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Topic: Looking for A Long Lost Backpacker Destination, From old farm to cabin to homestead< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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kage121 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 10:06 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ok, so this is going to be a longshot, but I thought I would give it a try. A few years ago, there was an article written in a backpacker magazine about this 3-5 day trip in the mid-west going from one abandoned farm to a cabin, to a homestead... to something else each day. Ive lost my magazines in a move and wanted to make this trip next summer. I dont even know the state it was in. The pictures were amazing and showed homes grown over with ivy and moss covered farms. The writer was super poetic telling the stories of people who had made these places their homes and what it was possibly like to live there. Anyway, this articles left quite the impression, so I am trying to find it or the route... can anyone help me?
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2012, 8:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Michigan? I kind of remember that article

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QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2012, 10:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was thinking maybe either Missouri or Arkansas, maybe even Southern Illinois or Inidana. I think you go by some buildings on the Buffalo River trail in the Arkansas Ozarks.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2012, 5:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Buffalo River Trail, Parker-Hickman Farmstead

http://www.ouachitamaps.com/Buffalo%2001%20West.html


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WisMike Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 26 2012, 10:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Buffalo River Trail is mentioned in the latest BP mag (November issue) on page 16.
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rayestrella Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 26 2012, 8:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't recall the article but I was just hiking on private land and ended up close to an old farmstead. While my dinner rehydrated I walked a 1/4 mile to the buildings. The barn has collapsed and I stayed far from it but I did walk into the house, just a bit as you never know how strong the structure is.

It made me very sad to be there and think that I know the 34-year old daughter (Rhonda) now and thought about her and her sisters being born there and growing up working the land and being flooded out every 7 years or so. (That was why they finally gave up.) It had to be a hard life.

Here is a picture of another even older place than theirs that I went out to. It is on property that Rhonda’s grandma bought from another family that quit long ago. I have often wondered why old farmsteads are allowed to just sit and fall apart instead of being bulldozed and turned into crop land. I think it is a respect thing.

You have given me an idea, kage121. Maybe I should buy a better camera and start hiking out to old farms and make a photo essay myself. Nothing like a depressing coffee table book… ;-)


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 29 2012, 3:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I walked past the Parker-Hickman homestead last weekend; I was truly impressed with the build quality of they original home. Never before had I seen double dovetail joinery, those logs wouldn't move if they wanted to.  

As mute testimony of how hard life as a homesteader can be there is a cemetary about a mile or so away from the homestead, most of its residence were young children of the Parker and Hickman families...As a father of young children the sacrifices these folks made to live there hits home pretty hard.
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