SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

 

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Advice on Yellowstone backcountry hiking, hiking yellowstone< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
herrBiermann Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 12:30 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My wife and I are looking at backcountry hiking yellowstone in late July. Does anyone have any advice on what trails would be best to take so we can see the best of what YNP has to offer? We are probably looking to do a 4 day hike. We have never done any backcountry hiking so we would want an intermediate trail. We both mountain bike and run frequently but we are also from Missouri so the altitude will take a couple of days to get used to.

Are backcountry camp sites pretty full in late July? I saw that you could reserve some.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
double cabin Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16493
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 4:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I know Southern Yellowstone very might well be quite buggy. I'm guessing the same up North but I'll defer to folks that know that better. Shoshone Lake will likely be pretty buggy too.

Heart Lake, hike Sheridan on "off" day. Not sure how bugs will be there, but again likely buggy.

Bechler only if bugs are WAY down and it is the absolute end of July. My Avatar is a side trail off the Bechler, great place.

Check Grand Teton Thread as it now has some info on National Forest too.

With 3 nights if you have the flexibility to get a walkup permit in Grand Teton if you can deal with a rougher trail the unmantained one up Avalance Canyon to Lake Taminah is pretty darn awesome. From there you could camp two nights on Avalanche Divide or throw in a night at the Northfork or Holly Lake if you ccan handle a longer day and the Thunder Gawds grant you safe passage over Paintbrush Divide. Otherwise go down Cascade, not Paintbrush Canyon.

3 nights also good with shuttle to Teton Canyon; first night at Mirror Lake in AK Basin, Second night Avalanche Divide. 3rd night stay on Divide or do get Holly Lake if you can. Northfork is OK if you want better chance of getting over Paintbrush first thing in the morning.


--------------
We have nothing to fear but an industry of fear...and man skirts.

http://www.facebook.com/media/albums/?id=129511480442251
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
bbobb169 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 862
Joined: May 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 5:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Heart lake, Two Ocean, Thorofare area loop near the South Boundary.

Get geysers, lakes, streams, somewhat solitude, decent trails.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
double cabin Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16493
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 10:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You must run the trails Bbobb. No way I'd think much of the SE corner at all with just 3 nights out.

--------------
We have nothing to fear but an industry of fear...and man skirts.

http://www.facebook.com/media/albums/?id=129511480442251
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
burntfoot Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2561
Joined: Mar. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 10:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

DC, Bbobb has the right idea, though.  Just too big of a chunk.  Before I got to his reply I was going to recommend Heart Lake for Days 1 and 2.  On that 2nd day, Mt. Sheridan can be climbed, an fishing on the lake can be done.  For day 3, head south to the South Boundary Trail either heading straight south from Heart Lake, or by going clockwise around the lake to the Heart River Trail.  There are good campsites on the South Boundary Trail, with some hot springs near the one 5 miles from the road.  Heart River would give a longer day 4.  Day 4, hike to the road.  If the river at the south entrance is too deep to ford, hike south a mile or so to the bridge.

--------------
I love the mountains!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
bbobb169 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 862
Joined: May 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 1:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Com'on guys at 60 I can do this........  

just kidding.  I didn't mean hike the whole place...... Look and plan a loop in that area.

I'd have to dig out my map and look, but I'll bet there is a nice 3 nighter.  Trails are decent.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
Montanalonewolf Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6819
Joined: Mar. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 3:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
We have never done any backcountry hiking so we would want an intermediate trail.

Sorry but I'd recommend against heading into YNP backcountry as a first time trip, UNLESS you're going with at least one experienced backpacker, especially one with grizzly experience.


--------------
If you are free to be a Liberal- Thank a person with a gun.

Those who don't read have no advantage over those who can't.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
SmokingHead Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3057
Joined: Feb. 2003
PostIcon Posted on: May 27 2013, 9:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Montanalonewolf @ May 25 2013, 3:40 pm)
QUOTE
QUOTE
We have never done any backcountry hiking so we would want an intermediate trail.

Sorry but I'd recommend against heading into YNP backcountry as a first time trip, UNLESS you're going with at least one experienced backpacker, especially one with grizzly experience.

+1

YNP trails are busy at that time of year but most sites are first come-first served and one night only. The northern half will be dryer (less bugs) with lots of views. You didnt mention how long you will be there and it does take awhile to get used to 7-8000 ft altitudes. Try "Yellowstone Trails - a hiking guide" by Mark Marshall (paperback $14) for info on trails. It has maps, mileages and is sorted by difficulty. I've been using it for 25 yrs.


--------------
It's pretty clear now that what looked like it might have been some kind of counterculture is, in reality, just the plain old chaos of undifferentiated weirdness.   Jerry Garcia
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
double cabin Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16493
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 28 2013, 10:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SmokingHead @ May 27 2013, 9:55 am)
QUOTE

(Montanalonewolf @ May 25 2013, 3:40 pm)
QUOTE
QUOTE
We have never done any backcountry hiking so we would want an intermediate trail.

Sorry but I'd recommend against heading into YNP backcountry as a first time trip, UNLESS you're going with at least one experienced backpacker, especially one with grizzly experience.

+1

YNP trails are busy at that time of year but most sites are first come-first served and one night only. The northern half will be dryer (less bugs) with lots of views. You didnt mention how long you will be there and it does take awhile to get used to 7-8000 ft altitudes. Try "Yellowstone Trails - a hiking guide" by Mark Marshall (paperback $14) for info on trails. It has maps, mileages and is sorted by difficulty. I've been using it for 25 yrs.

I am very cautious of grizzlies but believe even a newbie can do some Yellowstone trails but agree its probably better to consider others. I definitely think the SE corner of the park should be considered heavy grizz habitat, and packing on huge miles at a quick pace is not a good thing for anyone in there IMO. Do not believe any literature or statments that there are no grizz in the Bechler, they've been spotted there much of the last decade.

The Tetons still have a chance of seeing grizzlies but blackies are more common.

Like I said, check out the Grand Teton thread.


--------------
We have nothing to fear but an industry of fear...and man skirts.

http://www.facebook.com/media/albums/?id=129511480442251
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
herrBiermann Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: May 2013
PostIcon Posted on: May 28 2013, 10:19 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Montanalonewolf @ May 25 2013, 3:40 pm)
QUOTE
QUOTE
We have never done any backcountry hiking so we would want an intermediate trail.

Sorry but I'd recommend against heading into YNP backcountry as a first time trip, UNLESS you're going with at least one experienced backpacker, especially one with grizzly experience.

Unbeknownst to me my wife has done some backcountry hiking but I have not. She has been to the boundary waters in Canada/Minnesota a few times with her family and portaged. I know that's not the same as YNP but she does have some experience.

We may just look into staying at a car campsite and doing some day hikes. We were looking for a better way to explore the park than doing the traditional drive up to the tourist attractions. I'm hoping to spend 7-8 days there and I would like at least 4 of those days to be spent hiking.

Thanks for all of your suggestions.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
double cabin Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 16493
Joined: Nov. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 28 2013, 10:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

DAYHIKES! I am an avid dayhiker, could bend your ear for hours on Greater Yellowstone.

In Yellowstone if not too boggy/buggy I'd do Slough Creek and McBride Lake if Creek isn't too deep and wide. I stopped just short of the Summit of Washburn on Sunday, still some pretty deep snow. Avalance Peak is my favorite dayhike in Yellowstone, steep but short on one of the greatest views you'll ever have.. If you are all very fit Electric or Mt. Holmes might be in order.

I'm going to post a few photos here to try and get you into GTNP and the rest of Greater Yellowstone.

Here I am rsing up my favorite dayhike in the World, just 1.5 hours from Yellowstone South Entrance. Trailhead area vehicle camping spots are exquisite:



Same hike:


windows screenshot tool


Here's the view Southwest to the Tetons from Avalance Peak in YNP:


image hosting

The glorious Gros Ventre Range on a great dayhike from great vehicle camping.


image hosting without registration

A less than 2 mile dayhike into the Range arguably revered by more backpackers than any other:


image upload no size limit

I can fill you in on AWESOME vehicle camping with great dayhikes all over the Southern GYE. In GTNP most everything will be ready for you. Message me and set up a phone call when you have the Buffalo and JAckson Ranger Districts Map of the BTNF, best regional map for the Southern GYE.


--------------
We have nothing to fear but an industry of fear...and man skirts.

http://www.facebook.com/media/albums/?id=129511480442251
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
bbobb169 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 862
Joined: May 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 28 2013, 11:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Still need to get in there DC.......maybe when I can't get to those long mileage days anymore
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
scatman Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 117
Joined: May 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 12:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

herrBiermann - Let's try an unconventional route that might meet your requirements.  For day one, start at the DeLacy Creek Trailhead and follow the DeLacy Creek Trail to Shoshone Lake.  Turn west on the North Shore Shoshone Lake Trail and hike until you reach campsite 8S3.  The total mileage from trailhead to campsite is approximately 4.1 miles.  After hanging your food and setting up your camp, begin a day hike to Pocket Lake.  You will continue along the North Shore Shoshone Lake Trail until you reach the stream (drainage) that flows out of Pocket Lake (about .9 miles from camp).  On the north side of this drainage is a trail that leads to Pocket Lake.  The tail does not show up on most maps but it is there and easy to find and follow.  Pocket Lake is a gorgeous backcountry lake and you will have it all to yourself.  Take the time to hike around the lake and eat a snack before your return trip to camp.

Day 2 - head west along the North Shore Shoshone Lake Trail until you reach campsite 8R5 - approximately 7.2 miles.  Once there, set up camp again and then spend the rest of your day exploring the Shoshone Geyser Basin.

Day 3 - retrace your footsteps from the day before on your trip to the geyser basin until you reach the Shoshone Lake Trail where you will head north until you reach campsite OA2 or OA1 along the Firehole River - approximately 5.5 to 6.0 miles depending on the campsite you choose.

Day 4 - Continue along the Shoshone Lake Trail for a very short distance until you reach the intersection with the Howard Eaton Trail.  At this intersection, take a right and head to Lone Star Geyser.  I believe Lone Star erupts every three hours or so, so if you time things correctly you can see the eruption.  Once your done at Lone Star continue hiking to the northeast until you reach the junction with the Spring Creek Trail. Take the Spring Creek Trail all the way to its intersection with the Divide Trail.  At this point you have a couple of choices to make. First, you could hike out along the Divide Trail to the trailhead and head back to your vehicle along the road (2 miles).  Or, and I highly recommend this second choice, continue straight through the junction on the unmaintained portion of the Howard Eaton Trail.  This trail is pretty easy to follow and is marked with old trail markers.  It will take you up and over Norris Pass before descending down into DeLacy Meadow and will intersect with the trail you hiked in on, the DeLacy Creek Trail.  There will be some downfall that you will have to negotiate along this stretch, but nothing hard enough to keep you from doing it.  There is a lovely little meadow as you cross Norris Pass and the trail is easily followed on the way down the hill to the meadow.  Once you arrive on the west side of the meadow you will have a choice to make again.  The old trail disappears when you reach the DeLacy Creek Meadow.  Stop and take a break when you leave the trees and enjoy the view of the large meadow.  After resting you can either cut straight across the meadow to the east side and pick up the DeLacy Creek Trail and head north back to your vehicle, or I can supply you with the GPS points of the old trail and you can pick it up again after crossing a portion of the meadow and then follow it to the northeast until you reach the unsigned junction with the DeLacy Creek Trail and turn north and back to your vehicle.  This last leg of your loop would be roughly 7.5 miles.

Reasons to attempt this hike:
1. You get to see and hike through a beautiful meadow twice (DeLacy Creek Meadow)
2. You get to see a large backcountry lake (Shoshone Lake)
3. You get to see a small (gorgeous) backcounty lake (Pocket Lake)
4. You get to explore the Shoshone Geyser Basin (worth the price of admission alone)
5. You get to see one of the more famous Yellowstone Geysers in Lone Star Geyser
6. You get to travel the way they used to get through the Park 130 years ago along a portion of the unmaintained Howard Eaton Trail.
7. Total mileage of approximately 24 miles with nothing difficult.

What you will need - National Geographic's Trails Illustrated Map of Old Faithful so you can see the route I'm suggesting.

Let me know if you are interested in this route and I can give you more precise details.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
Eagle48 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 348
Joined: Feb. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 29 2013, 1:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just as a precaution on scatman's route, if you haven't hiked in a geyser basin before, and are unsure of where it is safe to walk and where you should avoid, then I would advise against the geyser basin.  You can seriously burn yourself if you don't know what you're doing, and when I saw seriously burn, I mean you'll die more than likely.

Aside from that cautionary bit, I think his route is a great suggestion as are several others on here already.  Yellowstone is a wonderful place, just be aware that it's also potentially deadly if you aren't properly prepaired, as the book "Death in Yellowstone" shows clearly.


--------------
I live to be outdoors.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
RobinHood Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 285
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 1:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Eagle48 @ May 29 2013, 1:05 pm)
QUOTE
Just as a precaution on scatman's route, if you haven't hiked in a geyser basin before, and are unsure of where it is safe to walk and where you should avoid, then I would advise against the geyser basin.  You can seriously burn yourself if you don't know what you're doing, and when I saw seriously burn, I mean you'll die more than likely.

Aside from that cautionary bit, I think his route is a great suggestion as are several others on here already.  Yellowstone is a wonderful place, just be aware that it's also potentially deadly if you aren't properly prepaired, as the book "Death in Yellowstone" shows clearly.

Just use common sense, and its pretty easy to navigate.  That basin gets fairly heavy use anyways, and footpaths are easy to spot.  But your right, being foolish there will kill you.

That's a great book you mentioned.  "Death in Yellowstone" is a must read for anyone fascinated by the park


--------------
The vast majority of every species that has ever lived on Earth is now extinct. To think that humans can avoid the fate of every other creature is arrogant. Like all life on Earth, our time is limited.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
Eagle48 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 348
Joined: Feb. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 10:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RobinHood @ May 30 2013, 1:09 am)
QUOTE

(Eagle48 @ May 29 2013, 1:05 pm)
QUOTE
Just as a precaution on scatman's route, if you haven't hiked in a geyser basin before, and are unsure of where it is safe to walk and where you should avoid, then I would advise against the geyser basin.  You can seriously burn yourself if you don't know what you're doing, and when I saw seriously burn, I mean you'll die more than likely.

Aside from that cautionary bit, I think his route is a great suggestion as are several others on here already.  Yellowstone is a wonderful place, just be aware that it's also potentially deadly if you aren't properly prepaired, as the book "Death in Yellowstone" shows clearly.

Just use common sense, and its pretty easy to navigate.  That basin gets fairly heavy use anyways, and footpaths are easy to spot.  But your right, being foolish there will kill you.

That's a great book you mentioned.  "Death in Yellowstone" is a must read for anyone fascinated by the park

Yes, the footpaths are there, but you never know when things may have changed from one year to the next.  It's a lively ecosystem, constantly changing.  I just feel that it can't be stressed enough to someone who has zero experience in that environment that you can simply bust right through the "crust" into a boiling underground cavern of water.

--------------
I live to be outdoors.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
bbobb169 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 862
Joined: May 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 1:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Walk where the bison walk...................
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
Eagle48 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 348
Joined: Feb. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 3:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(bbobb169 @ May 30 2013, 1:21 pm)
QUOTE
Walk where the bison walk...................

Great idea, then maybe you'll end up like the multiple bison skeletons in the area that can be seen in the hotpools, or at least could be seen back in June of 2007 in that very Geyser Basin.

Just sayin, I think a lot of y'all are making lite of something that is very serious.  Commen sense isn't so commen these days.


--------------
I live to be outdoors.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10635
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 3:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Eagle48 @ May 29 2013, 1:05 pm)
QUOTE
 Yellowstone is a wonderful place, just be aware that it's also potentially deadly if you aren't properly prepaired

Seems like one could say that about life in general.  "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst" and you'll be find.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
scatman Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 117
Joined: May 2007
PostIcon Posted on: May 30 2013, 5:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

herrBiermann - Do not let the cautionary posts from above dissuade you from seeing the geyser basin if that is what you choose to do.  The Park Service maintains a trail through the basin that is easy to recognize and follow.  If you stay on the trail you won't have any problems.  All the other recommended hikes in this post are great too and you can't go wrong with any of them.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
RobinHood Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 285
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 31 2013, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(herrBiermann @ May 24 2013, 12:30 pm)
QUOTE

Are backcountry camp sites pretty full in late July? I saw that you could reserve some.

All the backcountry sites from the NW corner to the NE corner will be busy, along with sites down the Lamar, Shoshone Lake, and Heart Lake.  After that its relatively easy to find an open backcountry site in the park.  Just realize its a big park, and easily can take you 3 hours to get to a trailhead, depending on where you are


--------------
The vast majority of every species that has ever lived on Earth is now extinct. To think that humans can avoid the fate of every other creature is arrogant. Like all life on Earth, our time is limited.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
RobinHood Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 285
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2013, 12:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

[quote=herrBiermann,May 28 2013, 10:19 am][quote=Montanalonewolf,May 25 2013, 3:40 pm]
QUOTE

We may just look into staying at a car campsite and doing some day hikes. We were looking for a better way to explore the park than doing the traditional drive up to the tourist attractions. I'm hoping to spend 7-8 days there and I would like at least 4 of those days to be spent hiking.

Thanks for all of your suggestions.

As for day hiking, Grand Teton is definitely the ideal choice for scenic views and beautiful alpine settings.

But if your set on exploring Yellowstone, and want to see some of the backcountry, here are some of my suggestions.

Spend a day in the tower/lamar area, and either hike into the hellroaring creek/black canyon trail system, or hike up slough creek as far as you feel like going.  I also like the pebble creek hike, but several people I know don't, so maybe that's just me.

Hike into the Pelican Valley.  There are restrictions here, you cant hike before 9am and have to be out before dark (maybe earlier).  Beautiful meadows/forest hike with lots of wildlife.  Bring binoculars, and you should always carry a pair while in Yellowstone.

Avalanche peak, near the East entrance to Yellowstone is possibly the best day hike in the park.  I highly recommend doing this.  Although its a short hike, Its a lot of "up", and will take some time to get to the top.  Spectacular views from the top.

From just south of canyon, you can hike the trail system out to ribbon lake and make a loop.  Although Ribbon Lake itself really isn't a spectacular view, the trip itself has a lot to offer.  Rolling meadows of Hayden Valley, thermal areas, and a great private view of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone.  This a relatively easy hike.  If its not closed for wolves, you can add in the hike out to wrangler lake.  Kind of a wooded/meadow hike to what I call a classic Yellowstone lake that you find in the caldera section.  In reality, it really compares to a lake you would find in Florida, except for the wolves and bears.

On your Old Faithful day, hike down delacey creek to Shoshone lake.  For a longer hike, go down the lone geyser trail, all the way to the Shoshone geyser basin if you want, as Scatman suggested above.  Also, meander around the different geyser basins near old faithful.  Really neat stuff, even though its not that far into the backcountry.  

If you can get to the NW section of the park, hike anything up there.  For a long day hike with some elevation gain, hike up to bighorn peak, which is along the sky rim trail.  The trailhead is north of West Yellowstone.  Another A+ hike I would put up there with Avalanche Peak.

Any part of the Mary Mountain Trail is vintage Caldera Yellowstone.  Just be cautious here.  Very heavy bear area.  People hike it all the time with no problem, every year.  Just be heads up

What I don't recommend:  Heart lake or anything in the se corner.  Not for day hiking.  Lamar River Trail.  Anything between Cascade Lake thru Ice Lake.  The Bechler area will take up too much of your time to get to, and is way to bugy in July.  Its not that there is anything wrong with these, I just think there are much better choices


--------------
The vast majority of every species that has ever lived on Earth is now extinct. To think that humans can avoid the fate of every other creature is arrogant. Like all life on Earth, our time is limited.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
RobinHood Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 285
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2013, 12:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(herrBiermann @ May 28 2013, 10:19 am)
QUOTE
[quote=Montanalonewolf,May 25 2013, 3:40 pm
Unbeknownst to me my wife has done some backcountry hiking but I have not. She has been to the boundary waters in Canada/Minnesota a few times with her family and portaged. I know that's not the same as YNP but she does have some experience.

We may just look into staying at a car campsite and doing some day hikes. We were looking for a better way to explore the park than doing the traditional drive up to the tourist attractions. I'm hoping to spend 7-8 days there and I would like at least 4 of those days to be spent hiking.

Thanks for all of your suggestions.

Another option for you is to do a few "one nighter" backpacking trips.  I would recommend this to anyone for their first trip to Yellowstone.  There are enough short options that its easy to hike out, drive to the next trailhead, and hike in again.

I do this quite often early season, before most of the park is assessable.  You get a chance to regroup each day, and not have to carry that much on each of your hikes.  Your options are endless here, as there are so many choices you could do.  This also allows you to see more sections of the park, instead of spending 4 days in one specific area on a trip.


--------------
The vast majority of every species that has ever lived on Earth is now extinct. To think that humans can avoid the fate of every other creature is arrogant. Like all life on Earth, our time is limited.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
apachemd Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 36
Joined: Feb. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 26 2013, 3:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(RobinHood @ Jun. 01 2013, 12:54 am)
QUOTE
Another option for you is to do a few "one nighter" backpacking trips.

This is a great idea.  We have a 4 day/3 night trip planned from 7/1-7/4 on the TCT, but it looks like there is going to be too much snow for us to be able to do it.  We're looking for alternate itineraries of the same length and the same dates, in either Grand Teton or Yellowstone.

Your multiple "one nighter" suggestion is intriguing b/c as I understand Yellowstone is huge and different areas are very different, this would allow us to backpacking in many different environments.  Any suggested specific itineraries?  For multiple one-nighters or for an extended 4day/3night trip in Yellowstone?  The more remote the better.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
Eagle48 Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 348
Joined: Feb. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 27 2013, 9:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lot's of options for you.  

A long overnighter is the Bliss Pass trail going from Pebble Creek over to Slough Creek.  Great fishing in Slough Creek, though the water levels may be too high/muddy to allow for good fishing at that time.  Wildlife in Slough Creek is second to none though.  This trip will also require a shuttle or hitchhiking.

Shoshone lake and they geyser basin can all be seen/explored as an overnighter starting at the Lone Star Geyser trailhead.  Hike in to the last meadow campsite before Shoshone and then explore the lake that afternoon and the geyser basin the next day.

Electric Peak is an amazing view and with it being just at 11,000 might be doable by the time you arrive.  You can hike in, set up a basecamp, and then summit the next morning before 11-12 so you avoid the static electricity buildup that gave the peak it's name.

I won't suggest the Bechler Region for that time frame due to the swamp like condiitons in regards to both water and mosquitos that are likely.

If you're willing to go outside of the park, head up to the Island Lake trailhead on HWY 212 in the Beartooth Wilderness and hike to Bechler or Albino Lake, better scenery than Yellowstone, and it'll rival the Tetons, snow conditions could be an issue though.  You could also do Lady of the Lake trailhead up to the Aero's as an overnighter.  Could also do the Clarks River Trailhead up to Ouzel Lake, though I think the other two options would be better.  All of this is a short drive from Cooke City which is the Northeast corner of the park.

Lots of options available for you.  If you want to stick to the Tetons and Yellowstone, a hike up as high as you can go in Paintbrush and Cascade Canyon could also be worthwhile overnighters.  Beautiful canyons.


--------------
I live to be outdoors.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
apachemd Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 36
Joined: Feb. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 27 2013, 2:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sweet.  Thanks Eagle48.  Your overnighter suggestions, along with Robin Hood's dayhike suggestions will definitely take care of YNP for us.

I conferred with my buddies and we decided to at least go up the tram and try our originally scheduled TCT itinerary.  We figured we can always either turnaround or take an alternate trail downhill if things get to hairy.

Our own concern is route finding, none of us have ever done that before.  We'll of course have a good topo map and a compass.  Any other suggestions in that regard?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
RobinHood Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 285
Joined: May 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 29 2013, 8:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you decide to go into Yellowstone, I would say 2 trips.

First, what Eagle48 suggested first is a classic Yellowstone hike.  The trip from pebble creek over bliss pass and out slough creek really is a great taste of Yellowstone.

I also think the sky rim section of North West Yellowstone is close to the best in the park, and you can do an easy loop from up there.  You also have the option to camp at high elevation outside of the park boundary, which there are many options for.  Talk to the backcountry office about this if you decide to go this route.  And really, if you do go this way, The West Yellowstone Backcountry office is where you should pull your permit, because the backcountry office is ran usually by the actual backcountry rangers who patrol this area.  They will set you up with an awesome trip


--------------
The vast majority of every species that has ever lived on Earth is now extinct. To think that humans can avoid the fate of every other creature is arrogant. Like all life on Earth, our time is limited.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
26 replies since May 24 2013, 12:30 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


 
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Advice on Yellowstone backcountry hiking
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions