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Topic: Huntington Ravine Trail, Degree of difficulty?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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GlenG Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 15 2012, 6:59 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Doing a little pre trip planning, and this has been on the list for some time.  Never made it yet, for various reasons.  But this year, looks do-able.  However, my 12 y/o is still somewhat of a question as to whether or not he's able, because I've never hiked it either.  Last year though, we knocked out the King Ravine and Adams, and depsite it being just grueling for him, he made it.  The other kick butt, quasi dangerous trail that I did was Flume Slide, and I think he can handle that.  I've also hiked The Tuck and the Ammonoosuc Ravine and don't feel eith of those can hold a candle to King Ravine or Flume Slide, with regards to the potential for disaster.

Has anybody hiked the Huntington Ravine and any of these other ones, and can provide some detail on how much harder the Huntington Ravine is compared to Flume Slide and King Ravine?  

Thanks in advance!
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WalksWithBlackflies Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 16 2012, 1:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I did them a few years apart, but from what I remember, Huntington was a bit harder than Kings... more slabby with a greater sense of exposure. If he was good on Kings, go for it!

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When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be. - Lao Tzu
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GlenG Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 20 2012, 8:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Got back Sat, we did indeed hike the Huntington last Monday.  It took us 6 hours to get to the top of the headwall.  About 4 hours to the top of the fan.  The last 0.3 miles took 2 hours! My 12 y/o was having frequent meltdowns and was just about hysterical from the top of the fan until we got to the top of the  headwall.  My middle son (20) and I were fine, but I was a nervous wreck by the time we got to the top of the headwall, from shadowing my 12 y/o.  It is unlike anything that I have ever hiked previously.  There were spots where a mistake would have tragic consequences!  There were several groups who were technical climbing, not far from the route we ascended.  At the junction of the Alpine Garden, we met a group of French Canadians whose map, and trail knowledge was lacking and they were actually considering going down the Huntington.  I talked them out of it, and they proceeded to tell us of this:

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2012....e-trail

Apparently they came up the Tuck, and wanted a different route down.  Not what you want to do......

But hey, he did it and can feel a sense of accomplishment!
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 28 2012, 6:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I once climbed Tuckermans and descended Huntington, in the mist, near twilight.  Not my best decision.  When I reached the bottom I think I kissed the ground as my legs felt they were about to convulse.  I also ran into a group of French Canadians, also descending.  I had no idea what the trail was like and I needed to get off the mountain due to the weather.  I was in for a very rude surprise.  I went down with them, as another hike was climbing up, with blood streaming from his eye from someone's hiking pole.  Not a good sign.  We inched our way down the slick cliffs and even had to belay packs.  One hiker let go of the rope and a pack (not mine) bounced down the cliff before hanging up in a shrub.  Scary trail.  Definitely do not descend it.   However, I remember the huge boulders at the bottom were very neat.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 29 2012, 6:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Jeff,
I can't believe that you went down that!  Must have taken forever!  Well at least the first few hundred yards anyhow.  I had a chat with a guy who was going up the day we did, and he said he came down it...once, and he described it as "trying to read braile on the rocks"......swore he would never do it again.  I would have high tailed for the Alpine Garden and down the Tuck regardless of the weather......wet rocks would have made it that much worse!
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 11 2012, 8:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's the last time you'll listen to my advice!

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When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be. - Lao Tzu
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 11 2012, 5:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HA!  One never knows the mental state of a 12 year old, not even his father.  In reality, he made it far harder on himself than he needed to.  He had the physical skills, but couldn't convince himslef, nor could his brother or myself, that he could do it with ease.  He was really freaked out, and frightened.  Swears he will never do it again....we'll see about that....its always good to push kids past the point of comfort, so they know what they are capable of.  At least those kids that wouldn't otherwise push themselves.

Much, much more difficult than the King Ravine or the Flume Slide.  Looking back, my son's issues aside, I would most def hike it again, as would my middle son.  It was actually fun, and about the most impressive landscapes I've seen up close.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 12 2012, 9:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Exposure is a weird thing. Walking on a 3-foot wide sidewalk is second nature. But put that same sidewalk on a mountain ridge with 1,000' dropoff on either side and most people couldn't get the courage to stand, let alone walk.

When I find myself in exposed areas, I need to remind myself that the exposure is only an illusion. The only things that matter are the hand/foot holds. That can be difficult for a 12-year-old to comprehend though.


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