SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 212>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: 5 Day Hike @ Olympic National Park in September, Hike at Olympic National Park in Septemb< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 7:12 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello all,

My wife and I are training for a 5 day hike at Olympic National Park in the beginning of September. We will be hiking in the rain forest, beaches and camping at South Sand Point > Norwegian Memorial > Chilean Memorial > Rialto Beach.

I have read that September is the driest month but to still expect rain and know how to read tide charts.

We have never camped out on the beach or hiked where rain or tides could be an issue.

Questions:
1. Are the water sources by the camps good for drinking water after filtered?

2. Will the ocean be too cold to go for a swim or is it too shallow?

3. Do you have any other advice or tips for this hike?

Thanks!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
cweston Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2489
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 7:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have heard that the fresh water sources along the coast may have a lot of tannins--the water is perfectly safe to drink, but may be brownish and may not taste all that great.

The ocean is always pretty cold on the Wa coast, but if you have decently warm days, you might be comfortable getting in. Unfortunately, when it is warm inland, it tends to be very cloudy on the ocean coast.
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 10:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cweston @ Aug. 12 2013, 7:33 pm)
QUOTE
I have heard that the fresh water sources along the coast may have a lot of tannins

For people like me who have never heard of Tannins.

Tannins are a natural organic material that can be the byproducts of nature’s fermentation
process, be created as water passes through peaty soil and decaying vegetation. This can cause
water to have a faint yellow to tea-like color, and can cause yellow staining on fabrics, fixtures,
china and laundry.

Tannins may give a tangy or tart aftertaste to water. They may also cause water to have a
musty or earthy odor.

Tannins are considered an aesthetic problem. While they may make water unappealing to
drink and stain laundry, they present no health hazard.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 10:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cweston @ Aug. 12 2013, 7:33 pm)
QUOTE
The ocean is always pretty cold on the Wa coast, but if you have decently warm days, you might be comfortable getting in. Unfortunately, when it is warm inland, it tends to be very cloudy on the ocean coast.

Yeah I had heard of that and I going to try and find a camera filter to help block out the reflections from the clouds.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 10:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just curious, but if the tide is up and it has covered the trail. Can you not walk in it with water shoes?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
cweston Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2489
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 10:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

According to my old tattered copy of "100 hikes in the South Cascades and Olympics," as you head north from Rialto Beach, there are headlands at 6, 10, and 13.5 miles which must be rounded at low tide only. You'll want to take that into account in planning your days. The authors mention a NPS publication called "A Strip of Wilderness" as helpful in trip planning along the beach.
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
cweston Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2489
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 10:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(thegreenthree @ Aug. 12 2013, 9:07 pm)
QUOTE
Just curious, but if the tide is up and it has covered the trail. Can you not walk in it with water shoes?

I haven't hiked extensively on the beach, and what little I did was years ago. (I moved away from the area 20 years ago.)

But my sense is that there usually isn't a trail, except over the headlands. In many places, you could travel at high tide, but in some places it is impossible, where the tide comes in to cliffs or steep slopes.
Online
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 11:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cweston @ Aug. 12 2013, 10:17 pm)
QUOTE
The authors mention a NPS publication called "A Strip of Wilderness" as helpful in trip planning along the beach.

I found the book but my local library has it checked out. I will keep trying. Thanks for book info.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 11:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(cweston @ Aug. 12 2013, 10:21 pm)
QUOTE
But my sense is that there usually isn't a trail, except over the headlands. In many places, you could travel at high tide, but in some places it is impossible, where the tide comes in to cliffs or steep slopes.

Okay, so it is possible but you will have to scale the steep slopes.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 12 2013, 11:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My feet run hot, I use the vasque breeze boots.

Do I need gaiters to keep my boot from getting wet or is this not an issue? I will be wearing pants.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
TheBeef Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 110
Joined: Aug. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 12:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The beach is mostly rocky, but you might want gaiters more for sand than water.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
Gifford Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 89
Joined: Aug. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 1:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Have you trained for hiking in sand, loose, wet, scree like rock, and slippery rocky terrain?

I would wear gaiters. Even a little sand gets into everything.

Giff.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 11:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TheBeef @ Aug. 13 2013, 12:42 am)
QUOTE
The beach is mostly rocky, but you might want gaiters more for sand than water.

Okay good to know. Would you suggest low or high gaiters?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 11:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gifford @ Aug. 13 2013, 1:16 am)
QUOTE
Have you trained for hiking in sand, loose, wet, scree like rock, and slippery rocky terrain?

I would wear gaiters. Even a little sand gets into everything.

Giff.

No we have non of that terrain here, therefore we cannot train in that environment. Never worn gaiters either.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
TheBeef Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 110
Joined: Aug. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 1:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(thegreenthree @ Aug. 13 2013, 11:45 am)
QUOTE

(TheBeef @ Aug. 13 2013, 12:42 am)
QUOTE
The beach is mostly rocky, but you might want gaiters more for sand than water.

Okay good to know. Would you suggest low or high gaiters?

I think the ones that go about halfway up the shin do pretty well. I find ones that go over my calf are more comfortable as I don't need to cinch them at all for them to stay up. ONP is a pretty nice environment if you're dry and warm. It's pretty unforgiving once you're not. You might also look into a light tarp or cloth to stand/sit/change clothes on while you're in camp. I have a friend who makes his own out of Tyvek, and it can't weigh more than a couple ounces.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 13 2013, 6:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TheBeef @ Aug. 13 2013, 1:12 pm)
QUOTE
I think the ones that go about halfway up the shin do pretty well. I find ones that go over my calf are more comfortable as I don't need to cinch them at all for them to stay up. ONP is a pretty nice environment if you're dry and warm. It's pretty unforgiving once you're not. You might also look into a light tarp or cloth to stand/sit/change clothes on while you're in camp. I have a friend who makes his own out of Tyvek, and it can't weigh more than a couple ounces.

Okay, I will get the High gaitors. Great tip on the Tarp, I will add that to the list.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
Random Walker Search for posts by this member.
Born under a wandering star
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2151
Joined: Feb. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2013, 6:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Print up a tide chart
Pick up the Custom Correct Map
Grab your trekking poles (rocky beach/drift log hiking and tide pool poking)
Head out no matter the weather...


--------------
"...adventure without regard to prudence, profit, self-improvement,
learning or any other serious thing"
                                                           -Aldo Leopold-
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 18
GoBlueHiker Search for posts by this member.
Obsessive Island Hopper...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15897
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2013, 10:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Random Walker @ Aug. 15 2013, 4:17 pm)
QUOTE
Print up a tide chart
Pick up the Custom Correct Map
Grab your trekking poles (rocky beach/drift log hiking and tide pool poking)
Head out no matter the weather...

+1 to both links above.  A tide chart is 100% necessary.  Know when high and low tides are.  The Custom Correct maps are the only ones that specifically show you which headlands can only be crossed at low tides, which can be scrambled around (not all of them can) and what tide levels they can safely be traversed.

No, you can't just wade around the headlands at high tide.  Think head-high waves crashing against cliffs.  The Pacific isn't a calm ocean.  The rocky headlands are very beautiful, but not passable at high tide. Trust what the maps say.

Water at the campsites is fine, but you do need to filter it.  Tannins aren't much of a bother, but there's enough other baddies in the water that you need to filter out.

Have a great trip!



--------------
Wealth needs more.  Happiness needs less.  Simplify.

www.RainForestTreks.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 19
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2013, 11:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Random Walker @ Aug. 15 2013, 6:17 pm)
QUOTE
Print up a tide chart
Pick up the Custom Correct Map
Grab your trekking poles (rocky beach/drift log hiking and tide pool poking)
Head out no matter the weather...

Thanks for the tide chart and map.

I am assuming if the tide is lowest at 4:43 AM and highest by 11:08 AM, we need to be at our camp site before 11AM.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2013, 11:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Random Walker @ Aug. 15 2013, 6:17 pm)
QUOTE
Grab your trekking poles (rocky beach/drift log hiking and tide pool poking)
Head out no matter the weather...

Never leave home without them, neither rain nor shine will stop us!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2013, 11:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoBlueHiker @ Aug. 15 2013, 10:29 pm)
QUOTE
The Custom Correct maps are the only ones that specifically show you which headlands can only be crossed at low tides, which can be scrambled around (not all of them can) and what tide levels they can safely be traversed.

No, you can't just wade around the headlands at high tide.  Think head-high waves crashing against cliffs.  The Pacific isn't a calm ocean.  The rocky headlands are very beautiful, but not passable at high tide. Trust what the maps say.

Water at the campsites is fine, but you do need to filter it.  Tannins aren't much of a bother, but there's enough other baddies in the water that you need to filter out.

Have a great trip!


Thanks for the tips. Tides crashing against rock, yeah not a good idea to swim. I will get the map!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
GoBlueHiker Search for posts by this member.
Obsessive Island Hopper...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15897
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 16 2013, 12:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(thegreenthree @ Aug. 15 2013, 9:15 pm)
QUOTE

(Random Walker @ Aug. 15 2013, 6:17 pm)
QUOTE
Print up a tide chart
Pick up the Custom Correct Map
Grab your trekking poles (rocky beach/drift log hiking and tide pool poking)
Head out no matter the weather...

Thanks for the tide chart and map.

I am assuming if the tide is lowest at 4:43 AM and highest by 11:08 AM, we need to be at our camp site before 11AM.

Or, cross the headlands in the late afternoon when the tide runs back out.  That depends on the constraints of your schedule though.

--------------
Wealth needs more.  Happiness needs less.  Simplify.

www.RainForestTreks.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 23
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 9:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoBlueHiker @ Aug. 16 2013, 12:36 am)
QUOTE
Or, cross the headlands in the late afternoon when the tide runs back out.  That depends on the constraints of your schedule though.

Good idea.

Do you know where I could find the GPS coordinates for all the headlands and high tide ares along the coast?

I have been searching online and have found some but not all.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
GoBlueHiker Search for posts by this member.
Obsessive Island Hopper...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15897
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 11:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(thegreenthree @ Aug. 19 2013, 7:43 am)
QUOTE

(GoBlueHiker @ Aug. 16 2013, 12:36 am)
QUOTE
Or, cross the headlands in the late afternoon when the tide runs back out.  That depends on the constraints of your schedule though.

Good idea.

Do you know where I could find the GPS coordinates for all the headlands and high tide ares along the coast?

I have been searching online and have found some but not all.

GPS coords?  Not sure, honestly.  They might be somewhere online, I'm just bot sure.  But the Custom Correct maps have them all listed on the map, along with the exact tide levels (+3.0', for instance) at which each one can be crossed, which is useful info.

http://www.customcorrectmaps.com/

You'd want the "North Olympic Coast" map in the series.


--------------
Wealth needs more.  Happiness needs less.  Simplify.

www.RainForestTreks.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 3:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoBlueHiker @ Aug. 19 2013, 11:57 am)
QUOTE
GPS coords?  Not sure, honestly.  They might be somewhere online, I'm just bot sure.  But the Custom Correct maps have them all listed on the map, along with the exact tide levels (+3.0', for instance) at which each one can be crossed, which is useful info.

http://www.customcorrectmaps.com/

You'd want the "North Olympic Coast" map in the series.

I have heard of these maps and I believe they sell them at the ranger station in port Angeles. The points are maked on the wilderness planning map on nps.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 19 2013, 6:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I will pick up the map at the ranger station
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 21 2013, 12:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Great now I need to find out where the water sources are located so I can plan my water catty schedule.

When I look at a Topo I see there are rivers going by each campsite. Has anyone used these as water sources before?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
GoBlueHiker Search for posts by this member.
Obsessive Island Hopper...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15897
Joined: Jul. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 26 2013, 2:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(thegreenthree @ Aug. 20 2013, 10:31 pm)
QUOTE
Great now I need to find out where the water sources are located so I can plan my water catty schedule.

When I look at a Topo I see there are rivers going by each campsite. Has anyone used these as water sources before?

Yes, those rivers are your water sources.  Some are more heavy in "tannins" than others, but generally speaking the larger the river the better of a source it'll be for you.  But nearly any perennially-running stream will suffice.  Go far enough upstream (up past the sandy beach) so as not to not get brackish/salt water.

Most those rivers cross various private land, fields and roads on their way out to sea.  Be sure to filter/treat it all.  Have a great trip!


--------------
Wealth needs more.  Happiness needs less.  Simplify.

www.RainForestTreks.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 29
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 26 2013, 4:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoBlueHiker @ Aug. 26 2013, 2:29 pm)
QUOTE
Yes, those rivers are your water sources.  Some are more heavy in "tannins" than others, but generally speaking the larger the river the better of a source it'll be for you.  But nearly any perennially-running stream will suffice.  Go far enough upstream (up past the sandy beach) so as not to not get brackish/salt water.

Most those rivers cross various private land, fields and roads on their way out to sea.  Be sure to filter/treat it all.  Have a great trip!

Thanks for the tip, that is good to know.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
thegreenthree Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 262
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 26 2013, 4:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Only a few days to go and the weather looks wet for each day. At least I will get a free Mother Nature shower!
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
34 replies since Aug. 12 2013, 7:12 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 212>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply 5 Day Hike @ Olympic National Park in September
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions