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Topic: Hike (roughly) perimeter of Yellowstone and Teton?, Trail help needed< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 10:56 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm trying to plan a 4-5 week trip around the perimeter of Yellowstone np and Teton np. By "perimeter," I don't mean the precise lines of the park. I mean trails that come close to those lines that I can hike.

Can anyone recommend a website or book to help me plan this trip?

Tom
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You need to look at maps, rather than a book or website.  Figure out a route, which is going to include a lot of hiking outsides of the parks.  Are you wanting to only use trails, or offtrail?

So your trying to hike completely around both parks? How familiar are you with the yellowtone ecosystem?  Your going to have a lot of permit issues for camping inside the park, and GTNP is going to make you carry a bear cansiter for all your food when come through there.  Lots of food drop logistics.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Gary Ferguson did a hike in the early 90s that is almost exactly what you have in mind.  His book, "Walking Down the Wild: A Hike Through the Yellowstone Rockies" describes the hike.  Great book and Ferguson is one of my favorite outdoor writers.  Highly recommended and sounds perfect you.

Enjoy the book and the hike.  Should be a great one.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You need to look at maps, rather than a book or website.  Figure out a route, which is going to include a lot of hiking outsides of the parks.  Are you wanting to only use trails, or offtrail?

TO: I prefer to use trails.

So your trying to hike completely around both parks? How familiar are you with the yellowstone ecosystem?

TO: I'm not an expert, but I've done a little research.

Your going to have a lot of permit issues for camping inside the park, and GTNP is going to make you carry a bear cansiter for all your food when come through there.  Lots of food drop logistics.

TO: Yeah, the food drop logistics will be difficult. I hiked the entire Idaho Centennial trail last summer, and I've been told the food logistics for that trail are more difficult than just about any other.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Mar. 04 2013, 11:15 pm)
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Gary Ferguson did a hike in the early 90s that is almost exactly what you have in mind.  His book, "Walking Down the Wild: A Hike Through the Yellowstone Rockies" describes the hike.  Great book and Ferguson is one of my favorite outdoor writers.  Highly recommended and sounds perfect you.

Enjoy the book and the hike.  Should be a great one.

Thanks! I'll look for that book.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ThomasOord @ Mar. 04 2013, 11:23 pm)
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Thanks! I'll look for that book.

Amazon is your friend.  They have copies dirt cheap right now.

Of course you'll need maps and have to deal with permit and food drop issues, but I'd go for it.  Always follow your dreams.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 04 2013, 11:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I posted a trek we did from Yellowstone NP to Teton Pass last fall, about 60miles.  That may help with part.  
I have also done Yellowstone about 2/3 rds the way around on trails in the Park.  You can figure that out with the Trails Illustrated maps.  I know you can hike the Yellowstone ridge boundary from E entrance road to the Thorofare.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2013, 11:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Cool, wasnt sure if you were serious about this or not.  Super Cool Trip!

Your best bet is to look at the maps and pick a route, and to talk with people who are familiar with the backcounty here.  You've got lots of options, its a very doable trip

There are trails around both parks.   The eastern ridgeline that makes up the yellowstone boundary is hikable, its what i would do instead of using trails on this side, there is soft trails and boundary markers here, as well as being above treeline so easy to navigate  This is the most spectacular hike you can do in yellowstone.

Follow the thorofare out the se, and go to younts peak, then head towards the tetons.

I know there is a cut in the woods on the western boundary of yellowstone, im not sure if it goes all the way.

Ask any route questions you have, someone should be able to offer info for you


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2013, 12:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks to you all.

bbobb - what's the name of the thread on which you posted your hike?

Robinhood - Where do you start that eastern boundary hike?
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2013, 4:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This post is making me drool! :p   I've contemplated the Yellowstone portion of this plan many times but have never followed through (yet ??? ).

ThomasOord - I can't comment on the Grand Teton portion for your planning, but I do have some Yellowstone thoughts.

From the northwest corner of the Park, hiking in a clockwise fashion, it should be relatively easy to find a route all the way to the southwest corner at the Bechler Ranger Station.  It could be done on mostly existing trails, with some of RobinHood's suggested off trail portion among others.  

The big question is what to do along the western boundary of the Park?  There are some options here.  You could head up the Bechler River, which would take you back to the interior of the Park and then hodgepodge your way north.  Or, depending on how adventurous you are, you could hike some of the old park trails (not easy by any means).  This might require a couple special permits to camp in non-designated backcountry campsites while in the Park.  If you are interested, I can give you more specifics.

As for logistics, beside the food resupplies that I am sure you are already contemplating, you will have to renew or have a separate backcountry permit for Yellowstone for every two weeks you plan to stay in the backcountry.

Well, this sounds like a hell of a trip no matter what route you end up taking.  Have a great time planning and backpacking this one.  And by the way, I'm still drooling! :p


RobinHood - We need to contemplate the Yellowstone portion of this!
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 05 2013, 4:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here:

http://forums.backpacker.com/cgi-bin....ighline

search bbobb169 or teton highline if doesnt work.

Have garmin track if you want it....pm me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 10:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

On the West side of Yellowstone DO NOT miss Boundary Creek. Dunanda Falls is the most exotic place I've ever found in this time zone. The Western Section of the South Boundary Trail has MAJOR water crossings to consider.

Bbobb's trip is something I'd love to do if I could ever put the time together. the Northern Tetons are among the most underrated mountains you will ever find.

On the East of GTNP some things to consider: Arizona Lake/Bailey Creek can be Grizz infested. Personally, I'd skip much of the south boundary Trail of YNP. I hiked it 11 years ago. Some great stuff, but what I'd do is: After summitting Yount's Peak southbound I'd follow the Divide Crest from Marson Pass to Bonneville Pass near Brooks Lake. This is a magical section of the Continental Divide, it not being included with the CDT was a huge mistake IMO, but one I love since it means solitude. From there I'd follow the Breccia Divide towards Togwotee Pass. Then head into the Leidy Highlands for more more high Grizz probability. Don't miss the summit of Mt. Leidy, arguably the greatest view of the entire Teton Range. Cross the Gros Ventre, go to the Headwaters of Crystal Creek. That Divide is also among my favorite places on earth. Go down Swift Creek to Granite Creek. Hike the Granite Hi-Line Trail to either Cache Creek in Jackson or the Jackson Peak Trailhead. This trail requires route finding like the divide will.  If the latter don't miss the summits of Gros Ventre ["Gros"] Peak and Jackson Peak.

If you do this fill me in, might be able to help with some transpo/shuttle logistics.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 12:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The eastern boundary is definately off trail.  What I call easy could be considered difficult by others.  But if you possess route finding skills, then this is not hard to accomplish, although it could suck if you have a heavy pack. Its easy, there just isnt a maintained trail.  But there are boundary markers everywhere.

Basically its the same thing as the skyrim trail.  Up and Down, constantly. and most often its best to go to the top of each ridge, because going around can suck.
You have several options to get to this route.  You can get up here via republic pass, any of the trails heading up westward outside the park in the northern absorakas.  You can also go down lamar river, then up miller creek.  This is all fire burn, allthough its much easier.  there are some sections of unburned areas in miller creek that are specatcular.
Let me see if i can post some pictures of offtrail in this area,  not computer smart, so i will try not to post them to big


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(scatman @ Mar. 05 2013, 4:23 pm)
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RobinHood - We need to contemplate the Yellowstone portion of this!

Sent you an email.  Yes im drooling over this idea too.  Maybe2014??  Can you get 4 weeks off??

See you on corndog day.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 12:33 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Basically, what I would do:

Northern Yellowstone, all trailed across the top.  

Eastern side, I personally would stay high along the border, come down in Pahaska for a food drop, then head back up to eagle pass (offtrail), and then trail down the thorofare.

From here i suggest listening to DC, he seems to know this area very well.  I havent been out there, going this sept with scatman, but you might already do this by then.  Make your way to southern tetons, then head north.

After your done with the main crest trail, look at bbobbs route north.  I still have to research his route (had it saved since he posted last fall) to compare with my notes ive collected from Ranger John and other Teton rangers over the years.  Supposidly Glacier lake/mnt thru the moose basin area is fantastic, and offtraill.

I really have no clue on how to do the western route north to skyrim.  I just know scatman has shown me pics of the cut line on the yellowstone boundary that i think is an old unmaintained trail.  You could use national forrest trails here west of the park.  perhaps there is someone here who is familiar with west yellowstone who could give you advise on this.

I have an early season trip planned from old faithful down thru the complete crest trail in the tetons.  Are plan is to drop our bear canisters with food along the grassy lake road.  So this could be a drop location option for you as well


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 1:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The eastern boundary of yellowstone/Absorakas, off trail.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 1:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

OK, since im not good at this, ill post a few more pics in sep posts.  all of these are offtrail on eastern boundary of  yellowstone np.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 1:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You can see how your above treeline, and its just a matte of route finding.  Usually only one way to go.

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 1:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If i knew how to post all these pics in one post i would, but i havent figured it out.  Here is one more pic of the eastern boundary

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 1:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Last one

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 7:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RobinHood @ Mar. 09 2013, 12:33 am)
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I have an early season trip planned from old faithful down thru the complete crest trail in the tetons.  Are plan is to drop our bear canisters with food along the grassy lake road.

Wow, this sounds like a super interesting route.  Are you going down the Bechler River first?  How do you link up to the Teton Crest?  How many days are you taking?  Sounds awesome.

I put this concept right up there with Double Cabin's Bonneville Pass to Marston Pass to Thorofare dream route.

Heck you could even link the two up for an awesome month long route!

I really need to get out more.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 09 2013, 12:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Bechler to Grassy Lk can be a day.  We went from Mountain Ash to Beula Lk for a day.  Hike down the old road from the Reclamation Rd to the East end of Lake of the Woods.  Cross country South to intercept the 008 trail in Boone Crk / Tetons, pretty much follow the 008 trail to Littles Pk.  This trail is some good, some cross country.  There is a variation that can get you into the Park earlier by staying in Bitch Crk a mile or so past Camp Lk.  Pretty much in Park highway ..... oops trail till cutting off just past Marion Lk to head to Moose Lake Basin.  Its possible (we did) to completely camp outside of Teton Park and not have to pack bear cans, just hang food.  Another good alternate is to drop into Avalanche Cyn and come back out by Veiled Pk to Alaska Basin.  You can go from Teton Pass back up the Teton front mostly ontrail till Jackson Lk then pick up more trail to take you to the Reclamation Rd.  From there to the S Entrance and follow the S Boundary trail to the Thorofare.  Looks pretty simple putting together, logistics of food the biggest hurdle.  More than 9 nine days gets a lot of food weight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 11 2013, 11:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(pudgy_groundhog @ Mar. 09 2013, 7:31 am)
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(RobinHood @ Mar. 09 2013, 12:33 am)
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I have an early season trip planned from old faithful down thru the complete crest trail in the tetons.  Are plan is to drop our bear canisters with food along the grassy lake road.

How do you link up to the Teton Crest?  How many days are you taking?  .

BBobbs post above this just answered your question.  Pretty easy to connect.  I think the key here is  camping outside of the park to avoid the bear canister.  And to quote a park ranger whom i will not name, "no one is going to check your pack in the northern part of the park".  I would never do such a thing, but thats just a quote ive heard.  For my trip, we are taking 13 days.  But we are also doing quite a bit of filming/exploring/offtrail.  For the op, i believe it can be done a lot quicker


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 12 2013, 12:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Robin Hood - regarding your photos:  God, I love that kind of walking.  Great pics!

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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 12 2013, 12:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

We didn't go the Canister route....easy to plan and camp outside GTNP.  One variation of my route may put you one night in a very remote section of the Park.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 13 2013, 9:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks to you all! These are helpful suggestions.

One more quick question: what's the best topo map to buy to plan my hike? I'll be carrying a delorme gps, but I also like to carry a paper map. What should I buy, and where can I get it?

Tom
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 13 2013, 11:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You know, this looks like a really great endeavor.

I have both the 2005 USDA FS Teton Wilederness Map and Gors Ventre Wilderness map. They are in metric; very good IMO. The Jackson & Buffalo RDs map of the BTNF is pretty good and also covers a lot of ground.

I like my Trails Illustrated/NG maps of GTNP and YNP; 1 for GTNP and 4 for Stone.

Just a couple of things others will weight their opeinions on. I'm assuming you wouldn't begin the trek until the end of June at the earliest on the lower elevation North end. Otherwise, July 4 in an appropriate place if snow comes back around.

If you plan later in the ear to beat bugs remember Grizzlies will share much of your Alpine route later in August turning over rocks for AC Moths. Earlier in August they'll be looking for what's left of the Whitebarks, expect them to be where there are Whitebarks then.

I wouldn't Cowboy Camp any of it; take a tent and use it even on the clearest of nights.

If we get in a wetter pattern backcountry travel can be heavily impacted in the region. I'd have a Satelite phone if I were you.

If you don't take a canister be diligent on hanging EVERYTHING you are supposed to. You're going to be going through thick grizz country. Have a great time with peace of mind.

Beetle Kill is a variable I doubt any of us can do more than speculate on. I now about some int the Teton Wilderness. If you can pick unforested routes, of any elevation, I sure would unless you know otherwise. 30 years ago I saw trails in the Absaroka that a hiker will sure get a workout on. Maintanence is rarely if ever visible, sometimes the trail has faded to history. As deep in as you will be expect a few unmantined areas to require deafall hopping.

I'll try and post some pics from points further South.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 14 2013, 11:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


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This is on the Divide Crest North of Bonneville Pass on the border between the Shoshone and Bridger-Teton National Forests. Early July 2002





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Same area, looking NE into Teton Wilderness. July 2008


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Ascending from Bonneville Pass


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Blacks Peak fro Divide of Swift Creek and Crystal creek in Gros Ventre Mountains. July 2007.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 14 2013, 12:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the info and pics, Double Cabin!
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