertness decreases, seek immediate help."

Again a ringing Sierra endorsement.

But hey, target's locked and loaded.

So a final tip: carry, and be familiar with the operation of, an FCC certified Personal Locator Beacon.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
High_Sierra_Fan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 42794
Joined: Aug. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 9:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here's the international system the PLBs participate in.

http://www.cospas-sarsat.org/
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12388
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 10:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Indian Gardens, shady and with running water, is running 99* during the day.  Phantom Ranch, closer to similar temps to where you are headed, is already 107* during days.  Overnight lows are close to 70*.  

Take care, and keep a close eye on everyone.  Have 2 folks designated to keep an eye on you.  If you can hike at night, at least 3-4 hours of early morning hiking, it will help with the heat.  Check back in when you get back, OK?  I would be interested in hearing a Trip Report on this trip.  I wish you well.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5536
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2013, 11:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Take a SAT phone. They rent them...

Does anyone in your group have wilderness first aid training? Not the basic first aid... wilderness specific. Not survival training...


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12388
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 12:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am not convinced the SAT phone would do any good in this instance.  If heat is the issue, it takes them 2 hours from the time they get notified until they can get the bird in the air.  Still, it would be good to use for any non life threatening injury I guess.

It only takes 45 minutes for heat stroke to kill, especially in that kind of heat.  I am just hoping he gets those hikers going by 2-3 AM, so they stand a good chance of having a good time.  


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5536
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 1:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm never convinced that electronics are much good, but a SAT phone would be an improvement over SPOT or PLB in that the details could be communicated effectively and quickly... advice could even be obtained, maybe.

In any case, I as always hope that everything goes well and good fortune and fortitude win the day.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
55 replies since Jun. 02 2013, 9:38 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 212>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply How to Hike in the Heat?
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions