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Topic: Intro, hike in NH, questions, etc< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 12:59 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Haven't introduced myself yet, i'm Justin and i'm somewhat new to the lite hiking world in practice but not so much in theory.  I don't ever plan on becoming a gram counter, but i am interested in cutting down weight and non essentials but doing so in a cheaper and resourceful manner since i don't have a lot of money to spend on frivolous and short life span equipment (i will shell out the big bucks for more long term, long lasting/durable, true survival gear, and have been lately).

 Anyways, my buddy and i, starting in mid June are doing a 6 day, about 60 mile hike in the White Mountains of NH near Mt Washington area.  He's planned the route, timing, etc. and i've provided most of the shared, essential gear.  

 He wants me to bring my Titanium Goat "large" titanium, portable wood stove and Versa 6.5 tent.  The stove weighs about 3.5 lbs and packs down pretty compact, and the tent about the same (a little more).   I was thinking more lite weight and minimalist camping.   Like a tarp, some bug net bivies.  

 He is more stubborn and traditional/mainstream than i, but i would like to test this gear out sometime, and i figure, if we can divvy up the weight of both half to each, then it shouldn't be too bad overall.  Lol, is that just wishful thinking?!

 Shoes are a concern, i bought and just received some discounted, Teva hiking shoes from STP which are waterproof and "breathable" (T.I.D.E?) so called.  Great tread, but problem is, they barely fit as is--especially they are somewhat too narrow.   Feet tend to swell during hikes, and if they are that tight as it is....   I'm thinking i should send them back.  

 I have a back up pair of "shoes" i bought at Costco for 29 dollars.  They are a pretty sturdy (for a water shoe) but very lite, Speedo brand "water shoe" with a quite grippy tread which would be great for rocks and slippery wet conditions, but being so flat and  having so little pronounced tread, probably would suck on loose dirt, gravel, etc, especially down hill.  

 I've thought about making some mods to the tread to help increase traction for dirt, gravel, etc, but don't really know how to go about doing so.  I tried a small, and somewhat sharp knife and that didn't work very well.  Besides, i don't know what kind of patterns would work well.  

Anyone with any experience with this who could offer some tips or suggestions?  Should i just forgo them altogether and get a sturdier, better tread  pair of shoes like the Tevas but better fitting?  

 Also, while i know that the weather and climate tends to be a bit extreme and unpredictable in this area, anyone hike mid June for a week or so up around the 4000 or so elevations in this area?   Should i plan for some rather cold nights?  

 I don't use a sleeping bag or modern "quilt", but use layered, lighter and thinner but very warm small throw blankets (all either silk or alpaca).  Can and should i pack less of these since i'm bringing some rather warm clothes (again alpaca and silk mostly, with some angora/lambs wool thrown in) and a wood stove?  

 To be honest, using all  of my blankets would be a good deal heavier than most lighter weight sleeping bags and especially quilts.  If say i used the silk sleep sack, the heavier, bigger and warmer alpaca blanket, with the silk noil "blanket", and put a mylar space blanket on the very top, do you think condensation would be an issue?  

 The silk and especially alpaca is so breathable and body vapor should escape some on the sides since the mylar will not be pulled close around me as people usually use it for emergencies, but more laying loosely on top to help reflect the heat radiation back down.   Dunno, what do you all think?  Just keep in mind how much more breathable silk and especially alpaca are than any non mesh, tightly woven synthetic as found in almost all sleeping bags and quilts are.  

 I also have my wool kilt as a narrow, mini blanket i could put under the mylar to help raise it up some more.  I really don't want to use the mylar if condensation will be an issue.  Maybe i should test it in the backyard first, but there are no cold nights of late here in VA....
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 1:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Seen you make a few posts (and even jokingly mocked your trail bar recipe in good fun - I have lots of practice resisting new age health food as my fiancee is all about it right now, right down to the Chia seeds), but welcome Justin.

I am not nearly as experienced as a lot of other folks around here, so I can't and won't speak to the technical stuff like your blanket layering technique as to not mislead you in a dangerous way if I was wrong, but I've lived in New England all my life (Boston now, south of Boston growing up) and have spent a fair amount of time in the Whites.  I have yet to backpack through the Whites (but have car camped), but am kickstarting that this year.  Anyway, that's all to make two points:

1.) consider your footwear carefully - I know there is a trend to "minimalize" footwear on the trails and I am planning on doing this myself at some point, but the Whites are notoriously brutal on feet.  Lots of nice jagged rocks and roots all over the trails.  So not saying you couldn't do it in a water shoe, but I don't think I'd hike 60 miles in the Whites without a nice, thick-soled boot (A nice Merrill light hiker with a Vibram sole is a good "lighter-weight" option - I got a great deal on a pair at Marshall's).

2.) Will you have some cold nights in June?  Maybe...  This is New England after all, and even in June you could experience all four seasons over the course of a week.  Ever hear of Thunder Snow?  It could happen!  But seriously, weather is quite unpredictable and my advice would be to check local forecasts, pack appropriately, and still pack something (a warmer pair of baselayers perhaps) just in case it gets colder than you expect. I know packing extra "just in case" doesn't fly well with the go light mantra, but June is still a tough month to judge for a week long trip in the Whites in my opinion.

Other's will be sure to chime in soon, and probably with better advice than me, so take it for it's price and find a YouTube clip with Lewis Black (the comedian) talking about weather in New England.

Oh yeah and have fun!!!


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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 2:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sixty miles. Figure five days?

As for the tent, sounds good. I think a down sleeping bag is the way to go, perhaps a 20° bag. Surely much lighter than your set up, and often half the weight of synthetic, and half the bulk, as well. Well treated, it could last you twenty years. Lightweight sleeping pads. Thermarest make some of the best. The Neoair line is pricey, and by no means necessary. Take a look on backcountry.com, campmor.com and others for good deals.

As for footwear - maybe the most important of all of them. Chances are you'll blow out a pair of $29 shoes. Being 45 miles from home when that happens would suck. I am myself a budget backpacker and buy Hi-Techs. Good boot. I'm sure I've put over 150 miles on mine and they're still sturdy and comfortable. The Catskills try to kill boots.

Good idea to have a wood stove, maybe two, but small ones. I assume you'll be boiling water, so no need for a long-burning solution. Long enough to get the teapot boiling.

Uh-oh folks. He went and said it - KILT. And he's a vegetarian; no bacon. And he probably adores beets...


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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 3:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This is so out there that I almost feel like you're having fun with us.

Are you serious? A Ti-Goat and Versa 6.5 tent? Where do you think you're going, the river of no return in January? Are you bringing the sled and the dogs too?
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 4:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1 on the down bag.  My stove is 3.5 ozs.  I boil water.  A few cans of fuel and it will burn a long time.  Boots.  Get GOOD boots.  I can't imagine hiking in anything else up here.  I stopped trying to guess the weather up here in Maine.  86 last month, picking peppers in the garden last fall covered in snow?  Who knows?

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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 5:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Eastie Trekkie,

Thanks for the reply. I hear you on the good shoes thing.  Yah, since i'm originally from MA myself, i know all about the lovely weather, and the White Mountains are even worse.  

P.S. i'm originally from the Tewksbury, Lowell, Chelmsford area mostly, with a little time in Rockport and Amesbury.  

 I guess i'm mainly interested in teh question about the mylar and whether or not it will faciliate undue condensation despite the ultra breathable fabrics.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 5:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Bigsilk,

 We have 6 days to do it.

Thanks for the tips.  No doubt a down sleeping bag would pack much more lite and less bulky than my set up (though silk and alpaca are quite lite).  Problem is, good and even just decent quality down sleeping bags are quite expensive, and after buying some of my long term survival gear, i don't have a lot of spending money currently and the trip is coming up in a month.  

Besides, i probably don't need to bring more than the two blankets (one alpaca and one silk) and silk liner bag, since i am already brining some super warm clothes.  For example, i have 1 pair of 80% baby alpaca and 20% wool, liteweight pants.  A medium weight alpaca turtle neck, a uber lite silk top and bottom, alpaca socks, etc.  If  you have ever worn a combination of silk and alpaca, you understand how incredibly warm it is.  

Yep, i have a thermarest EZ lite regular, with two squares cut off--just long enough for being 5' 7".  The short version was just a bit too short.  

Definitely seriously considering what you said about the shoes.

 I've been looking at the mKettle, but again, finances are a bit tight right now.  

 Aye Laddy, a Kilt--while i have plenty o'Scottish hertiage, (presumbaly of the Highland variety), i don't wear it for hiking because of that, but because of the comfort and practicality.  Feels better.  Lol, well i use to like bacon when i ate it...  and beets..not so much, but i do like a drink i get at Trader Joes which is Beet Juice, Purple Carrot, and a little Lemon.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 5:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Fox @ May 09 2012, 3:25 pm)
QUOTE
This is so out there that I almost feel like you're having fun with us.

Are you serious? A Ti-Goat and Versa 6.5 tent? Where do you think you're going, the river of no return in January? Are you bringing the sled and the dogs too?

Admittedly, i am a bit out there to some, but i am quite serious.  Earlier, i clearly explained that it was my friends preference to bring the stove and Versa tent, and that i was leaning more to a tarp and bug net bivy dealio.  

 The only reason why i'm going along with it, is because i would like to test it out in some real world conditions, and i don't have the kind of job where i can just take off time whenever i feel like it.  This is a rare, opportune time to test out this equipment, which is less for hiking and camping, but long term survival in the wilderness.

 But yeah, i agree it's over kill for this hike during this time.  However, i looked up the weather site for MT. Washington and was quite surprised to find that in 1945 they recorded a record low of 8 degrees in June!  Not that this is likely to repeat itself during our hike, but i guess we would be pretty happy for the stove if we did.  With him carrying half and me carrying half, the stove only weights about 1 lb and 7 ounces.  

 Anyways, my earlier question (the one i'm most interested in) hasn't been addressed yet.   If i used two lite/thin and quite breathable but very warm blankets, with a silk liner, and my Wool kilt, but with mylar placed "loosely" on top, do you think condensation would build up?   If no appreciable condensation would build up, and i use just the two smaller throw blankets with the mylar, etc, this would really cut the weight down.  Not down to a good quality down quilt, but not so far from it either.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 6:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(bad knees @ May 09 2012, 4:24 pm)
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+1 on the down bag.  My stove is 3.5 ozs.  I boil water.  A few cans of fuel and it will burn a long time.  Boots.  Get GOOD boots.  I can't imagine hiking in anything else up here.  I stopped trying to guess the weather up here in Maine.  86 last month, picking peppers in the garden last fall covered in snow?  Who knows?

Yah, i would love a super lite, high quality down quilt, but can't afford one right now or before the hike comes up.  Is your stove 3.5 ozs with the few cans of fuel, or without?    

Re: boots, i am leaning to foregoing the water shoes i mentioned to a more hiking type shoe, but honestly, i've never hiked in boots and have had no problems.  I've hiked up and down Mt. Washington a few times now and never had boots and did fine.  When i did El Camino in Spain, some 500 miles i used a combo of sandals (with socks) and a sturdy hiking shoe, and was quite literally the ONLY person i met that whole time who never had one blister.  

 Yep, sure seems like Mother nature has gotten a bit extreme of late.  

Thanks for the advice Badknees.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2012, 7:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What's your overall pack weight?  That should be of some interest with regards to footwear.  The Whites are pretty butch, and your feet will take a beating, especially on descents with weight.  Then again, I once met a woman on Giant Mtn in the Dacks, who was lugging about 30 lbs, and she hiked in Teva's.....

Weather in June...I'd be prepared for lows in the 20's, if you're camping above 3K feet.  It may not get there, and you can make a game time decision, but you might want to be prepped for those temps.  Not sure at all on how your set up will work...nothing beats an empirical study......if it were me, I'd probably have given it a whirl already, just to see.

Blackflies should be pretty nasty in the lower elevations.

Enjoy!
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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2012, 12:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Glen,

 I'm still adjusting the weight some (mostly with clothes), but so far i'm guesstimating from around 14 lbs min. to 17 lbs max., but that's without food. I'm not sure how much food i will add and how much weight that will add.  I plan on bringing a lot of relatively lite foods, homemade dehydrated type foods mostly.  

 I've learned that i don't need to eat as much as i use to think.  I've experimented with fasting some lately.  Did a 7 day very low calorie, liquid fast a couple of months ago while being somewhat active (half hour walks everyday, etc).  I definitely don't plan on fasting for the hike, but again, i've learned that the body doesn't need as much food as the mind often thinks, but i do understand that more intense activity does require more fuel unless you're like Yeshua (Jesus) and live on Light.  

 I guess a somewhat sturdy shoe might be in order...?   Thanks, i'm sure i will enjoy, can't wait to meditate out there and soak up all the beauty.  May you enjoy any upcoming hikes as well.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2012, 7:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LiteMan @ May 09 2012, 6:06 pm)
QUOTE

(bad knees @ May 09 2012, 4:24 pm)
QUOTE
+1 on the down bag.  My stove is 3.5 ozs.  I boil water.  A few cans of fuel and it will burn a long time.  Boots.  Get GOOD boots.  I can't imagine hiking in anything else up here.  I stopped trying to guess the weather up here in Maine.  86 last month, picking peppers in the garden last fall covered in snow?  Who knows?

Yah, i would love a super lite, high quality down quilt, but can't afford one right now or before the hike comes up.  Is your stove 3.5 ozs with the few cans of fuel, or without?    

Re: boots, i am leaning to foregoing the water shoes i mentioned to a more hiking type shoe, but honestly, i've never hiked in boots and have had no problems.  I've hiked up and down Mt. Washington a few times now and never had boots and did fine.  When i did El Camino in Spain, some 500 miles i used a combo of sandals (with socks) and a sturdy hiking shoe, and was quite literally the ONLY person i met that whole time who never had one blister.  

 Yep, sure seems like Mother nature has gotten a bit extreme of late.  

Thanks for the advice Badknees.

No thats without the fuel, but I was just making a point about the weight.  As my name implies, I need and prefer good boots for support, etc...  But hey if you can hike in teva's then what the heck.  It's all good.  I just try to shave weight off each trip.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2012, 10:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LiteMan @ May 09 2012, 5:58 pm)
QUOTE

(Fox @ May 09 2012, 3:25 pm)
QUOTE
This is so out there that I almost feel like you're having fun with us.

Are you serious? A Ti-Goat and Versa 6.5 tent? Where do you think you're going, the river of no return in January? Are you bringing the sled and the dogs too?

Admittedly, i am a bit out there to some, but i am quite serious.  Earlier, i clearly explained that it was my friends preference to bring the stove and Versa tent, and that i was leaning more to a tarp and bug net bivy dealio.  

 The only reason why i'm going along with it, is because i would like to test it out in some real world conditions, and i don't have the kind of job where i can just take off time whenever i feel like it.  This is a rare, opportune time to test out this equipment, which is less for hiking and camping, but long term survival in the wilderness.

 But yeah, i agree it's over kill for this hike during this time.  However, i looked up the weather site for MT. Washington and was quite surprised to find that in 1945 they recorded a record low of 8 degrees in June!  Not that this is likely to repeat itself during our hike, but i guess we would be pretty happy for the stove if we did.  With him carrying half and me carrying half, the stove only weights about 1 lb and 7 ounces.  

 Anyways, my earlier question (the one i'm most interested in) hasn't been addressed yet.   If i used two lite/thin and quite breathable but very warm blankets, with a silk liner, and my Wool kilt, but with mylar placed "loosely" on top, do you think condensation would build up?   If no appreciable condensation would build up, and i use just the two smaller throw blankets with the mylar, etc, this would really cut the weight down.  Not down to a good quality down quilt, but not so far from it either.

Total agree /  I've got a Cannon Ball for these guy to pack also /
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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2012, 5:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi 2Dogs 1, please tell my friend this! LOL   The more i think about it, the more i want to forgo at least the stove.  Really, i would be happy with a bug net bivy and tarp set up.  But with him carrying the one carbon fiber pole and the stakes and me the tent material, (or vice versa) all in all, it's not that heavy.  Definitely not the vaunted UL standard by any means, but not super heavy hiking/camping of yester year either.  

 Thanks Badknees, i am trying to shave some weight off.  I'm hoping my Silk liner stuffed with Kapot works ok--it will be definitely lighter than my original plan of a couple throw blankets.  I plan on a total weight of my homemade quilt to be around 2 lbs and 9 oz or so.  Since i have some rather warm clothes with me, i'm not too worried about getting too cold.

Re: the shoes, i've decided to bring a pair of sturdy hiking shoes.  
But...and you're probably think me really out there, i have a pair of boiled wool slippers with a gummed "sole" and i'm curious what that would feel like on the ascent and/or level parts.  Since they are extremely lite--i'm going to bring them to try out going up the first day, if it's not raining.  I got these things really cheap so i'm not worried about them falling apart.  I wouldn't dream of wearing them down any steeper descents though.

  I'm somewhat a fan of Cody Lundin and like his idea of walking barefoot, but i don't have tough feet like him, and i'm carrying a somewhat heavy pack and on very rocky areas so i need some protection.  Well, let's just say, i'm a very curious person and want to see what it's like, and i will have my sturdy hiking shoes if it's not feasible.  

 It's quite interesting to know that many different indigenous tribes who didn't wear shoes but went barefoot or had mininal covering with no hard soles, actually tended to have much less issues with their knees, feet, backs, etc. than modern people with their hard and completely flat artificial soles.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2012, 6:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LiteMan @ May 10 2012, 5:58 pm)
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Hi 2Dogs 1, please tell my friend this! LOL   The more i think about it, the more i want to forgo at least the stove.  Really, i would be happy with a bug net bivy and tarp set up.  But with him carrying the one carbon fiber pole and the stakes and me the tent material, (or vice versa) all in all, it's not that heavy.  Definitely not the vaunted UL standard by any means, but not super heavy hiking/camping of yester year either.  

 Thanks Badknees, i am trying to shave some weight off.  I'm hoping my Silk liner stuffed with Kapot works ok--it will be definitely lighter than my original plan of a couple throw blankets.  I plan on a total weight of my homemade quilt to be around 2 lbs and 9 oz or so.  Since i have some rather warm clothes with me, i'm not too worried about getting too cold.

Re: the shoes, i've decided to bring a pair of sturdy hiking shoes.  
But...and you're probably think me really out there, i have a pair of boiled wool slippers with a gummed "sole" and i'm curious what that would feel like on the ascent and/or level parts.  Since they are extremely lite--i'm going to bring them to try out going up the first day, if it's not raining.  I got these things really cheap so i'm not worried about them falling apart.  I wouldn't dream of wearing them down any steeper descents though.

  I'm somewhat a fan of Cody Lundin and like his idea of walking barefoot, but i don't have tough feet like him, and i'm carrying a somewhat heavy pack and on very rocky areas so i need some protection.  Well, let's just say, i'm a very curious person and want to see what it's like, and i will have my sturdy hiking shoes if it's not feasible.  

 It's quite interesting to know that many different indigenous tribes who didn't wear shoes but went barefoot or had mininal covering with no hard soles, actually tended to have much less issues with their knees, feet, backs, etc. than modern people with their hard and completely flat artificial soles.

I too love Cody, but at this point I am making an appointment with my doctor for you.  I kid of course.  It's all good when you are outside.  As a scout master I say Don't get hurt, and have fun!  But really, a 3.5 lb stove?  Is it a Viking? :D

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PostIcon Posted on: May 11 2012, 1:37 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi Badknees...

 No, no, no, it's not a cookstove per se.  It's a portable, space heating wood stove that goes in the tent which comes with a fiberglass stove boot to put the 7.5 feet piping up through.

This is why it weighs 3.5 lbs.  With it, i don't even need a quilt really, as long as one of us is feeding the fire every so often during the night.  

 Like i said, i made the mistake of mentioning my new purchase to my friend, and now he is stuck on the idea of bringing this bad arse gear despite the weight and the season.   I tried to convince him, hey, maybe we should just do a lite tarp and bug net bivies or some such set up.  

 Nope, he's a stubborn one, and i'm the more flexible one.  He's that kind of guy who does a 2 day hike with the really big and heavy pack. (i suspect that he also doesn't want to spend any money on getting a bivy or the like)  Like i said, the only reason why i'm conceding is because i would like to test this LONGTERM, Wilderness survival gear out in real world before i have to actually use it.   Since i just got it a little while ago, i haven't tested it out yet.  Nor is backyard enough for me right now when my local weather is so warm.  Ironically, in a month, it will be colder at night or possibly even in the day where i'm going, than it currently is at nights here.  

 But at least the stove and tent weight can be divvied up pretty equally between us.  He's my bro, ultimately i care more about his happiness than my temporal comfort, and if it makes him happy having this set up and he's willing to carry half, then so be it.  

 Sort of along the lines of, for 10 years i was straight vegetarian, and when i moved out of state, he forgot that but remembered i was into healthy and organic stuff.  He bought an organic chicken for our camp trip, thinking i would appreciate it (not normally something he would do) and well, i said hey, vegetarian or not, in the spirit of Love, i will eat this unappetizing animal carcass.  (actually, being pretty hungry at the time, also made it easier and more appetizing too ;-)  

  So, i'm a bit torn, bring it or not?  I realize i don't need that 3.5 lbs really.  Geez, i may not be UL like some folks here, but i'm not that ignorant.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2012, 5:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

LiteMan
You do whatever you want to do but just tio fill you in...
those stoves are really not designed for hiker but for campers, more specifically hunters and survivalists that want to spend a week or several in one spot.
So you carry a heavy load there but you have your comforts for the rest of the time.
My bet is that after the first night or two (moving from one campsite to another) you will not any longer set up the stove.
Contrary to what appears to be obvious (less clothing/lighter sleeping bag needed) that is not the case because you need to feed them (the stove that is) two or three times every hour.
That is fun (or can be) between say 6pm an 10-11 PM but maybe not so much after that...
(your shelter will be at outside temp about 10min after the stove runs out of fuel)
Anyway again you do what you like.
Franco
BTW, yes I am familiar with that "idea"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v....re=plcp
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2012, 8:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LiteMan @ May 10 2012, 5:58 pm)
QUOTE
But...and you're probably think me really out there, i have a pair of boiled wool slippers with a gummed "sole" and i'm curious what that would feel like on the ascent and/or level parts.

I give you 5 minutes before you change into your shoes.

It sounds like this trip will certainly be a learning experience. Bring the stove... Hike in slippers... Cut your food rations... don't worry if it's SOP or not. It's all part of the experience. If it works, great! If not, you and your bro will have stories of backcountry misery to tell for years to come.

Good luck with your trip! And you HAVE to report back to us!


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2012, 11:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

10 miles per day is about the right pace for full packs up there. Once out of tree line, it's like walking on the moon, wide open 360° exposure n rocks.

I agree with WWBF that it is your hike and the best stories n learning experiances are made this way. I've got some epic stories from trips like yours. Be sure to bring your brains, map n compass, get to know your route by heart n all the trail junctions you might cross, as that is where peoplle get turned around.

I'd rather see you drop that heavy stove for a pocket rocket n change the boots to someting more sturdy. Yes you can do it barefoot, some have done it.

The tent, well splitting it up means @3lbs each n that is bearable if you lose the heavy stove which of course can mean an extra 2LBs of water won't have much impackt on your total weight.

The tarp may be an alternative but bad weather is more common up there n it can turn on a dime despite the predictions. I've been caught in ice storms in mid August.

Your sleeping bag arrangement is fine, if it does get cold, just wear everything you brought n be sure to bring enough layers to cover your worst conditions. You do know to subtract 3° for every 1000' of elevation? Check the Mt Wash observatory site for weather before you leave base?

You guys will have a blast up there! I'm keeping an eye out for your TR. We all want to hear your fun experinaces.

Be safe n have fun!

.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2012, 8:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A popular type of shoe with UL hikers here in Australia is the Dunlop Volley. ($20-30 AUD)
Canvas top and rubber sole , very grippy.
However that has laces and that is how you can keep them on.
Without them the chance of the foot sliding off is a bit too high in my view..
(heavy leather boot users spend a lot of time and energy telling the Volley users that they don't work. However the Volley users keep using them)

Franco
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2012, 7:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Franco @ Jun. 01 2012, 8:21 pm)
QUOTE
A popular type of shoe with UL hikers here in Australia is the Dunlop Volley. ($20-30 AUD)
Canvas top and rubber sole , very grippy.
However that has laces and that is how you can keep them on.
Without them the chance of the foot sliding off is a bit too high in my view..
(heavy leather boot users spend a lot of time and energy telling the Volley users that they don't work. However the Volley users keep using them)

Franco

Canvas? You've got too many posts to be serious. One dunk in the pool and you're talking some seriously cold feet.

If you're talking sneakers (sneakers, really?) better to talk Hi-Tecs. Inexpensive, light, and solid. My Outlanders aren't WP, are synthetic, and have served me so very well for their price.

See my avatar? It was rather chilly out. The model I'm talking about is the model I'm wearing. Trust me, it got good and cold that night. Never a tingle out of my dogs wearing my Hi-Tecs, even when just standing around.

YMMV.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2012, 7:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I didn't  say I that I use them... (I do light and comfy not UL)
The main reason for using them is the grip, very good on wet rocks , that is wet trails not climbing...
When you are walking a wet shoe is not a problem (well not for me) at camp is another matter.
(my camp strategy with wet runners/boots is to wear my night socks (liners) then a plastic bag on top (or VB socks if I expected that situation) then my wet socks on top of that and unlaced runners ).

BTW, the number of posts does not really count. One of the guys that knew (in practice) the least had the most posts around here...
Or if you prefer, my grandma cooked pasta for about 80 years but never well...
Franco
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunlop_Volley
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 15 2012, 8:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I notice that we never heard back on the big survival trip. Must not have survived...

I hope they just got tired the first day and went home safe and sound.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 15 2012, 10:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

ummm I'm wondering the same thing.

I'd love to hear how the sneakers worked in the Whites.. that is definately not a shoe for the rock up there.

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(camper10469 @ Jul. 15 2012, 10:27 pm)
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I'd love to hear how the sneakers worked in the Whites.. that is definately not a shoe for the rock up there.

Plenty of people wearing them though.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 16 2012, 9:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've noticed that. Last summer, in the ADKs, there were so many sneakers on the top of the mountian, also no water bottles, no day packs... etc.

I also noticed more people getting knee replacements these days.

Curious.

:)?


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 26 2012, 10:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

OK, you are back on the forum (and playing a little nicer;-) so tell us how the trip went.

Did the stove work? What was your pack weights? Did the shoes work out? Did you smoke your shirt? (Sorry, couldn't help it.)


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