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Topic: High Sierra Trail Photos, Pictures from our trip in early July< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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RyanJL Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 11:21 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello,

Earlier this month, my wife and I completed the High Sierra Trail.  We are from Delaware and it was our first time on the west coast.  We have backpacked a lot on the east, but never anything like this.  We had an amazing time and I just wanted to share the pictures.  

https://www.facebook.com/media....d216568

Feel free to friend me on FB if you'd like.  We had an amazing time.  We were unable to summit Mt. Whitney at the end because of a freak (does this happen usually??!) snow storm that we were unprepared for on our final day.

I also just wanted to THANK everyone that responded to a message I posted in early 2013 as I was planning our trip.  There were a lot of details to cover to get to the trail and everyone in this community was very helpful - again, THANK YOU to anyone that responded to my previous posts that gave trip advice.

Anyone interested in visiting the trail, I am happy to answer any questions.  You can email me at ryanjl@udel.edu or respond to this message.

Happy hiking!

-Ryan
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toejam Search for posts by this member.
the high road is hard to find
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 8:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great pictures! Looks like you had a good time in CA. I'm glad it went well.
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RyanJL Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 10:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks!  When we were at Hamilton Lake, we had a pretty funny run-in with a deer.  We were eating dinner about 100 feet from our camp at the shore of the lake.  When we were done and walking back to the tent to clean up (there was no food or anything out at our tent), we had a deer going through our stuff.  When I approached, she started to run off - with our camera in its mouth!  She dropped it about 30 feet away.  She had been sucking the salt off the strap.  Upon closer inspection, she had sucked on our pole straps and my wife's shorts, which were out drying.  Everything was covered in deer mucus!  It was hilarious, though gross.  She stalked us out for the rest of the night to try to get another salty snack! :)  We were able to get some good pictures of her.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 3:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That deer business is funny. I've had them wake me up around Mehrten from their midnight LOUD snacking on manzanita.

Too bad the snow kept you off the summit, it has some great views off to the north especially. But yes, common enough. I've been snowed on in August a lot lower down along Milestone Creek and have talked to rangers about hypothermia deaths being carried off Whitney in mid-summer from snowstorms. Mainly from trying to walk out wet.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2013, 12:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yeah, the deer were really funny.  She came back around in the middle of the night and woke us up

As for snow, that's crazy!  I was sad we couldn't make it, but it wasn't worth the risk in the cold.  We were prepared for cold weather, but not for cold wet weather.  So many people were turning around on the other side of the ridge and were surprised we had made it as high as we did.

Oh - and a few people here recommended hitchhiking out of the Whitney Portal.  We did this and got picked up immediately - second car that went by picked us up.  Two nice guys that drove us straight to our hotel.

High Sierra Trail was my first "long" trail at 70 miles.  I'm hooked!  Already thinking about next year and will try to plan one for around 100 miles. Open to suggestions...
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tarol Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2013, 4:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nice pics :)  The first part of my first (serious) backpacking trip was along the High Sierra Trail - we hiked from Crescent Meadow to Mineral King.  Anyway, your photos brought back memories...



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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2013, 8:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nice photos and it looks like a great time, thanks for the link.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 18 2013, 5:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

These photos are amazing!  I want to go next summer, and I was about to post asking for advice on it.  Would you be willing to exchange some info with me?  I'm concerned about permit process and transportation to and from the trailhead.  I'll be soloing.
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toejam Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 10:21 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm hiking part of the HST solo next week, with the twist that I'm hiking a loop out of Mineral King. I haven't reserved a permit and don't expect to have a problem. And I don't have to worry about a 300-mile shuttle. I frankly think hiking the HST one way is a bad idea because you'll spend most of two days shuttling when you could be hiking.

There are a bazillion hikes in the Sierra that are just as spectacular as the HST and logistically much easier, but haven't been featured in national publications. Here's a link to a good site for research:

http://www.highsierratopix.com/community/index.php
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 2:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Travel is probably easier for someone who has no need to return at all to the trailhead.

I had friends drop me off and simply grabbed a bus back to San Diego. From further afield a flight into Reno would work coupled with AMTRAK and the Eastern Sierra Transit Authority busses.

OR, and it's probably my favorite: just hike the High Sierra Trail only, and once at the summit (It "ends" on the top of Whitney) head back west, loop up to Lake South America and then down that other side of the Kern drainage below Mt. Genevra etc. and exit over Colby and out to some section of the Sequoia Shuttle system for a return to Crescent Meadow and the car,
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 25 2013, 6:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd vote for round trip by High Sierra Fan, ( a grand traverse that)  but that is a long haul unsupported.  Alternative to do it from the east side and resupply at the Post Office (sent to self at General Mail) out of Crescent Meadows at the park then return to the Portal.  If you can't get a permit starting on Whitney from the Portal, you might get a permit from Cottonwood Lakes (Lone Pine also) or Shepherd Pass (Independence) and do Whitney from the west to 'start' the HST.

It would be a relatively easy hitch from Onion Valley (Kearsarge/Shepherd Pass near Independence CA) to the Portal above Lone Pine.  Or hire somebody to pick you up.

It will take two days to recover your car where ever you leave it for a one way trip on the HST.

Once on the trail you can generally spend a night when you feel you've done a days worth of walking or sight seeing.  Unless they change the rules you don't need to have all of your food in a personal canister so long as you will spend nights that have safe storage in the bear cans provided.  Check both on locations of bear cans on your trip and if ok to not have all your food in your canister.  You can get a lot of food in a Berikade Expedition. You can rent those from http://www.wild-ideas.net/


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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2013, 1:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

DCHIKER - email me at ryanjohnlawrence@gmail.com and I'd be happy to go into more details about my trip.  HST was absolutely amazing - despite everything I read about it being a nightmare to plan, it wasn't too bad. BUT - we didn't want to return to the trailhead.  We flew into Visalia, next day got the cheap shuttle into Sequoia and grabbed our permit, next day hit the trail.  When we hiked out, we stayed in Lone Pine for a night and then took a bus to a nearby city to rent a car - then we headed to San Diego for few days.

In most of the areas that we camped at, there were bear lockers.

Also, I wouldn't recommend hiking from Whitney Portal to Crescent Meadow, only because the first 11 miles to the summit of Whitney Portal would be brutal (though I know many do this).  Email me for more information - happy to chat!
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2013, 1:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

SPeacock- That direction would totally make more sense. The food load for that route adds up, especially when done right: i.e. slowly.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 31 2013, 4:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Unfortunately, with the exception of dragging along a pack train, it is almost impossible to do that part of the Sierra too slowly.

Many years ago, I came across a 'trail bum'.  He'd not left the HST, JMT area the entire summer (then Sept).   He lived off the extra food left at the bear boxes and bumming food from those along the trail (bear got his food, etc).  His method was to put a twist tie marker on the bags of food then check every couple of days or so to see if they had been picked up.  He said he was helping to 'enforce' the rule of no long term storage in the boxes, and also to keep from having the left over food being cleaned up by rangers.  Waste not, want not.

He was one scruffy looking gent.  His 1960's era frame pack looked home made and had 1" straps to hold it on.  He appeared to only own one trouser and shirt and with no hat his skin was the color and texture of a nut husk.  Interesting feller, I'd have cooked him a dinner to spend some time with him.  

He had to have a story. He lead a risky life living on trail GORP.


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