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Topic: Cougar sighting in Northern WI< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Indianabob Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 16 2013, 9:05 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This came out awhile ago but my sister just sent the link. I have family in Spread Eagle. This sounds like it was fairly close.

http://www.wisconsinoutdoorfun.com/article....-County
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 17 2013, 6:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My Wife and I were up bping at Kickapoo Valley Reserve last weekend and talked with a Ranger up there who stated they have had reports of a cougar in the area.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 18 2013, 11:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My parents saw a black one in northern Wisconsin about 6 years ago.  And, yes, it was a cougar.  It was close enough for them to get a good look.  Didn't stay around long, though.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2013, 11:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The one IndianaBob is talking about is probably the same one that was seen down in Kickapoo Valley area. I imangine they have a fairly large range they wander.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2013, 12:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've mentioned this before in other threads, but many of the cougars found in the Upper Midwest are dispersing young males from the Black Hills area. Even the cougar found in New England a couple years ago was genetically identified as originating in the Black Hills.

So the cougars around here are traveling thousands of miles in search of territory and mates. But until those young males find mates, they might travel widely and not establish a home range. Once established, a home range averages about a distance of 11 miles squared or at most 17 miles squared. (See University of Michigan Animal Diversity Web.) So if two sightings are greater than those distances apart, that suggests either a roaming cat looking for territory or more than one cat.

I think it is more likely that the cougar sightings in Northern Wisconsin and in Northern Michigan are not of several cats but rather of one or a few males that are not having any luck finding females and thus are not establishing home ranges.

Unfortunately, young females are not as likely to disperse as young males, and then not as likely to travel as far. So I keep hoping you folks will be the happy hosts of a rare female disperser, but that may take some time.

I'm always happy to see reports of cougars farther east. Thanks for the link. May your cougars find mates and have many kittens. :D


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2013, 1:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't want any more cougars, as that is just another thing for my wife to worry about attacking us either on the trail or while we sleep in our tent.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2013, 6:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ah, maybe that is why so many hunters around here don't like cougars. It's an excuse to pretend they are braving the dangerous world of the outdoors, so they have to leave their wives at home and "go out with the guys."

And maybe that is why women backpackers come here to hike solo, so they don't have to put up with their boyfriends and husbands pretending the outdoors are just too dangerous for women.

I don't know. I'm just speculating about some folks. But I think the outdoors around here would be comparatively boring without mountain lions. A good trip is when I see at least tracks. An actual sighting is even better.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 19 2013, 6:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think you have a better chance of getting struck by lightening than getting attacked by a big cat or a bear. But you know how some people are.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 21 2013, 7:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was having a discussion with a friend the other day about the dangers of being in the wilderness now that there are wolves, cougars, bobcats (?), etc. rebounding in northern Wisconsin.  I know the chances of even seeing one is remote, but since some of us hike with our dogs, it has become a bit of a concern.   Most of us understand that wild animals will avoid human contact and our chances of being attacked is nearly zero, but I now have to be ultra-careful with my dog.  

As for me, I'm always happy to hear about these animals re-establishing themselves in the northwoods, but I think the DNR should be more upfront with us about them and stop ignoring the fact that there are wolves and cougars in Wisconsin.  I think we've seen the tide turn (re the DNR) but only because they've been forced to admit that these animals are here.

Enjoying the wilderness means (to me) being able to partake in the beauty of it while being aware of the potential dangers.  We don't dam up rivers so they are easier to ford farther downstream, do we?  So why should be limit an animal's population so it's safer to hike/backpack?  My position --> we shouldn't.

I'm not a farmer or rancher, so I can't speak to their concerns, however.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 22 2013, 2:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

We've had them around the Dells for years. There was one that was much too comfortable hanging around people that made the news several times. Rumor has, the DNR trapped and euthanized it. That they had traps out was well documented, then no one seemed to care about it anymore, so I was pretty sure that was the case. The next year we saw one, and reported it, because it seemed the thing to do. As we stood around the fawn it dropped, with several members of the Lake Delton PD it made a loud huffing noise from the woods. "I think you better get back in your car, ma'am." Well, I thought you guys would protect me. "We are protecting you, get back in your car!" And they did too. And that was the end of that.

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