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Topic: 10-14 days in Yellowstone, Hiking backcountry< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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Davidsc4 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 7:02 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello guys and girls

I am from Denmark, I have hiked, several places in Europe and also been so lucky, to have hiked in Zion and Arches in Utah.

Now me and my friend have decided to go to Yellowstone in April. We have planned to backcountry hike around 10-14 days.

I am having some troubles, finding examples of point to point hikes. My idea was to hike, from A to B to C, and hit a new campsite each night, if possible.

Do you guys know any sites, where I can find inspiration for long backcountry hikes in Yellowstone? And point to point, would be much appreciated.

Thanks a lot

David, Denmark
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Montanalonewolf Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 7:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"Backcountry backpacking in Yellowstone" produced over 180,000 results. Many aren't what you want but a little data mining gave:

http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/backcountryhiking.htm

http://trailguidesyellowstone.com/informa....ing.php

http://trailguidesyellowstone.com/

Oh, and if you've never backpacked in grizzly country, you'll want to read up on that and talk to people who have.
Stephen Herrero's "Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance" is a good start.


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Davidsc4 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 8:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the quick response.

I have already checked all the mentioned sites. But they "just" show various campsites and trails, which is also very helpfull ofcause.

But it would be great to se examples of others who had done like a 10 days backcountry hiking trip :)

About backpacking in bear country, I couldnt agree more, and that is something we are already reading a lot about.

Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 8:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello David,

Many years ago I lived in Helsingor for half a year, and have good memories of that time and the Danish people.

Yellowstone in April? Lingering snow would probably be a significant issue then.

There are many knowledgable people on the Forum here and I'm sure more ideas will come in the next few days.

Is your priority to do a trip in April? Or, alternatively, is your priority a backcountry hike in Yellowstone and you could change the dates to later, perhaps in the summer?

Eric
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 9:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello Eric

Great to hear, Helsingør, is a fine place.. I live in Aarhus, the second "largest" city in Denmark, which is located on Jutland.

April was the plan, but maybe there is too much snow?
I will look in to this thanks.

Sounds great, looking forward to some great feedback.

Thanks
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Lamebeaver Search for posts by this member.
trail? I don't need no stinkin trail!
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 9:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

April is very early for Yellowstone.  If you can't change the dates, I'd suggest changing your destination to Utah.

You can expect deep snow and winter conditions.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 11:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Like the others have said, April can, and probably will be, still winter in Yellowstone.  Be prepared for lots of snow and some pretty cold temperatures.  Below freezing would not be unusual.  If you plan on being at any elevation at all, you'd better bring snowshoes or skies.  The lower elevations should be alright but you're going to be very limited in doing any long distance hiking.  BTW, I live in the area and if you need any help when you're here, drop me a line before you arrive. I'd be glad to help out in any way - housing, transportation, etc.  Send me a P.M. if you wish.

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Davidsc4 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 4:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks a lot for your replies and help.

I will see if it is possible to move it to late June.

Hikerjer, I might just do that, when we get closer, thanks a lot :)
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 10 2013, 8:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Davidsc4 @ Dec. 10 2013, 4:25 pm)
QUOTE
Hikerjer, I might just do that, when we get closer, thanks a lot :)

Just let me  know. If I'm around, I'll be glad to help.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2013, 3:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You know Jer just got out of the Territorial Prison in Rawlins where he was sent up for stealing matchbooks from Scandanavian Travellers, right?

Late June is still a bit early for the high country here but you *might* luck out. I would not come any earlier than the 4th of July personally. In 1975 just above the town of Jackson in the Gros Ventre Mountains I found the second week of July to have over 3' of snow EVERYWHERE and 4' of ice on Goodwin Lake. Then again Goodwin Lake has been iced off in early June some years, just depends. I have snowshoes and more to lend if you're game.

My first and most basic advice is to think beyond park boundaries and to also think about two shorter backpacks instead of one big one. The Thorofare is a magical place, but IMO not appropriate for a first trip in the area. Here's what I've got as a first reccomendation:

Arrive after July 4th. Dayhike the Tetons a day or two for acclimation, maybe Bearpaw and Trappers Lakes the first day and then Ampitheatre Lake or Lake of the Crags the second day if you can handle the elevation changes.

You can generally do the Crest without Ice Axes after July 10  but if you can delay to latest July and Early August do a version of the Teton Crest Trail for 4 nights starting day 3. After that take a "rest" day and depending on bugs and water flows consider a 3 or 4 nighter to one of the following:

The Bechler: Usually best after August 1 and sometimes considerably later than that. I like Backcountry hotsprings I can soak in, world class waterfalls, and much more this hike can offer in several versions.

Gros Ventre Range Traverse: Up Crystal Creek, down Swift Creek. Climb Antoinette Peak. IMO Swift Creek is as pretty a drainage as you will ever find.

Wind River Range: Ross Lakes with hike of Whiskey Mt. and Ram Flat. Western Approaches to the Winds are the most famous but this gem in the NE section of the Range gets you to serious spectacle much faster than out of Pinedale where most of the "good"/ "great" trips require a full week or more.

Continental Divide between the Teton and Washakie Wildernesses: Off trail to the headwaters of the Yellowstone from Bonneville Pass. The southern end of the Buffalo Plateau is my favorite place on earth.

Southern Absaroka: From 5 pockets Trailhead to Wolfe Creek. going over the Ramshorn Plateau is pretty darn magical. Like the Divide hike I mentioned lots of large mammals including Grizzlies, wolves, etc. There's a reason the Shoshone became the world's first National Forest.

Double Cabin: 4 Pass Loop. The southern Absaroka is arguably the wildest part of Greater Yellowstone. 40 or so miles instead of 100 for a decent Thorofare Trip.

The Beartooths: I have very limited experience there but Jer and others can show you why they are the absolute favorite for many.

I will be happy to share photographs and much more if you message me. If you are thinking you want just Yellowstone because our Mountains can't compare with those closer to you I seriously encourage you to think again. 2 years ago I guided to lovely young ladies from Copenhagen and their jaws were dropped just about the whole trip.

Whatever you do thanks for helping our economy,

John


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Davidsc4 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2013, 10:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Double Cabin, thanks for the thorough reply.

Haha didnt know no ;)

I dont doubt for a second that Yellowstones mountains are breathtaking, and without underrestimating them, I like  elavation change and hiking in mountains.

The trip will be late june or early July, most likely. But I will ofc follow your advice and wait as long as possible.

Thanks for all the suggestions, I will look into it right away.

David, Denmark
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2013, 11:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Early July could still present some problems with snow in the Yellowstone area and the mosquitos could be problematic, but you never know. Depends a lot on what elevation you're at and what the spring and summer were like.  DC's suggestions of two separate trips is a good one.  Maybe one in Yellowstone and then drive to the Absarokas or Beartooths (maybe an hours drive at the most) for another, probably more spectacular hike in many ways.
Don't hesitate to ask specific questions in the future.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2013, 11:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

To early, unless you like wading snow.  A lot of the Park backcountry doesn't even open till mid June and August.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 15 2013, 11:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You should consider moving your trip to the second half of August.  I've been to Wyoming the last three years at the end of August through very early September.  The temps were mild, precip low (two brief thunderstorms this year), streams were low and zero mosquitoes. On my two Winds trips I never used or needed mosquito repellent.  

As others have said April and even May should be eliminated altogether.  June, especially early, can be iffy weather wise.  At some point in June and through July mosquitoes could make you miserable.  2011 was an epic snow year, but the end of August was great in Yellowstone.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 15 2013, 2:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

David,

Despite the great suggestions you've been given come when you can. Early July may not see all the high country opened up and "snow free" and mosquitoes can be problematic [or not at all] but lots of sensational options present themselves. Here's some high country I generally get over 11,000' on by the 4th of July. Yeah, you might have some snow to traverse, but choosing the right time of day it usually works out fine in even "heavy" but not historic [like 2011] years.



By July 10 in most years you can do the "complete" Teton Crest Trail without an Ice Axe. This is Swift Creek, usually well worth it by the 4th of July as are most Southern Gros Ventre Range approaches.



This is the Continental Divide on July 8, 2008. It was a  "heavy" snow year. You could do a lot of spectacular hiking in your time frame.



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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 20 2013, 12:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Davidsc4 - Bear management areas in the Park have restrictions and closures in the spring and early summer that can make a long trip tricky to navigate through or around areas.  Usually by mid-July most areas have opened up for hiking (including off-trail).
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2013, 12:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Aim to start in early July and, in most years, you should be okay.  If it were August or September, I would have recommended the Bechlar area.  

But, since you are talking end of June or early July, I'm steering you towards the Thorofare area.  Be aware that there WILL be mosquitoes, so bring plenty of DEET or other good repellant.  Also, be aware that in early July, the fords of the Yellowstone River, Thorofare Creek and others could be high and difficult to get across.  I was going to suggest starting along the east shore of Yellowstone Lake, and head south on the Thorofare Trail.  Go to Trail Creek Trail and cut west.  Then, at Heart Lake, you can head south and exit near the South Entrance of the park on that road.

If rivers are high, then your best bet would be not to ford them, but to head south into the Absaroka area mentioned by Double Cabin.  That way, your fords won't be until up higher near the headwaters.

Someone mentioned Beartooths.  To do those justice, it has to be later than early July.  At least if you want to get up onto the Beartooth Plateau.

Another area that is pretty remote is the eastern part of Yellowstone.  Go up the Lamar River, and then Miller Creek.  You have options to Frost Lake, Canoe Lake the Hoodoo Basin, and other areas over there, extending into the Shoshone National Forest.  I'd usually make my exit at Pahaska Teepee near the east entrance to Yellowstone.  That could be good for you, but it may be too early in the year also.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2013, 1:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I thought the Thorofare doesn't open [Bear Management] until July 15?

I still respectively disagree with Burntfoot and suggest you leave the Thorofare for a subsequent trip. The skeeters back there would be horrific too. Big reason I suggest mostly higher elevations.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2013, 2:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(double cabin @ Dec. 21 2013, 1:50 pm)
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I thought the Thorofare doesn't open [Bear Management] until July 15?

I still respectively disagree with Burntfoot and suggest you leave the Thorofare for a subsequent trip. The skeeters back there would be horrific too. Big reason I suggest mostly higher elevations.

Agreed. That time of the year I'd be much more fearful of the mosquitos in the Throrofare than of the grizzlies.

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