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Topic: Fort Collins day hikes, car camping ideas< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
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PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 8:44 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Middle aged hiker in good health looking for day hike ideas in the Arapaho National Forest for July.  Up to about 10 miles rt and under 11,000 ft.  Staying at Stove Prairie and Mountain Park.  Thanks
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trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
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PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 8:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Head up Crown Point Road (up Poudre Canyon a ways).  Several nice hikes in the Comanche Peaks Wilderness and back towards RMNP
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PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 8:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have no idea where Stove Prairie or Mountain Park are:

http://www.localhikes.com/MSA/MSA_2670.asp


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PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 4:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Take a look at Grey Rock or Hewlet's Gulch, both are nice (just fown Poudre Canyon from Stove Prairie).  You could also head up to Pingree Park area, there are a bunch of good ones up that way as well.  Here is a link to a good site as well: http://www.poudrewildernessvolunteers.org/trails

Happy hiking@

JJ


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PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 10:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(jjack3230 @ May 06 2013, 2:31 pm)
QUOTE
Take a look at Grey Rock or Hewlet's Gulch, both are nice (just down Poudre Canyon from Stove Prairie).  You could also head up to Pingree Park area, there are a bunch of good ones up that way as well.  Here is a link to a good site as well: http://www.poudrewildernessvolunteers.org/trails

Happy hiking@

JJ

Most everything below the Pingree Park Rd was obliterated in the big fires of last summer.

Hewletts and Grey Rock were the first to go.

Then the High Park Fire took out everything S of Hwy 14 all the way up to the Pingree Park Rd, the only fire line the fire never breeched

Young's Gulch, a couple of miles up and across the road from Hewletts, (not far from Stove Prairie, that was almost erased from the map) is still closed, likely for most of this summer, due to the destruction.

The trails at Hewletts, Grey Rock, and the Kruetzer/Mt. McConnel Trails (Mountain Park) barely reopened by last Oct..

QUOTE
Fall Summary: High Park Fire Burn Area Treatment

Incident: High Park Fire Wildfire
Released: 10/24/2012

Fort Collins, Colo. (Oct. 24, 2012) - Aerial mulching in the High Park Fire burn area on National Forest System lands has been completed for this fall.

Burn Area Emergency Response (BAER) implementation on National Forest System lands within the High Park Fire burn area has been taking place throughout the late summer and fall. Work to date includes erosion control and hazard tree removal along trails and roads. Places treated with aerial mulching this fall included high priority areas of high and moderate soil burn severity on slopes between 20% and 60%. Mulching this fall took place on 881 acres with approximately 5,286 tons of wood shreds and was applied over 30 days.

Additional mulching on nearly 5,000 acres with straw is expected in to take place late spring or early summer. Mulching helps stabilize burned hills and reduce erosion in these areas. No treatment will take place in the Cache la Poudre Wilderness.

Other proposed work will continue as conditions allow, including noxious weed monitoring and treatment, additional erosion control and hazardous tree removal along roads and trails, trail stabilization, protection of archeological sites, and road stabilization.

Volunteers were crucial this summer and fall in getting the Hewlett Gulch, Greyrock and Kruetzer/Mt. McConnel Trails open to the public. The Forest Service appreciates all their hard work and dedication.

The closure order for the High Park Fire burn area is still in place, due to both rehabilitation efforts and general safety concerns. The closure area prohibits all activities on a portion of the Canyon Lakes Ranger District in two areas. The first area includes National Forest System (NFS) lands south of Highway 14 and east of the Cache la Poudre Wilderness. The second area includes a smaller portion of the original closure south of Highway 14 down to CR 44H to the east of Pingree Park Road just past the Monument Gulch Road. It is not all lands in this area, so please see the map for details. Portions of the Cache la Poudre Wilderness are now open.
SOURCE

You'll be staying near Ground Zero, one year after, the 2nd largest wildfire in recent CO history.

I took this photo ~ 20 mi east of Ft. Collins, so ~ 40 miles away from the fire.



Here's a map of the fires extent, it's pretty high resolution if you click on it to expand it all the way out.



So I'd start at Pingree and work my way up the Canyon. Don't bother with anything lower.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 11:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KenMH @ May 05 2013, 6:44 pm)
QUOTE
Up to about 10 miles rt and under 11,000 ft.  

Sorry, just noticed the altitude "restriction" to only 11,000'.

If that's the case, you're going to be SOL trying to find a hike in the Poudre Canyon.

Everything below that elevation got cinderized/ burnt to bare mineral soil last summer .

If you really want to drive a long ways from your camps, (though only a few miles as the raven flies), there's some great hikes up the Big Thompson Canyon and the lower reaches of RMNP


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PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 12:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Don't miss hiking to the source of the Colorado River!

Drive up Highway 14 and turn left on a 2wd gravel road all the way up to the south end of Long Draw Reservoir. Then hike an easy couple of miles over La Poudre Pass on the road that follows the Grand Ditch canal, which actually crosses the Continental Divide here.

Immediately after crossing the Continental Divide, you'll see a small lake on your left, filled with sawgrass laying in a spiral pattern. This is the source of the mighty Colorado River!

Continue hiking up the access road for the Grand Ditch, and you'll see fantastic views of the remote, isolated Never Summer Mountains and the entire birth canyon of the Colorado River all the way down to the Winter Park Ski area, forty miles away. And you'll see moose, elk and big-horn sheep in their natural habitat. (Don't try to pet the moose, because they almost certainly will kill you. They are much more dangerous than bear.)

This is a bucket-list world-class hike...and it's amazingly easy.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 1:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(highpeakdrifter @ May 07 2013, 10:11 pm)
QUOTE
Don't miss the source of the Colorado River!

Drive up a 2wd gravel road to the south end of Long Draw Reservoir,and hike an easy couple of miles over La Poudre Pass on the road that follows the Grand Ditch, which actually crosses the Continental Divide here.

Immediately after crossing the Continental Divide, you'll see a small lake on your left, filled with sawgrass laying in a spiral pattern. This is the source of the mighty Colorado River!

And all several 1000's of feet higher than the the OP's altitude limit.

( And if that qualifies as a "Bucket list" hike......................................................................................
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Roll another one   :D


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PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 1:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I can't imagine "source" would not be synonymous with "headwaters" when it comes to a river. Given that the Headwaters of the Colorado are in Wyoming could someone clarify this for me?

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PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 5:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
La Poudre Pass Lake (el. 3101 m./10,175 ft.) is a high lakelet located in the Rocky Mountains of northern Colorado in the United States.

The lake is located within Rocky Mountain National Park, generally in La Poudre Pass, just south of the Continental Divide. It often resembles a swamp more than a lake, depending upon the season. The lake is notable for being the recognized source of the Colorado River. It can be reached on foot via La Poudre Pass. (Wikipedia.)


The only thing I was smokin' was reality. Also note that the lake's altitude is 825 feet LOWER than the OP's limit of 11,000 feet.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 10:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That is the recognized source, by Congress, not geography. The Green has run considerably longer than the Colorado when they meet and in reality the "source" is in the Winds with the head of the Green.

Before 1921 that Stretch of the Colorado was the "Grand River." Guess the name was to close to the only one of the 4 great rivers of the American West that doesn't begin in Wyoming.

I'm just having fun HPD.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 1:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, DC, I don't know that Congress determined the source of the Colorado River, but if you stand on the cliff in Canyonlands and look down to the confluence of the Colorado and the Green rivers, you can quickly see that the Colorado is the "main" river in this confluence by a factor of 10, and that the Green is just a relatively small...albeit longer...tributary.

Sorry to sound like Cliffy Clavin here, but for hundreds of years, cartographers have considered the river with the most water volume to be the "main" river, even though it might be shorter.

Otherwise, the Missippi River would run all the way across Montana, with its source in Yellowstone.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 9:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(highpeakdrifter @ May 07 2013, 10:11 pm)
QUOTE
Drive up Highway 14 and turn left on a 2wd gravel road all the way up to the south end of Long Draw Reservoir.

Long Draw Road was closed last August by both RMNP and Arapaho NF officials to begin "Hazardous Tree Mitigation"operations. The area has been decimated by bark beetles the past 5 years with up to 90% of trees killed which help fuel the High Park Fire last summer.

Logging operations began in an attempt to remove 80,000+ standing dead trees from the sides of the road. The operations shut down early because of unusually heavy snow last fall and likely will not be able to resume for some time, due to this years above average snowpack.

Until all logging operations are finished, the road will remain closed indefinitely while logging is under way.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 10:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

One of my "Annual Rites of Spring" has been to ride my MTB across Old Flowers Road that runs between Stove Prairie and Pingree Park roads.

Early in the season, the only way you can access it is by MTB , before the gate is opened for the motorized jeep/ ATV crowd, and is a classic high route through the Foothills with scenic views.

Before the High Park fire :


.
.
.


After "The Fire", the entire area remains closed, burnt down to mineral soil. This is from the Arapaho NF website.




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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 12:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Before the conversation continues when in Hades are any of you guys coming up here to the top of the Pacific Northwest, Midwest, Southwest? Heeh. Heeh.

The volume of water in the Colorado is negligbly greater than that in the Green at their confluence, nothing close to a factor of 10. Having stood at the Confluence overlook myself more than once  I'd love to know what you were smoking then. Just kidding man. The only reason you don't "know" about the Congressional action is because you don't want to read it.Before 1921 the Colorado River began with it's confluence with the Green, at least according to the map.

This link shows your assertion about the definition of "source" and "headwaters" is hardly resolved today let alone any time in the past.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_source

Personally I have always subscribed that the headwaters of any river system is the farthest point of source from the system's Delta. I expect that's why folks initially asserted the begining of the Colorado was at the confluence with the Green, just like the Ohio River doesn't start until the confluence of other rivers. Thorofare Creek is larger than the Yellowstone at their confluence, etc. The reason the Mississippi doesn't start here is because of the same type  of politics that ultimately changed the name of the Grand River.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 9:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was badly affected by altitude last year, or rather by my failure to acclimate myself. This year I'm going to one of DC's favorite destinations, Willow Lake, and hang out there reading watching the clouds, sleeping, etc. for 3 days - then move on to the hiking.

Because at least for me, except for the desert, alpine is pretty much what's happening.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2013, 12:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, DC, like many uneducated people, you are confusing the word, "politics" with "consensus-of-opinion."

It's like when they make a dictionary...They consider thousands of uses of a particular word and how it is used in literature...That consensus becomes the authoritive definition of the word that they put into the Dictionary.

Same way with geography. Before 1921, the so-called "Colorado River" began in UTAH! (At the confluence of the Green and the Grand Rivers...)

But the "Colorado" name had  clearly indicated that the consensus of opinion at the time had considered the river to have originated in Colorado!. The US Congressional Resoultion of 1921 simply codified that consensus.

The issue is over and done. Of all the current internet references to the Colorado River, I have not found a single one that listed the Colorado River's source as Wyoming.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2013, 11:33 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm not letting this one go you old stoner. How much have you really checked? Did you happen to check the USGS? You think that's a decent source for this question? Heeh. Heeh.  

Guess I should share this directly from the USGS site:

"For example, the length may be considered to be the distance from the mouth to the most distant headwater source (irrespective of stream name) or from the mouth to the headwaters of the stream commonly identified as the source stream."

http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/riversofworld.html

I believe that's why many folks add "True" when asserting the Colorado begins with the Green in the Winds and the Columbia begins as the Snake in fox Park in the Teton Wilderness.

Sorry to hijack the thread OP, as you can see were just having fun.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 11 2013, 3:27 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, DC, you ignorant slut, your so-called "rule" that the  longest tributary is the source of any river, also contains the provision that no river can originate in a confluence or a lake.

Well, that would eliminate nearly all the great river systems on Earth. Beginning with the Missouri
river system, which, according to you, should not even exist.

Rules are made to be broken, and in some cases, rules are broken so often that they cease to have any effect at at all.

Consider the Amazon, Orinoco, Congo, Rhine, Volga, Yangtse, Yukon,and Kuskokwin.

The point is that Rivers follow courses that are generally accepted, and not according to your rules...

See Siddartha by Herman Hesse.

"A river is eternal, because it is at it's source and it's mouth, all in the same instant."

(Hey, don't argue with me, Hesse won the Nobel Prize for this.)

So, DC, let me help you to rise above your anti-intellectual, black-and-white, lower-middle-class upbringing up into the dazzling world of gray, where the only thing you can count on is "generally-accepted-opinion,"

You'll be much happier.






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PostIcon Posted on: May 11 2013, 3:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It ain't my "rule" as you would have seen if you read the info DIRECTLY from the USGS. As to intellect if the people that actually make the maps can't detour your deluded educashun then, well, you better get a good vintage from Paonia. How many stoners does it take to make a cogent argument? We know now that at least in this circumstance its more than one.

This was fun. If you want to ever see the actual begining of the Colorado River Basin come on up. Thanks for the fun man.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 12 2013, 12:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Too bad it's not called the "Colorado" River...

You're good, DC...

I've always admired your sometimes irritable, but always cool, been-there-on-that-trail, wisdom, along with your dependably proper grammar and syntax, which probably makes you sound smarter than you really are.

You probably had a really, really good English teacher sometime in school.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 12 2013, 9:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

DC/HPD, just get a motel room back at the TPA hotel already....

Since the OP has never responded back, though, it's all in good fun.

But back to actually trying to actually hike in the Poudre Canyon.

Aeriel mulching operations are about to start up again, to try and stave off flash flooding/ mudslides/ etc. over the massive burn scar.

Everything S of Hwy 14 up to the Pingree Pk Road is closed, as well as a small area to the N .

The Kruetzer/Mt. McConnel Trails out of Mountain Home are closed. Everything around Stove Prairie is burnt to mineral soil. Hewlett's and Grey Rock are open, but it's through a moonscape of burnt trees.

If the OP is even following this thread, I'd suggest moving your camp up to Sleeping Elephant. MUCH quieter, better hiking at say....Dadd's Gulch, Roaring Creek, and quick access to the CO State Forest and the American Lks/ Lake Agnes trails.

You could do the long dayhikes to Blue Lake, or the Twin Crater Lks in the Rawah's, though that would stretch your mileage a bit.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 14 2013, 11:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

We've politicized the evolution of language more than enough here scupper.

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(swimswithtrout @ May 09 2013, 8:11 am)
QUOTE
One of my "Annual Rites of Spring" has been to ride my MTB across Old Flowers Road that runs between Stove Prairie and Pingree Park roads.

Early in the season, the only way you can access it is by MTB , before the gate is opened for the motorized jeep/ ATV crowd, and is a classic high route through the Foothills with scenic views.

Before the High Park fire :


.
.
.


After "The Fire", the entire area remains closed, burnt down to mineral soil. This is from the Arapaho NF website.



That is disheartening. I haven't seen an after shot of OFR until this. :( I love that area.
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