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Topic: Change ONE!, Pack decision.< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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TWinAlbany Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 3:12 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, after some research and questions on the internal frame packs, I made a decision to go with one instead of the external I originally planned on. I ordered the Kelty Lakota 65 M/L in Java color. I really like the looks of this one out of all the internal packs that I searched for. Can't wait for Spring to put it through the paces with my 12yr old. :)

I will be spending the winter packing it around with various weights 'til I can build my stamina up to carry about 35/40 pounds. Does that sound about right for weekend/overnighters?
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 3:33 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It depends when and where, but that's an achievable target for a lot of conditions.  It could be harder to reach if you're carrying more than your own gear.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 8:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes, 35 lbs is very achievable for two nights with medium-weight, medium-cost equipment. A 12-year-old should be able to carry a good part of his or her own gear. In fact you could probably get your pack down to 30 lbs with good planning, depending on your willingness to spend money on freeze-dried food.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 11:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I own a Lakota 65, in java, S/M (I have an 18" torso, the lumbar pad placement on the M/L is too low for me - the M/L is too big).  Most recently I used it for a walkabout this summer in northern California, Lassen north - two weeks, no re-supply, 36 pounds total weight (including fly rod, which reduced the food weight, and DLSR with long lense), not including water, hammock/tarp system.

Good pack.  You will have to spend some time "fitting" it, which entails loading and re-loading it, bending the single stay so that it conforms to your body.  Do not omit this step.  The stay will not be damaged by this process.

It is a very good pack for very little money.

40 pounds is a little much for a 65L pack in my view, though I have used my Lakota at that weight (actually 42 pounds) and the pack itself handled it fine.  Wasn't a lot of fun for me, certain of it.  

My base weight fluctuates between 15-20 pounds.  On the trip this summer my base weight was right at 19-1/2 pounds.  I could have left the DLSR (3 pounds) at home and gone with my old Canon A590 but I like making pictures that I can posterize.  

In any case I would recommend that you hold your all-in load to 35 pounds or less, which is easy enough to do given the gear available today.

So yeah, since I can go 2 weeks in this pack and do it at 36 pounds, which was actually a couple of pounds more than it could have been, it should be no big deal for anybody to do shorter trips in this pack with even less weight than that.  

Again, the Lakota will handle 40 pounds without losing the suspension or otherwise beating the crap out of you.  Not fun but it can be done.  I just don't think it necessary to haul that much stuff around in summer, certainly not below 9,000 feet with plenty of water everywhere.

HYOH,

Drake
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 11:22 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It really depends on conditions and needs/wants in regards to reaching a weight goal. With a comfortable pack, I can carry 30-50lbs nearly effortlessly. However, with an ill-fitting pack, 20 lbs can be annoying.

As I have practiced and refined my needs in the wilderness, I have determined what I need and what I can do without and that changes radically depending on the season and conditions. I bring a stool in winter but wouldn't dream of bringing one in winter. I ALWAYS bring my rain shell even if there has been a hot streak for a month. I always bring my down jacket for insulation because I never know when it will drop till freezing at night. The point is...Your starting weight will most likely be much heavier than when the dust settles and you figure out exactly what is important to you.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 12:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the feedback. I realize that I might start off a little heavy 'til I get down to the essentials that I'll need. That's why I'm going to spend plenty of time packing it around before heading into the trails. My son will carry most of his own items with his Kelty Redwing 3100. I'll carry most of the food supplies. They will consist mostly of light weight items such as granola, instant oatmeal for breakfast and MRE's from my military days.

The army taught me how to pack light so, I'm sure I'll get her to a comfortable weight. I don't see us doing more than over night/weekend trips right now anyway. If I do anything longer than that, as I learn, I'm sure I can get by fine with this pack.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 12:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And your son will do very well with the Redwing, another excellent pack.  I also own the 2650, a smaller version of the 3100.

Good choices.  Very practical.  Rational decisions.

Have a great time in the woods.

HYOH

Drake
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 12:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Drake, do you load most of your gear in stuff sacks to fit better in the internal frame pack? I was reading on loading techniques for this type of pack and it recommends stuff sacks for organizational issues. Also, does this help figure out the placement of stuff for weight issues?
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 1:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A 12 year old should be able to carry all of their own gear and food. And should.

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Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe. - Thomas Sowell
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 4:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TWinAlbany @ Oct. 06 2012, 9:59 am)
QUOTE
Drake, do you load most of your gear in stuff sacks to fit better in the internal frame pack? I was reading on loading techniques for this type of pack and it recommends stuff sacks for organizational issues. Also, does this help figure out the placement of stuff for weight issues?

I do use stuffsacks.  I know that there are those who argue against the use of sacks on the basis of limiting pack weight and that argument does have some merit but I have a packing system that works better if I don't just toss stuff in the bag.

Weight placement is central to that system and the stuff sack sizes are optimized for placement into the pack in specific places.  I typically do not use sacks for the soft goods like socks, down vest and so forth that can be better utilized for filling the spaces between the sacks or to keep one or more sacks off of the pack wall.  This is all about just being practical, and being able to optimally load and unload my pack without re-inventing the process every single time.  It also helps me ensure that I haven't left anything in camp when it comes time to push off in the morning.  I know what is supposed to be in the sack.  The sack goes into the pack when it has been checked.  It's a routine that I have found helpful over the years.

I've been doing it this way for so long that I am pretty sure I could load my pack deep inside a lava tube, and that is a very, very dark place.

It's all in how you want to roll.  I want to roll as efficiently as possible and stuff sacks help me do just that.

HYOH

Drake
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 7:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm liking the usage of sacks for just the reasons you outlined. Will need to pick up a set in various sizes. Thanks again for the info and thoughts.

My 12yr old will be carrying all of his own equipment with the exception of the main food items. I'll get some stuff sacks for him also and work on getting him used to a system of packing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 06 2012, 10:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I put all clothing in waterproof stuff sacks.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 07 2012, 9:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Oct. 06 2012, 7:51 pm)
QUOTE
I put all clothing in waterproof stuff sacks.

I actually put my clothes into small, black 4 mil bags, just wrap 'em up.  And like most folks I also use a contractor bag inside the pack.  Plastic bags are the hiker's best friend, right?

Absolutely true.

HYOH

Drake
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12 replies since Oct. 06 2012, 3:12 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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