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Topic: Gear for canyon hiking/scrambling, anyone carry slings?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 2:09 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am planning a post-christmas, high desert, dayhiking and car-camping group outing, something has become sort of an annual tradition for my small hiking group. At least one of the hikes I am considering will be a canyon hike that should involve some easy to moderate scrambling, avoiding the hikes known to require difficult climbing. However, a couple members of the group are little bit shaky even with pretty moderate scrambling. One simply suffers from poor motivation and kind of drags the group's capability down on a number of levels but the other member does have some physical and related confidence issues, though has been improving considerably. I've read references to some hikers bringing long webbing slings on such hikes and intend on bringing one as a climbing aide/confidence booster, but am wondering what one does if a good, natural anchor cannot be found? Do those of you that carry slings also bring along rock climbing "pro?" Or does someone at the top act as the anchor, holding the sling for the climber to hold on to? Obviously, the belayer would have to let go if the up-bound hiker falls and hangs onto the sling.  I did a fair amount of technical rock climbing in my youth, many years ago, but Ebayed my rack a long time ago. I am considering picking up a couple larger stoppers or hexes or something, but am wondering if this would really be worthwhile?
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 3:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If the climber is holding onto the sling isn't that one less hand available for, well, climbing?

I'd think maybe 50 feet of lighter rope might serve a more useful role, tie them in to leave both hands free and give a belayer options on positioning for safety. If you wanted to sling the belayer to an anchor, that might be dictated by terrain, but that would be determined by what's at the site. Hardware might be useless while webbing to loop around a rock or tree might be just the thing.

Counting on the belayer letting go just when the climber needs them sounds both unrealistic and dangerous. Either it's a real belay or don't do it and let the climbers in question do their own thing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 4:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HSF, I may have overemphasized the technical climbing aspects. I'm mainly after using a well secured handline to help out someone who often has trouble with Class 2-3 type scrambling. I would anticipate that individual to want to stop in the Class 4 range  with any exposure. The person I am referring to spent most of his 25+ year adult life obese and sedentary, until recently, and seems to be so unaccustomed to using his body physically that he sometimes lacks confidence in more unusual and demanding situations.  He hikes more like a reasonably fit elderly person even though he's probably now in the best shape of anyone in the group. A few times in the past, I've extended a trekking pole for him to hold onto, that has worked well enough, but I think rigging up a good handline if needed might extend what he is able and willing to do. I can see it also coming in handy for downclimbing, which occasionally challenges the rest of us in the group as well.

50 ft of rope and a sling (or two) as you suggest makes sense and should be a versatile.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 9:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

7mm-8mm line. Bowline under the arms and a belayer on top. Maybe an anchor for the belayer, which could be as simple as a piece of rope run around a boulder.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 9:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Montanalonewolf @ Dec. 01 2013, 6:45 pm)
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7mm-8mm line. Bowline under the arms and a belayer on top. Maybe an anchor for the belayer, which could be as simple as a piece of rope run around a boulder.

MLW- dynamic or static rope? Static would offer firmer support perhaps (certainly better than the old goldline) but dynamic would be similar at the sort of conditions described...
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 03 2013, 3:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Dec. 01 2013, 9:50 pm)
QUOTE

(Montanalonewolf @ Dec. 01 2013, 6:45 pm)
QUOTE
7mm-8mm line. Bowline under the arms and a belayer on top. Maybe an anchor for the belayer, which could be as simple as a piece of rope run around a boulder.

MLW- dynamic or static rope? Static would offer firmer support perhaps (certainly better than the old goldline) but dynamic would be similar at the sort of conditions described...

Static is cheaper, and probably more appropriate. One can even do a "meat anchor" in this situation (tie a figure-8 into the anchor-person's harness, and have someone rap off of that anchor -no anchor-building necessary). Or, just wrap the dang rope around the anchor-person's hip, assuming they are in a sitting position and the rappeller has a lip to go over to ease the tension.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 03 2013, 6:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Static for what you propose. A slip should be caught immediately. No one should be taking such a fall that dynamic would be necessary.

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6 replies since Dec. 01 2013, 2:09 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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