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Topic: Backpacking clothing, Help pick out appropriate clothing< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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HikerChick03 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 16 2013, 3:59 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So i want to do some late spring, summer, and early fall backpacking and was lost on what to buy for clothes. I know obviously maybe rain gear and convertible pants. But I'm lost as to what else. Like what kind of shirts and should i have some sort of jacket and or warmth layer. The backpacking will take place in Minnesota and will be mid may-mid september. Any help is greatly appreciated.
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WiscoHiker Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 16 2013, 10:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My preference is to bring a base layer consisting of long "underwear" and a long sleeve undershirt -- synthetic and very light-weight.  If the weather will be or could be cold, my base layer is heavier.  The base layer doubles as sleepwear, too.  

I take several pair of smartwool socks as well as a couple pair of short underwear.

Outerwear consists of convertible pants, long-sleeved button-down shirt, and short-sleeved t-shirts -- again, all synthetic.

I will bring a jacket, hoodie, or other heavier outerwear if the weather will dip into the 30s or lower.

Rain gear, of course, is essential on all backpacking trips.

I wear a ball cap and sunglasses, too.

My clothes are put in ziplock baggies (gallon, freezer type) with all the air sqeezed out.

This is how I decide what to take:  I decide on an "outfit" to hike in depending on the weather, and it usually consists of smartwool socks, short undewear, short sleeved t-shirt, long sleeved button down shirt, convertible pants, and my ball cap (of course, my hiking boots! LOL).  I figure it it's not raining and if I don't fall into a river or stream (!), this "outfit" should last the entire trip (my trips are usually only three or four days).  The rest of my clothes are spares for when I get wet or cold.  

I can't tell you how many times I come home with clothes that never get worn, but I'd rather have them than be sorry.

Finally, I take at least one spare set of clothes in case things get wet.
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QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 16 2013, 2:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Avoid clothes that are blue or black  as they tend to attract mosquitos and other biting insects. I reccommend you spray your clothes with  permethrin to keep  ticks away.
You can  wear merino  wool clothing which doesn't get as  stinky as synthetics do.
Look at various short  sleeve synthetic  shirts like Mountain Hardwear Wicked Light or Patagonia Cap1 silk weight  shirts.
For a insulation layer look at somehting like a Patagonia Down  Sweater  jacket. It's Lt. Wt and packs down  very small. Or look at a Lt Wt fleece shirt like a Mountain Hardwear Microchill or a Patagonia R1 top.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 17 2013, 11:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(WiscoHiker @ Mar. 16 2013, 9:05 am)
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My preference is to bring a base layer consisting of long "underwear" and a long sleeve undershirt -- synthetic and very light-weight. If the weather will be or could be cold, my base layer is heavier. The base layer doubles as sleepwear, too.

I take several pair of smartwool socks as well as a couple pair of short underwear.

Outerwear consists of convertible pants, long-sleeved button-down shirt, and short-sleeved t-shirts -- again, all synthetic.

I will bring a jacket, hoodie, or other heavier outerwear if the weather will dip into the 30s or lower.

Rain gear, of course, is essential on all backpacking trips.

I wear a ball cap and sunglasses, too.

My clothes are put in ziplock baggies (gallon, freezer type) with all the air sqeezed out.

This is how I decide what to take: I decide on an "outfit" to hike in depending on the weather, and it usually consists of smartwool socks, short undewear, short sleeved t-shirt, long sleeved button down shirt, convertible pants, and my ball cap (of course, my hiking boots! LOL). I figure it it's not raining and if I don't fall into a river or stream (!), this "outfit" should last the entire trip (my trips are usually only three or four days). The rest of my clothes are spares for when I get wet or cold.

I can't tell you how many times I come home with clothes that never get worn, but I'd rather have them than be sorry.

Finally, I take at least one spare set of clothes in case things get wet.

This seems like a good list. In MN, I'd have some lightweight long sleeve shirts for sure to help with mosquitoes. I've found the generic Target brand underarmor (I think it's C9 or something like that) works pretty well. Synthetic, can be fairly warm, yet cool, dries fast, light and quite durable.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 17 2013, 2:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If shopping for clothes look for deals at Sierratradingpost.com, steepandcheap.com or ebay.
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peeb Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 18 2013, 10:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here in WI I've taken to wearing long sleeve shirts and long pants year round.  Hiking pants should be mosquito proof but shirts are another matter - my wool or synthetic baselayers will stil get me bitten.  I like a light yet ventilated shirt, SPF rated, when I know the bugs will be out (mine happens to be from a company called Sun Precautions, but many gear shops carry nylon shirts, usually button down, for hiking).

I do treat my clothing with permethrin.  I haven't had a tick in years :)

Also, I tuck a headnet in my pack all season long.  Over a wide brimmed hat, it can save your sanity at times!  It doesn't take up space in my pack when I don't need it, but I'm always happy to have it when I do.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 18 2013, 4:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I do most of my backpacking in WI and the UP, permethrin and deet are my best friends!  I treat all my boots, socks, pants, shorts, hat and shirts with permethrin and spray copious amounts of deet on my hat and over my clothes -- bugs fear me! LOL
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Hungry Jack Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 11:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

All good advice. I try to do most of my Midwest backpacking when the cooler fall temps arrive and the bugs die down, or in early spring before they hatch.

I would only add that I would only bring two cotton items when packing:
1) a cotton t-shirt for sleeping--it soaks up your body oils that can damage your bag liner over the long term, and it is much comfortable than any synthetic fabric
2) a cotton bandanna for soaking up perspiration or as a head sun/bug protector.

Everything else should be a wicking/quick dry fabric.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 25 2013, 10:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

A picture says it all - cotton and cold wet conditions don't mix:




This was a hike lead by an experienced backpacker. I would have sent home the woman wearing the fashionable blue jeans and trail runners. the conditions were wet enough and slippery enough to require microspikes and gaiters.
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8 replies since Mar. 16 2013, 3:59 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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