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Topic: DIY Quilt Help, Materials suggestions< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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zipposdad Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 6:30 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here are the facts, then the question. I have a mid 70s FrostLine sleeping bag kit. I could biuld it up as a sleeping bag OR use the down and make a quilt with modern fabric. The down is 70s vintage so I know its not 800 fill but I dont see any beaks or feet in it.  I live in GR Michigan so I will need a summer only quilt. I have  40, 45 20 and zero degree bags (all down). What I am wanting to achieve is a sub pound summer (40 degree) quilt.
Pads are BA insulated air core or Thermarest Prolight.

What are suggested outer / liner material and baffle material. I plan to use a toe box design.  Pattern sources are also welcome. Your help is appriciated and how would you make yours differently if you did it over again. hoping for answers


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 7:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A good place to start is www.thru-hiker.com.  If you click on the "projects" tab, there is a link to some instructions for how to make a quilt, with pictures.  If you click on the "materials" tab, under "breathable fabric" you'll find Momentum fabric available by the yard.

There are fabric sources that are less expensive than thru-hiker but not many have their selection of colors for the Pertex/Momentum-like fabrics.  I personally like Quest Outfitters.  Others use Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics, Seattle Fabrics.

Also, check out the GIY gear forum on backpackinglight.com.  Lots of info about making quilts and some cottage companies sell their materials for less than the above companies.

Have fun!


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 7:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used materials from the thru-hiker site.  I bought the quilt kit, but made my own pattern.

At the time, I was able to choose different liner/shell fabrics.  I went with the momentum 90 for the liner and 1.1 dwr ripstop for the shell.  partly because I wanted a bright color for the shell (I got yellow, my wife wanted dark green), partly for cost savings.

The momentum 90 feels super nice against the skin.  I highly recommend it.  The 1.1 dwr ripstop is slippery but is a good fabric, too.  it feels a bit more trash bag-ish so I don't think it'd feel as nice on the skin.

nanoseeum is the best for baffle material.  it will add less weight than standard noseeum.

I made mine completely flexible.  I can lay it flat like a blanket or I can make a toe box for it.  the only changes I'd make if I did it again would be minor, like anchoring the drawcord ends and making wider fabric flaps around the edges to help me pull it tight around myself.  the flaps I made ended up being a little narrower than I wanted, but the quilt still works great.

http://thegpsgeek.com/archives/6

my quilts


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 8:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for your help. Ill post pics when I finish the project

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 03 2012, 9:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would suggest to pick up some Nobul 1 for the liner and Nobul 2 for the outer. These will be some of your lightest shell weight options, but will work great as a quilt shell.  Get it here:

http://www.titaniumgoat.com/Fabric.html

The Nobul material is what was formerly known as the "8D" material. However, in time, it was realized that this was actually a 10D material, however, they kept the name 8D for a while so as not to confuse anyone. Then more recently, the name did change to Nobull. Then even more recent, they got a second material that actually has a bit more coating which makes it slightly more water resistant. They called the regular material Nobul 1 and then the newer material Nobul 2.

This material is very nice against skin. I have a few pieces of kit made form the material when it was called 8D and it is great. It has a softer hand than the M90 and the M50 (new or old versions). I have a quilt made with an M90 shell (inner and outer) and a quilt made with the old M50 (inner and outer). I also have a pair of down booties with the newer M50. I had a quilt with an 8D (Nobul 1) shell, but sold it to buy one slightly longer to fit me better. However, the newer one only has the 8D (Nobul 1) inner and a Impetus 15D water-resistant nylon outer. I have an UQ with a 7D outer and a cuben fiber inner. And I am currently awaiting a pair of down pants from GooseFeet with a Nobul 1 inner and Nobul 2 outer...

Of all of these materials, the 7D is the nicest, IMO, however, it is quite expensive, and hard to get. The 8D (Nobul 1/2) is a close second most comfy, and surprisingly can be the least expensive. The old M50 and the M90 would tie for third. This is hard to judge though because of the different quilt designs. (The M90 is a sewn thru down quilt whereas the M50 has a Climashield Apex inner which is only sewn around the perimeter. This does cause the quilts and materials to feel much, much different.)

Concerning the prices, the Nobul 1 is $1.50 less than the M90, but the Nobul 2 is $1 more, per sqyd. They are both less expensive than the current M50.

Also, what is cool, my M90/down quilt is rated as a 50 F quilt. My M50/Climashield Apex quilt is rated at around a 48 F quilt. The M50/Climashield Apex quilt is both longer and wider (considerably), but it weighs 1.4 oz less than the M90/down quilt...and will keep me warmer (I feel like this is due to the lack of a sewn through design, the wider dimensions and because this material will drape around me because it it now all sewn up...). There are also less trimmings on the M90/down quilt as well. The M50/Climashiled Apex quilt will actually double as a full length UQ if needed... However, much of this weight savings is from the shell... I have a feeling that if I were to use M90 on the Climashield quilt, it would be the same weight, or a fraction of an oz more...

In the end...I take my M50 climashield quilt over the M90 down quilt in the warmer months. I will take my 8D (Nobul 1) and Impetus 15D water-resistant nylon quilt with Climashield Apex for slightly cooler weather...

I am working on a colder weather quilt...of course it will have down though... :)

Hope this helps.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 05 2012, 12:56 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Zippo,
For those high temps, I use a Kelty Lightyear 40 wide opened. I use my Exped7/9 down pad under me and drape the bag as a quilt in a tent.(easy comfort control.... leg in/out).

I too live in GR and my mind is U.P. I too am a quilt user, but for summer here, I use a bag, wide open.....
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 05 2012, 1:00 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Zippo,
For those high temps, I use a Kelty Lightyear 40 wide opened. I use my Exped7/9 down pad under me and drape the bag as a quilt in a tent.(easy comfort control.... leg in/out).

I too live in GR and my mind is U.P. I too am a quilt user, but for summer here, I use a bag, wide open.....
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 05 2012, 9:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used the m50 and climashield to make my underquilt. Came in at a pound and a half with all the hardware, in the stuff sack. Down scares me to work with, but it does compress so much better....

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 05 2012, 9:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(theosus @ Oct. 05 2012, 8:08 pm)
QUOTE
I used the m50 and climashield to make my underquilt. Came in at a pound and a half with all the hardware, in the stuff sack. Down scares me to work with, but it does compress so much better....

it shouldn't scare you to work with it.

a good scale to measure how much you need (and some math skills to calculate those numbers) and a sock over the hose of your vacuum for cleaning up stray tufts of down and you're all set.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 05 2012, 9:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think that the Climashield Apex compresses ok, especially when considering how much (or little) is used in "summer" weight pieces (50 F). Actually, I can't really tell much of a difference at all in my down quilt and my Climashield Apex quilt when it comes to compression (same ratings, but the down quilt is smaller in size). However, the Climashield quilt is lighter, and actually keeps me warmer...

OTOH, my 35 F Climashield Apex quilt will only compress down to around the same size as my 15 F Marmot Helium...


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 08 2012, 6:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

STICK, did you make your own quilt with the APEX? Is it just sewn around the edge? Is the insulation included in the outer seam or is it made kind of like a pillow? (3 edges sewn, stuffing put in, 4th seam sewn) I think Im going to buy a sewing machine this winter. Havent used one since I was in elementary school but I cant afford most of the quilts Ive found for sale.
Also I backpack and camp with two dogs, what fabrics would be most resistant to dog claws? (scratches & punctures)
Thanks


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 08 2012, 8:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rorak @ Oct. 08 2012, 5:57 pm)
QUOTE
STICK, did you make your own quilt with the APEX? Is it just sewn around the edge? Is the insulation included in the outer seam or is it made kind of like a pillow? (3 edges sewn, stuffing put in, 4th seam sewn) I think Im going to buy a sewing machine this winter. Havent used one since I was in elementary school but I cant afford most of the quilts Ive found for sale.
Also I backpack and camp with two dogs, what fabrics would be most resistant to dog claws? (scratches & punctures)
Thanks

rorak,

I did attempt to sew my own quilt, but in the end, it didn't work out quite like I had hoped... So, I got in touch with Tim Marshall and we arranged to send him the materials and he would make the best of it for a predetermined price.

However, the quilt is hemmed all around the edges, catching the Climashield Apex all around the perimeter, and this is all that is needed when using Climashield Apex. No other stitching is needed.

You can check out the quilts here:

http://sticksblog.com/2012/06/20/enlightened-equipment-quilts/

Also, if you don't want to make one of these yourself, you can pick one up from Tim at Enlightened Equipment. He makes a 30 or 40 F Prodigy X that uses Climashield HL and seconds 30D nylon ripstop for $135, or you can get the Prodigy which uses Climashield Apex and you have a few different options on which material you would like, of course these prices will be a little higher and will depend on size... Or, if you wanted down, he even has a Revelation X that is around the same price as the Prodigy and uses 850 down fill and the seconds 30D nylon ripstop...

Anyway...I would suggest the 30D or 1.1 ripstop probably if you have big dogs with big claws.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 09 2012, 9:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks Stick! Im still considering making my own quilt, if it works out theres a lot of other projects I could save $$ doing myself. If you dont mind me asking, where did you run into trouble on yours? I got the impression from your blog that you were more familiar with a sewing machine than me, so you having trouble concerns me a bit.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 09 2012, 10:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just had trouble keeping the material straight and then lined up with the insulation. I will admit, I did drink a few beers while doing this, but to be honest, it was probably my impatience with it that did me in. I did use some double sided tape to try and line up the edges, but it turned out to be a nightmare. If I ever try to do it again, I will take my time to use lots of pins all around the edges, and to just take my time...

I will admit though, I am not the best with a sewing machine... however, I still make efforts. It is actually out right now because I was attempting to sew some 1/8" foam together in the form of cozies for a beer can tumbler...

I would definitely say to give it a try, it is fun, and if it works out, it is definitely a way to save some $$ and truly get customized pieces. For me and this particular project though, I got to a point to where if I kept going I would completely waste the materials, so I sent it to Tim to salvage what he could from it.

I will also admit though, my DIY UQ I did a while back turned out much better. However, the shell materials was not as thin and wispy as the 8D I was using with this quilt, and the insulation seemed to be a bit stiffer than the Climashield Apex...


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 09 2012, 11:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thats reassuring, Ill most likely be using slightly heaver material. Im not sure I would have thought to use anything other than pins while sewing, my mom used to sew a lot.
Thanks again....now to get a sewing machine.


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