SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 212>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Dolly Sods Wilderness, Multiday hike after Christmas< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 19 2013, 10:30 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hello Everyone!

I've heard a lot about Dolly Sods and am finally getting a chance to go. I plan on driving up from Georgia right after Christmas and plan on spending a few days up there. I've come here to find some good info to help me plan. Hopefully, you can help me answer a few questions, and thanks in advance :)

First, the easy question: what's the best map to get of the area? Can someone provide a link? I've found quite a few, but I'm not sure which one's the best/most up to date.

Second: finding a route. First of all, I'll most likely be going solo, so I'll need an out-and-back or, preferably, a loop. From the maps I see, there appears to be plenty of loops, but I don't know which ones are hard to find in the snow, which ones are really strenuous, or which ones are the most beautiful. I don't want anything too strenuous or long; I don't want to be in a hurry when I see the day's getting short, and be careless because I'm trying to hoof it to get to my destination. I would imagine no more than maybe 6-8 miles/day (totally depending on the conditions).

I'd like to get to the north side - from what I understand, that's the most beautiful area - but I wonder about access. I hear one good access point is via Timberline Resort, but I know nothing about it.

Trails. I hear Blackbird Knob Trail is stunning, but difficult to find. GPS coords would help in this respect. I also hear Bear Rocks Trail is nice. Aside from that, all I really hear is "go north!", so that's what I tend to want to do, but I don't know where I can park.

Could I park at Red Creek Campground and hike west on the Blackbird Knob Trail, turn north along the Upper Red Creek Trail, then on to Raven Ridge Trail, east onto Bear Rocks Trail, then south on some road that appears to be there back to the car? Only looks like about 9 miles though, I'd liek to take my time, but I don't think I could stretch that out to 3 or 4 days :)

Any suggestions?

Thanks for any advice!


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 2
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 19 2013, 11:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And does anyone know anything about an old camper's cabin somewhere?

EDIT: Specifically, the one mentioned here (yes, I know that thread is 10 years old).


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 3
MRHyker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3898
Joined: Dec. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 19 2013, 11:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My website should help you choose a route. The only issue is there will probably be lots of snow and the access roads for the northern part od the Sods will be closed for the winter.

--------------
"Red is the color of the sun with my eyes closed." - Dave Matthews

Midatlantichikes.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 4
vdeal Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1309
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 11:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

MR is right. Check the MVUM maps for the Mon on their website. Gates will probably be closed and if not the road will likely be impassable due to snow unless we have a very mild winter. Be prepared for extreme winter conditions. You should be able to get to the Laneville cabin entrance though. I've never went in via the Timberline ski lift but know that it is an option. If there's any snow at all snowshoes or x-country skis would be advised. As for maps, MR's site is good as are the maps at the WV Highlands Conservancy.

--------------
"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation, INCREASED and NOT IMPAIRED in value." Theodore Roosevelt
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 11:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's a good site with a lot of routes, but I still have the issue of how far north I can get to park. Using the routes you have as a guide, I suppose I can figure out which trails I want to take, but if I don't know where to park, the plans can't be finalized.

Can I reliably park at Timberline Resort? How about Red Creek Campground? I think if I could get to one of these places, I could get north fairly easily. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Thanks for the routes: there are plenty of options and with the descriptions, there are plenty of ways I can mix and match to get just what I'm looking for. :beer:


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 6
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 12:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vdeal @ Nov. 20 2013, 6:10 am)
QUOTE
Check the MVUM maps for the Mon on their website.

I wasn't able to find the MVUM on the usfs website...

I like those maps - they're the most detailed I've seen yet.

From what I see, the road to Red Creek campground will most likely be closed. I may try to get to Timberline; it seems to be the closest I'd be able to get to the north part of the Sods.


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 7
spac3man Search for posts by this member.
Appalachian
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 82
Joined: Jan. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 3:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Winter conditions all around Monongahela NF require excellent navigational skills with a compass. I would settle with no less than a 24x36 waterproof topo map. Definitely plan for possible whiteouts, and low temps of -20°F or colder.

--------------
Sláinte
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 4:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(spac3man @ Nov. 20 2013, 10:59 am)
QUOTE
Winter conditions all around Monongahela NF require excellent navigational skills with a compass. I would settle with no less than a 24x36 waterproof topo map. Definitely plan for possible whiteouts, and low temps of -20°F or colder.

Yeah, I've heard there's maps out there for the Mon NF that are just simply wrong. I'm not a big fan of huge maps, I just want one that's accurate and has got enough detail to read the words and distinguish the topo lines and cover enough area to find major landmarks and a good bit around where I'll be. I've used the Trails Illustrated maps, but they're very hit-or-miss as far as accuracy goes. Same for many USFS maps. I've gotten large maps (the 24x36 you're talking about) and cut them down to size, but that all starts with a good map to start with.

Yep, cold. Real cold. My hardest part is getting out of the tent in the morning. Finally get warmed up and have to put back on my cold boots and get back out into it... But I'll take it to get the reward.

Btw, If I have to hike up from Laneville up the Red Creek trail, how hard is it to cross the creek? Any alternate ways around? This may be yet another reason to try and come in through Timberline...


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 9
spac3man Search for posts by this member.
Appalachian
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 82
Joined: Jan. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 6:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The USGS map I have been using is accurate 1:24000 scale, 1995.

MyTopo
Search quadrants- Blackwater Falls WV
                          Blackbird Knob WV
                          Laneville WV
                          Hopeville WV



Crossing Red Creek is hit or miss because of so much precipitation. Give the Potomac Ranger District a call before you go out, they are very reliable with current conditions. 304-257-4488. I like the Red Creek TH, by Laneville. It is a little less daunting coming in along the Creek at lower elevations.

I hope some of this information helps.


--------------
Sláinte
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
vdeal Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1309
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 7:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

stusic,

The maps I pointed you to before are more than accurate enough. FS75 which takes you to the Red Creek Campground is closed on Dec 31st. Honestly, Laneville Cabin is where most people go in during the winter. The Red Creek crossing could be bad. You can cut up Fisher Spring Run Trail before the crossing and hit FS75 and road walk to Blackbird Knob Tr. There is also a high water route to Little Stonecoal Tr. but in the winter if the snow is bad I'm not sure it would be of much help. There is a road out of Whitegrass Ski area up to the west side of the Sods but in winter I would expect it to be closed. Take this from someone who has spent 25+ years exploring the Mon - either go in at Laneville or ride the ski lift at Timberline. If you want to go to DSN then ride the ski lift. Don't even think about driving FS75 unless it's been super warm. This area is brutal in the winter and the thinking about how to handle it needs to reflect that. To recap, either go in at Laneville Cabin or ride the ski lift. Anything else and we may be digging your car out in May if you even get in. The maps linked are fine. Have fun and stay warm. Prepare for temps well below 0 and wind chills in the -30 or lower category and feel blessed if you don't get those.


--------------
"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation, INCREASED and NOT IMPAIRED in value." Theodore Roosevelt
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 20 2013, 9:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thank you guys heaps for the info. I don't want you to feel like I'm ungrateful, I really do seriously appreciate the help, I just HAVE to know wtf is going on before I head up there. Since I'm going solo to somewhere I've never been in these kind of conditions (and driving 12 hours to get there), I can't "feel it out" as I go - I've got to have a plan A, B, C & D. Granted, the folks in the area forums are better than trail talk, but still...

MRHyker, I think you've helped me out before, but I can't remember when - maybe it was when I went up to Grayson Highlands? It got hairy up there, but was beautiful. I've been a few times since.

Again, I appreciate the help. I think I'm going to try and get up north, so I'll see what Timberline has to say. If the routes for my hike just look better to start at Laneville, I'll do that as a backup.

How's the terrain like up there? Does 6 miles a day sound about right to give me plenty of time?


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 12
MRHyker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3898
Joined: Dec. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 21 2013, 8:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes. It was Mt. Rogers. We're here to help.

--------------
"Red is the color of the sun with my eyes closed." - Dave Matthews

Midatlantichikes.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 13
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 21 2013, 11:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(MRHyker @ Nov. 21 2013, 8:30 am)
QUOTE
Yes. It was Mt. Rogers. We're here to help.

Thank you for that, it was incredibly helpful. Being a Norwegian in Georgia, I love snow but have to travel quite a ways to find it, often to places I've never been before. Without you guys here, I'd be lost or worse :)

The Grayson Highlands has become on of my favorite places. I'm hoping Dolly Sods measures up to that kind of beauty.


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 14
MRHyker Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3898
Joined: Dec. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 21 2013, 1:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The difference between the two places is that with Grayson Highlands you have to hike the elevation gain to get to the snow. With the Sods you have to drive to it. No roads, no hike.

--------------
"Red is the color of the sun with my eyes closed." - Dave Matthews

Midatlantichikes.com
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 15
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 21 2013, 2:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(MRHyker @ Nov. 21 2013, 1:35 pm)
QUOTE
No roads, no hike.

...  or just a longer hike ;)

--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 16
rpcv Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 214
Joined: Aug. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 22 2013, 7:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So, we did an overnight trip into Dolly Sods between Christmas and New Year's last year. We snowshoed up one of the ski runs at Timberline to get to the west side of the wilderness.  

These guys speak truth about the weather up there. There were about two feet of snow on the ground when we started. Overnight, another foot fell. The wind screamed and we think it got down into single digits overnight. We were prepared and it was fine. I've also done some day trips on beautiful bluebird days, but those can turn quickly.

A couple of things to think about:

1. If you aren't familiar with the area and it is snow-covered by then, navigation is a whole different ballgame.

2. By late December, the creeks and bogs are not likely to have frozen over. That can limit where you can travel, even in the north part of Dolly Sods.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but I just wanted to share my experiences.

You can get a sense of snow levels from Whitegrass Ski Area's website.

Pictures from last December's trip.


--------------
Silver Spring Wanderer
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 25 2013, 4:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rpcv @ Nov. 22 2013, 7:35 pm)
QUOTE
So, we did an overnight trip into Dolly Sods between Christmas and New Year's last year. We snowshoed up one of the ski runs at Timberline to get to the west side of the wilderness.  

These guys speak truth about the weather up there. There were about two feet of snow on the ground when we started. Overnight, another foot fell. The wind screamed and we think it got down into single digits overnight. We were prepared and it was fine. I've also done some day trips on beautiful bluebird days, but those can turn quickly.

A couple of things to think about:

1. If you aren't familiar with the area and it is snow-covered by then, navigation is a whole different ballgame.

2. By late December, the creeks and bogs are not likely to have frozen over. That can limit where you can travel, even in the north part of Dolly Sods.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but I just wanted to share my experiences.

You can get a sense of snow levels from Whitegrass Ski Area's website.

Pictures from last December's trip.

Good stuff. I think I'm going to go in the same way you did, through Timberline, and make a loop. I'm planning on 4 days/3 nights (really a half day at the beggining and end) for two full day of hiking, making camp near the exit on the first and last nights. I'm trying to find trails that aren't wet or particularly strenuous.

I'm also trying to really get to know the area as best as I can before heading up. I've got some good maps now and a few good wintertime trail reports to work from. Just gotta nail down a few routes I can take, then prioritize them so I can have a few backups if one doesn't work out. I am liking that there seems to be plenty of trails that shortcut out of there if it gets hairy.

I think my only concern is my tent (a HS Double Rainbow), but even that's treated me well in less than ideal conditions. It can withstand a lot if you find the right place for it; I'll need to find a sheltered area for camp, somewhere with trees that cut down the harsh wind that you find in open areas. It seems to handle a snowload pretty well when it's guyed out.

I won't be pulling a sled, but it sounds like a fantastic idea. Snowshoes and a pack for me! For warmth, I've got a closed cell pad that'll be under my inflatable. On top of that, I've got a great 0deg synthetic bag, which I line with a sea-to-summit thermolite reactor. I love that thing.

On top of that, I've got all the typical clothes you'd find (down coat, fleece jacket, balaclava, gloves, snow pants, gaiters, yummy wool socks, sunglasses, fleece hat, hard shell...). And all that crap on me or my back.

How the hell do people go UL in this kind of weather?! On top of all that stuff, I've got my stove (msr whisperlite), fuel, pot, bowl, spork, thermos, GPS, Spot messenger, a kindle, headlamp, batteries, etc...

From what I've read, fires are generally discouraged. I would think in the winter it'd be alright, but I normally don't build a fire anyways - either too tired or too cold to fiddle with it.

What are your thoughts?


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 18
spac3man Search for posts by this member.
Appalachian
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 82
Joined: Jan. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 25 2013, 7:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you snoop around on the web, you will find quite a bit of information indicating primitive campsites, and where they are located. Almost all of them have a fire pit, and they are regularly used. You might want to consider setting up a base of operations once you find a site you like... at least for day two possibly.

--------------
Sláinte
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 1:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(spac3man @ Nov. 25 2013, 7:58 pm)
QUOTE
If you snoop around on the web, you will find quite a bit of information indicating primitive campsites, and where they are located. Almost all of them have a fire pit, and they are regularly used. You might want to consider setting up a base of operations once you find a site you like... at least for day two possibly.

That's awesome. I was just looking at mapsource, wondering how to split it up, then I read this. I think that sounds great.

So what's the best campsite to use as a basecamp around the north sods?

I was looking at a "lone deciduous fruit tree" campsite in a spruce grove (shown here, approach in yellow) near the junction of Raven Ridge Tr and Beaver View Tr.

There's also the old hiker cabin I would love to check out if it's still there. Anyone know where that's at?

Heck yeah, great idea spac3man.


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 20
vdeal Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1309
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 10:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There are no hiker cabins in Dolly Sods. I believe there were maybe 20 years ago but they're gone now.

--------------
"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation, INCREASED and NOT IMPAIRED in value." Theodore Roosevelt
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 10:29 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vdeal @ Nov. 26 2013, 10:20 am)
QUOTE
There are no hiker cabins in Dolly Sods. I believe there were maybe 20 years ago but they're gone now.

I was hoping that wasn't the case. Through my reading I learned there had been a bunch, then the FS destroyed all but one (the one referenced in the link). That link was 10 years old, so I wasn't sure if it'd still be around. Thought it'd make a cool photo.

--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 22
vdeal Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1309
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 12:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Stusic,

I finally read through that link to the DCSki page. There's some interesting info there but it's badly outdated. The road info is not entirely correct and some of the people who claim to be locals are giving patently incorrect information especially regarding Roaring Plains which isn't on your plans. As for the cabin, I still can't figure out where they're saying it's at (or was) but I know of none and if it still exists it's gonna be uber-difficult to find based on that info. The terraserver links are no good anymore either.


--------------
"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation, INCREASED and NOT IMPAIRED in value." Theodore Roosevelt
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 12:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vdeal @ Nov. 26 2013, 12:09 pm)
QUOTE
... As for the cabin, I still can't figure out where they're saying it's at (or was) but I know of none and if it still exists it's gonna be uber-difficult to find based on that info. The terraserver links are no good anymore either.

Yeah, I figured it was a longshot. I think is/was just south of Rocky Knob, so I may go try and see if I can find the location and if anything remains. By reversing the route I have in mind (the route in yellow in my link, then heading west to the northwest corner, then south), and going clockwise, I could have time to check it out and not be too far from a camp if I don't find it. Ah, it might be wrth a look if I'll be passing by anyways.

Do you know anything about campsite in the spruce thicket described on MRHyker's page (the campsite in my link)? Is it good?

Sorry for any dumb questions.


--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 24
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 1:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Whelp, nevermind, it's gone for sure.

--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
vdeal Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1309
Joined: Feb. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 1:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

stusic,

Thanks for the link. Still not real certain where the cabin was. Maybe I'll try to find the remains sometime. I did find pictures though - Here's the link of the destroyed cabin.


--------------
"The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation, INCREASED and NOT IMPAIRED in value." Theodore Roosevelt
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 26 2013, 3:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vdeal @ Nov. 26 2013, 1:57 pm)
QUOTE
stusic,

Thanks for the link. Still not real certain where the cabin was. Maybe I'll try to find the remains sometime. I did find pictures though - Here's the link of the destroyed cabin.

Hey thanks. I was having a real hard time finding anything relevent. Try searching for anything with "cabin" and not finding Cabin Mountain and vacation cabins...

--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 27
kellem Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 737
Joined: Jun. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 28 2013, 3:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I want a trip report and some pics :)
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
stusic Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sep. 2006
PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 9:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(kellem @ Nov. 28 2013, 3:38 pm)
QUOTE
I want a trip report and some pics :)

It's the least I can do.

--------------


Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 29
spac3man Search for posts by this member.
Appalachian
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 82
Joined: Jan. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 1:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Good fortunes to you, have a great time!

--------------
Sláinte
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
Hollowdweller Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 618
Joined: Aug. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 02 2013, 5:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

My friend claimed to have been to the cabin when he was younger, and claimed it was somewhere in the area of the railroad grade that you walk on to go over the hill to the gravel road that leads to haystack.

I recall a discussion where somebody claimed they were torn down.

So the little sub path, barely discernable now, that went down to where the cabin was on Cabin Mt? Was that one of the cabins or an earlier private one or something??

I have never hiked in DS in the snow. Does the snow pack down to the point that it smooths out the rocks??
I've always thought as rocky as some places are that it would be easy to break an ankle by going down between 2 submerged rocks.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
46 replies since Nov. 19 2013, 10:30 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 212>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Dolly Sods Wilderness
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions