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Topic: Why so clammy at night?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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Dabrador Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 10:23 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I can't figure this out. Just returned from a great 3 day trip with what I thought would be the solution to clammy nights in my tent.

Here's my setup...REI Chrysalis tent, Marmot Pinnacle bag, Exped Synmat 7 pad and my newest item - Cocoon CoolMax Liner.

No matter what I did, I was clammy the whole night. Temperatures were in the high 30's/low 40's. Humidity was about 50-60%. The tent was well ventilated, no condensation at all.

In addition, I made sure I cleaned up before going to sleep. One night, I slept in the liner and bag. Another night, I used the bag as a blanket and slept in the liner on top of the pad.

No matter what I did, I felt clammy at night. Any thoughts on this? Is it gear related? Is the nylon of the bag and/or the CoolMax of the liner not conducive to breathability? Is it a lack of airflow in the tent?

Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 10:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Based on your description, it sure sounds like your new liner. Did you try removing it from your sleeping bag and just sleeping in your sleeping bag?
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 10:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(vinovampire @ Nov. 12 2012, 10:34 am)
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Based on your description, it sure sounds like your new liner. Did you try removing it from your sleeping bag and just sleeping in your sleeping bag?

I know it's not the liner because it was the same when I was using just the bag. I bought the liner thinking that would solve the problem, but it didn't.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 11:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When you say "clammy", were you cold?  Or hot/sweaty?  What kind of clothes were you wearing?

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 11:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Too warm of a bag in my opinion. A 15 F bag in temps 25 degrees warmer is just asking to sweat.

Oh yeah, plus those liners add a good 20 degrees more, you know... ;-) (j/k)


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 12:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Wasn't cold at all...just felt kinda sticky. I didn't buy the liner for added warmth (don't believe that hype!). I thought it would create a more comfortable feel when sleeping.

Now that I think about it, Ray's probably right. I sleep warm and as a result, the bag created a too warm environment thus resulting in the clammy feel.

That now brings up another question...is it even possible to use one sleeping bag across a wide temp range? What do you use when the temps vary?
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 12:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Dabrador @ Nov. 12 2012, 11:28 am)
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That now brings up another question...is it even possible to use one sleeping bag across a wide temp range? What do you use when the temps vary?

In a word, no, it's not. But it's easier to adjust to different temps with a lighter bag than with a heavier one--you can always put on more layers of clothing during the night if you are cold.

Most good 30--degree bags would keep a warm sleeper comfortable down to around 35ish. Then start layering up if it gets colder than that.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 12:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am a warm sleeper.  I use a 40* bag down to 30* when necessary, sometimes needing to add a base layer as I usually sleep in shorts and a T.  I have a 15* bag for any chances that it gets lower than that.  I have not used the 15* bag since a trip to the Tetons, and I didn't sleep in it that trip, but loaned it to the couple I was hiking with.  We woke up to light ice in our water bottles one morning, and I had slept comfortably in my 40* bag with a medium base layer.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 12:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It looks like the liner is going back and a new sleeping bag is on it's way.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 2:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In that temp range I would have been using the bag as a blanket (at best) and not gone near the liner.

Clammy = not getting ventilation and being inside the liner under the bag==== clammy.

Lack of airflow in the liner so the humidity next to your skin builds up and the surface moisture from normal perspiration builds on the skin rather than evaporating>>> clammy.

There's times all that's "under" my bag are my legs to widen my sleep system so my low elevation start is adaptable to my high elevation route's needs. Sometimes about all that's covered are my knees with my not being bothered as long as my shelter or it's location  keeps the breeze in check.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 12 2012, 9:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Full length, silkweight unders stop that.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 13 2012, 8:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Using my 30 down bag (15 according to REI, but it's not EN rated) this fall I wke up sweating when temps were humid in the 50s (raining out). To the point where my bag was wet in places. In general, the bag felt very clammy. But I know it was the mix of high humidity and it was just plain too warm.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 14 2012, 7:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a sleeping bag liner I use with my bag. The bag is a 20degree cat's meow. The liner was a $12 texsport fleece "sleeping bag" that's really just a thin liner with a zipper. I cut the zipper off and  made it into a mummy shape to cut down the bulk and weight. I sewed the bottom third into a tube for my feet. In warmer weather I just lay in the bag with it open, with the fleece on top. I laid "in" the bag down to around 45, with the bag open, and the sheet partially covering me. I'm going to test it outside this winter, but with my bag, liner, and underquilt I think I'll be okay to 20 before I start getting cool. In warmer temps I can drop the underquilt and be good, even laying in that bag.

I like the fleece "feel" a lot better than the feel of sleeping bag fabric. Ooh - I just thought of something, I have an old modal fiber sheet at home, it would make an awesome thin liner/ top sheet instead...


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 14 2012, 9:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Nov. 12 2012, 11:32 am)
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Too warm of a bag in my opinion. A 15 F bag in temps 25 degrees warmer is just asking to sweat.

I'll go partway along with that.  I use that bag for everything, but unless it's cold, I rarely zip it up or even spread it like a quilt.

However, I do agree that clamminess usually indicates sweating, usually from being too warm.
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