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Topic: 2013 Summer backpacking, Need ideas for some trips.< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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Mtdonkykong Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2013, 8:16 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hay everyone
 I am going to be taking some of my friends backpacking this summer and this is there first time backpacking. It has been near 10 years since I was a tender foot and need some advise on what a good beginner trail would be. The requirements I have is; we have to be able to get a three night trip out of the trail, would prefure to have some privece in the sence that when we make camp we don't have to worry about too many other people walking by, prity easy hiking and fires allowed.

Thank you
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hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2013, 9:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Where are you coming from and what level of difficulty are you interested in?

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2013, 9:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The state you are considering would be helpful too.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 19 2013, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No brainer for Rockies...the Four Pass Loop by Aspen is one of the great, bucket-list, hikes of the world, because you are actually circumnavigating the famously-photographed Maroon Bells.

It's a challenge, (14,000 ft. of cumulative elevation gain,) but the views and wildflowers are fantastic.

When I last did it a couple of years ago, it took us 72 hours, TH to TH, and I was 70 years old. There's lots of camping places too, you just have to look for them.

And don't let the negative, misanthropic armchair-quarterbacks tell you that the trail is too crowded. 98 percent of the hikers you encounter at first are dayhikers, and they will all turn around at the top of the first pass and go back down to their cars.

The last time we did the loop, we met only six other hikers who were doing the whole Loop during the entire three days we were hiking, (in the middle of primetime August.)

Due to persistant global-warming drought conditions, you probably won't be able to build a legal campfire, but on the other hand, because of the sequester, budgets are down, and who the hell is going to bust you?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A three day trip with an easy trail and not many people around. Hmmm.....

Yes, a state or region would be a beginning point I think.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 5:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

hikes near the Colorado front range would be what I am looking for and the difficulty should be easy enough so that some who has never hiked could enjoy them selves.
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Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 10:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Mtdonkykong @ Apr. 19 2013, 6:16 pm)
QUOTE
Hay everyone
 I am going to be taking some of my friends backpacking this summer and this is their first time backpacking. It has been near 10 years since I was a tenderfoot and need some advice on what a good beginner trail would be. The requirements I have is; we have to be able to get a three night trip out of the trail, would prefer to have some privacy in the sense that when we make camp we don't have to worry about too many other people walking by, pretty easy hiking and fires allowed.

Thank you

Colorado front range has the most visitors, as well as the most fire restrictions, etc., so your request is a pretty tall order.   The fire restrictions are going to be particularly difficult, as there are almost certainly going to be fire restrictions this summer...perhaps state-wide.

My suggestions would be as follows.

1.  Go to the library and get a few Colorado hiking books.  "100 Classic Hikes in Colorado" would be a good place to start.

2.  Pick one that sounds interesting.

3.  Get a map of that area.  The National Geographic Trails Illustrated series is nice.  Find your hike on that map, then look and see if you can modify the one in the book....pick another option on the map, or take a different branch on the trail...make the trip your own.

4.  An hour or two on the road, getting farther from the front range will pay big dividends in privacy.

Sorry this isn't quite what you're looking for, but IMHO part of the fun is planning the trip.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 24 2013, 9:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Colorado Sangres are a little further, but outrageously scenic and with much smaller crowds than front range trails.

Of what age and physical condition are these novices? Are they hikers who just haven't made the jump to BPing, or true trail newbies? Do they live at high elevation?

How about an in-and-out hike with 2 nights spent at the same camp? That makes for a little more relaxing first trip. (You can dayhike from camp on the second day.)

In the Sangres, Macy Lakes, Sand Creek Lakes, North Crestone Lake and Willow Lake all fit that bill, with spectacular scenery and plenty of off-trail exploring in all cases. But none of these hikes are easy, depending on the answers to my questions in my second paragraph. You likely won't have any of these places to yourselves, but they won't be overrun with ppl either.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 24 2013, 10:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sand Dunes NP.  If you can't get the backcountry sites you are looking for you can always camp in the dune field.  You can easily squeeze three days out of the trail that wraps around the North edge of the dunes.  Its easy hiking.  No fires in the park though.
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Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 24 2013, 1:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cweston @ Apr. 24 2013, 7:48 am)
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The Colorado Sangres are a little further, but outrageously scenic and with much smaller crowds than front range trails.

I love the Sangres but left it out because of the elevation gain.

It's not something I'd recommend for people who've never been backpacking before.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 24 2013, 2:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Lamebeaver @ Apr. 24 2013, 12:48 pm)
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I love the Sangres but left it out because of the elevation gain.

It's not something I'd recommend for people who've never been backpacking before.

Definitely a concern.

A person with a 4WD vehicle could park at the upper 4WD trailhead, hike over Music Pass and into the upper Sand Creek drainage with fairly modest elevation gain. Parking at the 4WD trailhead saves you about 1,600 ft of gain.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 28 2013, 12:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
The Colorado Sangres...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QUOTE
Sand Dunes NP.


Dull and duller.

Park your car at the Eldora Ski Area 20 miles west of Boulder, and hike the isolated 4-mile trail up to the Arrestua Cabin on Guinn Mountain. Its only a dollar a night, with a super-hot, cookable wood stove and plenty of firewood, provided by the Colorado Mountain Club.

Use this as your base camp to explore the railroad tunnels, mines, big wildlife, and ghost towns atop the Continental Divide.

You won't even have to pack tents, all your hiking will be dayhikes, and the nightime panoramic view of the lights of Denver from the cabin's front porch, (11,000 ft.,) is just fantastic!

Pack plenty of our world-famous Colorado craft beer, or herb!
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 28 2013, 1:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HPD must be smoking something extra special these days.

There's a reason the last 14er summited in Colorado by aperson of European descent is in the Sangres.

I understand LB's elevation concern. I'd however stick C Weston's suggestion up against anything on the Front rRange and then some. With decent clearance once could also get way up Trinchera and then walk that incredible Crest. Wildlife in HPD's neck of the woods can't compare with that or Sand Creek either.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 28 2013, 9:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(highpeakdrifter @ Apr. 28 2013, 12:53 am)
QUOTE
QUOTE
The Colorado Sangres...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QUOTE
Sand Dunes NP.


Dull and duller.

Park your car at the Eldora Ski Area 20 miles west of Boulder, and hike the isolated 4-mile trail up to the Arrestua Cabin on Guinn Mountain. Its only a dollar a night, with a super-hot, cookable wood stove and plenty of firewood, provided by the Colorado Mountain Club.

Use this as your base camp to explore the railroad tunnels, mines, big wildlife, and ghost towns atop the Continental Divide.

You won't even have to pack tents, all your hiking will be dayhikes, and the nightime panoramic view of the lights of Denver from the cabin's front porch, (11,000 ft.,) is just fantastic!

Pack plenty of our world-famous Colorado craft beer, or herb!

Thanks. This sounds like a gem.

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If your cup is full, may it be again

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