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Topic: So: about to be new to SLR digital photography, Tips? Tricks? Suggestions?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 2:07 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

(other than I should post on a photography forum....).

:)

Getting an FX body for my Nikon lens collection, my F5 is officially being retired. Went this summer for 17 days in Yosemite with just my ELPH and while I like the little thing it's compromises bugged me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 4:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey HSF

Welcome.

What camera are you looking at? The D600? (read about dust problems - mine's headed to Nikon this week). If it were me, I'd wait for another option .. like a D700 upgrade (I don't think of the D800 as a D700 line at all). But if you mainly shoot landscapes, the D600 would be great. It's not a wildlife camera at all.

Whatcha askin' specifically?

Software?

Cameras?

To me, the biggest shift from film to digital is in file management. Developing a good system for naming images, keywording, backing up, etc, is a task unto itself. Once done, life is MUCH better.

Why FX? For backpacking stuff, I think a good case can be made for DX models. As it can, I spose, for mirrorless, and even non-slr bodies as well. That said, as mentioned, the D600 is about as small and handy as a camera need be.

Next step, imo, is learning software.

For bp-ing trips, I always bring (at least) 2 batteries, and tons of memory cards; which, on the D600, I DON'T like SD cards .. they get lost too easily. The D700 uses a CF card.

A 12mp slr is more than enough.

I use Capture NX2 for raw conversions, then Photioshop cs4. I downloaded a trial version of Lightroom 4 last night, so I'l play with that over the next month. I tried the first version, years ago, and didnt' care for it. I have Apple Aperture, but don't use it much at all - too much of a learning curve.

Photo Mechanic is a GREAT program for editing, browsing, keywording, etc, if you need it .. www.camerabits.com ... on a Mac, it's the ticket.

Shooting .. always, always, always go with the RGB histogram .. not the luminosity one, which is (essentially) an average of the 3. For accurate info on exposure, you need to view the 3 RGB histograms.

Other than that .. keep you iso as low as possible, but the newer bodies are so good.

More and more folks aren't using Photoshop for much of anything, just a program like Lightroom is all. So if you don't have P/S, you might look at that route.

What are you doing with your photos? Website? Prints? Flickr? Trash can? Ironically, today we have cameras like the D800 putting out images that can print 30x40 with ease, and we're viewing the pics on ipads and iphones, maybe 5 inches wide. Talk about crazy.

Cheers

Carl


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"What good is a used up world and how can it be worth having?" -- Sting, All This Time.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 4:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oh man, this can get r-e-a-l-l-y  e-x-p-e-n-s-i-v-e!... if you let it!  :D

But for me, I would approach it the same way I approached backpacking.  Before buying any one piece, read up on the stuff, determine what kind of photography you are mostly interested in -- read the reviews -- ask lots of questions -- and buy with an eye on both the individual pieces themselves AND how well they will work together as a system.  And for me anyway, once I am ready to buy, I will also look into buying refurbished or second hand from reputable sellers.

I used to be crazy about SLR's -- started with Konica T and eventually moved on to Canon A1 with a couple different lenses.  But "simplicity and lightweight" caught up with me -- and now, my camera is a balance of small/light and some degree of photographic control -- but nothing like the weight or versatility of a full-on SLR system.


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The world is a book and those who do not travel read only a page.  -- St. Augustine
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 5:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Walkinman- Nothing specific other than the backpacking context rather than indoors.

Interesting point about the CF card.

The D800, FX so all my lenses will work exactly as always.. Being an old style slide Kodachrome person I like BIG, so they'll be viewed on todays version of the projector screen (or matte painted flat wall for the really big look, best part about that place): flat panel TV (hooked into a Mac) and/or an LCD projector (though my phone and pad will get their sets as well).

Ya, batteries are the thing on these, given the price of the add-on grip extra batteries make a lot more sense (and out and about I find I prefer the optical viewfinder so the back display won't be on draining the battery in "live view". tho I'd always liked the compatibility with my F taking AAA's in it's drive grip. I've Aperture for work, I'm used to it's organizational quirks, still goto Photoshop for the heavy lifting adjustments, which hopefully will be minimal once I get the hang of the new body. For less heavy lifting Lightroom may just be the thing (being used to the Adobe jargon). I'll keep Photo Mechanic in mind as well, As my Boxes and file cabinets of slides attest, once you lose control of the inventory you get buried...

Ben: :) It got really expensive a couple decades ago, hence my large set of Nikon lenses both prime and zooms (the only one of which I expect I'll be losing is the 500 mM mirror, too bad with the newer sensors that would have made a fun bird lens!). Now with no film/developing  expenses it's actually going to get cheaper! Well, except for whatever I print out on my large format Epson 2200. 13 x 19 is likely to eat a lotta ink.

Thanks!
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 5:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey HSF

To be honest, I really don't see the need for the D800 resolution. It simply eats up HD space, card space, and bogs a computer down. Something like the D4 is more than enough; hence a desire for the "D700 upgrade" such as - the D3:D700 would be nice to have a D4:D700upgrade). For any digital display, there's simply no need for 36 mp, imo.

I use the battery grips for all my cameras that have them, but I generally remove them for backpacking and just take the smaller EL3 or equivalent. I didn't get a grip for the D600, as it doesn't offer an option for the larger EL4 style battery.

The back display is for histograms only, for me. Live view can be great for fine tuning focus, though. Zoom in it and make sure it's sharp where it needs to be sharp. Even the best AF systems can be corrected. Especially helpful at night (either in Live View or psot-shutter review) for checking sharpness.

From what I understand, Lightroom does virtually all the heavy lifting that PS does. Some of my friends who shoot stock for a living don't use PS at all any more.

If you don't use a cataloging thing like LR, Photo Mechanic is even more awesome.

For printing, I don't print at home any more at all - it's way cheaper to send the file to a lab; less hassle, and a better finished product.

I pulled an SD card out of the camera last week, at night. Miinus 38 degrees, so with gloves on; the card slipped straight outta my hand and into the snow. Do you have any idea how hard it is to find something that small in a foot of powder? At night? With gloves on? And that was with me being ultra-careful, as I've been well aware how easily those little suckers disappear for a few years now. I hate the damn things. A 32gb card has a LOT of photos on it.

For backpacking, I think the D600 is a much better choice than the 800; I'm not sure if the 800 takes CF or SD cards. The D600 is so small and light.

For the D800, primes are the ticket, as it outresolves even the best 2.8 zooms. Get yourself a couple Zeiss 21mm and 25mm primes, the Nikon 28f/1.8 and 35mm f/1.4 primes and a 50mm. Oh, and the 14-24mm is AWESOME.

RAW, Auto WB, Adobe RGB, and a few other settings I'd have to go review if you want any info on that end.

Cheers

Carl


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"What good is a used up world and how can it be worth having?" -- Sting, All This Time.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 6:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lightroom is to CPU what Photoshop is to memory - a hog.  But it's basically non-desctructive, which is good.  Overall I like Lightroom better, but still pull out Photoshop once in a while.  If you have a lot of images that you want to process roughly the same the presets in Lightroom can help save a lot of time (I hate slaving over the computer).  Adobe has some pretty decent LR video tutorials on their site.

In good light the smaller sensors perform well.  It's in low light that they can suffer, especially at higher shutter speeds (higher ISO).

I saw an F5 in good condition offered for about a hundred bucks a couple of months ago.  :(

I'm still hanging onto my D700, but don't use it much unless I want a lighter weight camera or a second body.

Things like autoISO (I use it a lot when shooting sports) and autoWB are quite good on the newer Nikons, but it's nice to take my time and determine the exposure I want when I can (usually only on dayhikes or multiweek trips).  I have to stop and think about reciprocity failure now, whereas it used to be almost automatic.  :(

One problem with the digital era is depreciation.  The cameras drop like stones as soon as the next model comes out.  Lenses used to hold their value, but even they depreciate rapidly these days.  Fortunately, I don't see a whole lot of either in my future, but I do need to unload some old stuff.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 11 2012, 7:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Neither the body nor the majority of my lenses are specifically for backpacking (probably less than 10% of my shooting), though I've always used whichever camera body (two back an F3 then an F5) I had for everything, just swapping off my lens selection. I also have tended to keep them forever. Yeah $100 to $125 for a 5 says about it all.... though I can't complain as I used mine from probably 97 onward to just recently.

Hey it's newer than my car!
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 2:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(reubenstump @ Dec. 11 2012, 2:02 pm)
QUOTE
Things like autoISO (I use it a lot when shooting sports) and autoWB are quite good on the newer Nikons, but it's nice to take my time and determine the exposure I want when I can (usually only on dayhikes or multiweek trips).  I have to stop and think about reciprocity failure now, whereas it used to be almost automatic.  :(

Almost everything you wrote is right on .. but autoISO doesn't really interfere with exposure, no? I can shoot on manual exposure with auto ISO, for example. AutoWB certainly has little to do with exposure.

I shoot virtually everything on manual exposure; even to a fault, where I SHOULD use aperture priority (fast moving wildlife, like birds, I think it makes more sense).

Determining exposure today means hazarding a guess, and checking the RGB histogram; I'll spot meter something, place it in a zone (neutral, +1, +1&1/2, +2, -1, -2, etc, shoot, and check my histogram. To shoot without checking a histogram makes no sense.

Why would you worry about reciprocity failure with a digital capture?

The smaller sensors are still way, way, WAY beyond film at higher ISOs. ISO 1000, on my D300s. Accidentally, of course. I should've been shooting the D700. The high res file, is can send it if you want to see, is amazing for a DX capture at that ISO. If they'd upgrade THAT body, I'd be stoked.

+1 on the depreciation. I'd love a D4, but I can't see buying another body in that price range (I started with the D2x) again; Even 4-5 years later, a $5k camera becomes worth maybe $400-600.00. Which is ridiculous.

What do you shoot other than the D700? I love that camera; for the price range, it's fantastic.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 6:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

AutoISO juggles the exposure values in order to get an acceptable end result.  You can get the same exposure many different ways.  Since I shoot a fair amount of sports at night it's nice to set the aperture wide open, a minimum shutter speed, and let the ISO float.   AutoISO essentially allows you to fix 1 or 2 legs of the three legged stool and let the other adjust as needed.

AutoWB is good in mixed light, or say if you're a wedding photographer going in and out of the church.  Or if you're taking family snapshots at Christmas and one room has fluorescent, one room has incandescent, one has a lot of windows, etc.  Or if the end of the world is happening and the fireballs, asteroids, supernovas, white dwarfs, etc., all explode at once.   :p  Of course, you could strobe the event...

For things I care about I use aperture priority or manual.

Yeah, spot metering helps determine an accurate exposure.  I mean, that's the whole reason for it.  The problem is if I have my camera on a tripod, the light changes, and I want to meter again, and I can't meter the same spot.  That's when a real meter (which I own but rarely use), comes in handy.  Otherwise it's just a matter of tweaking the manual values to get a histogram with the desired exposure.  "Crap, here come the clouds.  OK, looks like I'll need about 2/3 of a stop longer shutter speed..."

Reciprocity still happens, right?  Digital or film.  I haven't had to use it in, well, years, but I remember using it with digital.  A 1 or 2 minute exposure is still 1 or 2 minutes.

I have a D4 (skipped the D3s), largely for the low noise at high ISO (night sports), and general awesomeness (not really interested in video).  The D700 is my second camera, but it's also great.  Not to mention smaller, lighter, and cheaper.  :)

DX is great for wildlife, with the apparent extend reach.

I'm not an expert on the super technical details, but allegedly some of the higher resolution cameras are beginning to out resolve some of the older lenses, which are then redesigned with higher/better MTF numbers.  Plus it gives the manufacturers another reason to make us think we need to buy new equipment.  :D
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 8:59 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I started my career with a Canon 20D. I cant believe that six years later, iPhones have the same amount of megapixels as my first DSLR!
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 9:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You may want to consider buying used.  There are so many photographers who must have "the latest thing".  There are a lot of great used camera bodies out there.

Like others here, I shoot mainly in aperture priority or shutter priority.  I sometimes carry the camera in Program only to grab quick shots.

The biggest learning curve for me was learning that capturing the image is only half the job.  Using to use Photoshop or Lightroom can really add a lot to your photos.  Also, don't be reluctant to learn about shooting in RAW.  It gives you much more freedom to manipulate the images.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 10:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ataylor @ Dec. 12 2012, 9:53 am)
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You may want to consider buying used.  There are so many photographers who must have "the latest thing".  There are a lot of great used camera bodies out there.

Like others here, I shoot mainly in aperture priority or shutter priority.  I sometimes carry the camera in Program only to grab quick shots.

The biggest learning curve for me was learning that capturing the image is only half the job.  Using to use Photoshop or Lightroom can really add a lot to your photos.  Also, don't be reluctant to learn about shooting in RAW.  It gives you much more freedom to manipulate the images.

I might be selling a Canon 50D, lightly used and well cared for. If anyones interested PM me with an offer.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 2:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(reubenstump @ Dec. 12 2012, 2:16 am)
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AutoISO juggles the exposure values in order to get an acceptable end result.  You can get the same exposure many different ways.  Since I shoot a fair amount of sports at night it's nice to set the aperture wide open, a minimum shutter speed, and let the ISO float.   AutoISO essentially allows you to fix 1 or 2 legs of the three legged stool and let the other adjust as needed.

AutoWB is good in mixed light, or say if you're a wedding photographer going in and out of the church.  Or if you're taking family snapshots at Christmas and one room has fluorescent, one room has incandescent, one has a lot of windows, etc.  Or if the end of the world is happening and the fireballs, asteroids, supernovas, white dwarfs, etc., all explode at once.   :p  Of course, you could strobe the event...

For things I care about I use aperture priority or manual.

Yeah, spot metering helps determine an accurate exposure.  I mean, that's the whole reason for it.  The problem is if I have my camera on a tripod, the light changes, and I want to meter again, and I can't meter the same spot.  That's when a real meter (which I own but rarely use), comes in handy.  Otherwise it's just a matter of tweaking the manual values to get a histogram with the desired exposure.  "Crap, here come the clouds.  OK, looks like I'll need about 2/3 of a stop longer shutter speed..."

Reciprocity still happens, right?  Digital or film.  I haven't had to use it in, well, years, but I remember using it with digital.  A 1 or 2 minute exposure is still 1 or 2 minutes.

I have a D4 (skipped the D3s), largely for the low noise at high ISO (night sports), and general awesomeness (not really interested in video).  The D700 is my second camera, but it's also great.  Not to mention smaller, lighter, and cheaper.  :)

DX is great for wildlife, with the apparent extend reach.

I'm not an expert on the super technical details, but allegedly some of the higher resolution cameras are beginning to out resolve some of the older lenses, which are then redesigned with higher/better MTF numbers.  Plus it gives the manufacturers another reason to make us think we need to buy new equipment.  :D

You're right on autoISO.

Auto web is fine anywhere, IMO. And in shooting RAW it's virtually irrelevant, as it is easily changed in a RAW converter.

You mean a separate spot meter? An incident meter isn't so great for landscape work, IMO, unless you're standing in the same light as the subject, and then it, or any external meter, doesn't factor in for filters. Wy pay thousands for this amazing camera and then use an external meter?

For changing light, use the back focus button, recompose, etc. also, another reason to ALWAYS check the histograms. :)

Cheers

Carl


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 2:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(gregpphoto @ Dec. 12 2012, 5:59 am)
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I started my career with a Canon 20D. I cant believe that six years later, iPhones have the same amount of megapixels as my first DSLR!

Yes but with a far smaller sensor area the phone sensor has low light issues your Canon won't due to the far smaller pixel elements. Everything else being equal.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 3:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HSF, if you are coming from an SLR, your choice if very good. Your lens collection will act the same. Just use the glass you have. I also like to look though the optical glass to compose. ISO ought to be awesome on your new camera. I can shoot at 800 ISO on my old Canon 20D with no problem, a camera that has held up in quality for 8 years now. Exposure is key here. If you underexpose at high ISO, that is bad for ugly noise. Learn the histogram. It is your light meter now. You can see where the tones are and can adjust from there. I like shooting manual and set everything the way I want it. Your new camera should have amazing high ISO capabilities.


I do agree with WM, 12 mp is quite enough. I’m still using 8 and when I do have to change I will have to upgrade my computer to handle all the big files.


If you already have Photoshop, that will do perfectly. It has the ability to do any kind of micro contrast work you will ever need as well as much more. There is really no need to spend more money on software right now. You don’t need the best of everything or someone’s pet toy to make a good image. You already know that and you have what it takes with your eye and understanding of light.

You are going to have fun. That is some very good equipment. We can help you with the learning curve as you go, but you will pick that up fast.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 3:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Arizona- Thanks, "a camera that has held up in quality for 8 years now" yes, that's why I tend to buy a bit "up", as I may have mentioned my F5 has given be great service since 97, at fifteen years it doesn't owe me a thing and while I don't abuse equipment neither do I baby it (never use a case until I'm heading home and sometimes even not then for those roadside grab shots, though truth be told I am a tad less likely to hang one off my chest with an 80-200 when cross country skiing anymore....) so the extra seals on this new one has appeal.

As to resolution and file size: output demands and possibilities only grow (the new 4K televisions) so having the largest amount of information stored has an appeal for me and storage keeps dropping in cost, terabyte drives are priced below what I paid for mediocre megabyte ones.. OK now I feel old. :)
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 3:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Arizona @ Dec. 12 2012, 11:11 am)
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HSF, if you are coming from an SLR, your choice if very good. Your lens collection will act the same. Just use the glass you have. I also like to look though the optical glass to compose. ISO ought to be awesome on your new camera. I can shoot at 800 ISO on my old Canon 20D with no problem, a camera that has held up in quality for 8 years now. Exposure is key here. If you underexpose at high ISO, that is bad for ugly noise. Learn the histogram. It is your light meter now. You can see where the tones are and can adjust from there. I like shooting manual and set everything the way I want it. Your new camera should have amazing high ISO capabilities.


I do agree with WM, 12 mp is quite enough. I’m still using 8 and when I do have to change I will have to upgrade my computer to handle all the big files.


If you already have Photoshop, that will do perfectly. It has the ability to do any kind of micro contrast work you will ever need as well as much more. There is really no need to spend more money on software right now. You don’t need the best of everything or someone’s pet toy to make a good image. You already know that and you have what it takes with your eye and understanding of light.

You are going to have fun. That is some very good equipment. We can help you with the learning curve as you go, but you will pick that up fast.

One thing of note about photoshop. They seem to be pushing towards a cloud based service, which gets WAY more costly. They've already offered upgrades that ONLY come via the cloud based service. Currently, Lightroom doesn't do that. And with the draconian new " no upgrades for more than one version" policy (such as no upgrading from CS3 to CS6) photoshop might not be a cheaper route.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 6:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Walkinman @ Dec. 12 2012, 8:55 am)
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(Arizona @ Dec. 12 2012, 11:11 am)
QUOTE
HSF, if you are coming from an SLR, your choice if very good. Your lens collection will act the same. Just use the glass you have. I also like to look though the optical glass to compose. ISO ought to be awesome on your new camera. I can shoot at 800 ISO on my old Canon 20D with no problem, a camera that has held up in quality for 8 years now. Exposure is key here. If you underexpose at high ISO, that is bad for ugly noise. Learn the histogram. It is your light meter now. You can see where the tones are and can adjust from there. I like shooting manual and set everything the way I want it. Your new camera should have amazing high ISO capabilities.


I do agree with WM, 12 mp is quite enough. I’m still using 8 and when I do have to change I will have to upgrade my computer to handle all the big files.


If you already have Photoshop, that will do perfectly. It has the ability to do any kind of micro contrast work you will ever need as well as much more. There is really no need to spend more money on software right now. You don’t need the best of everything or someone’s pet toy to make a good image. You already know that and you have what it takes with your eye and understanding of light.

You are going to have fun. That is some very good equipment. We can help you with the learning curve as you go, but you will pick that up fast.

One thing of note about photoshop. They seem to be pushing towards a cloud based service, which gets WAY more costly. They've already offered upgrades that ONLY come via the cloud based service. Currently, Lightroom doesn't do that. And with the draconian new " no upgrades for more than one version" policy (such as no upgrading from CS3 to CS6) photoshop might not be a cheaper route.

That has me a bit worried too. I don't update every time they come out with some new stuff I will never use and now they do charge full price if you skip an upgrade. The only reason would be that it would not work on some future operating system. I won't pay the exorbitant fee anymore. I was wondering if Photoshop Elements has enough. It seems to be very reasonable. I see they have Layers now. We'll see how long PS CS5 works on the future operating systems. It ought to do for a good while.

I started on Version 5 or 6 a long time ago so that's how I got hooked into the cycle. CS5 is something like version 10 or close to that. They used to let you skip upgrades but not now all of a sudden.

The biggest reason to use it is, if you already have it. There are other viable options for first time buyers now. I want Layers at the least and Lightroom did not have it when I gave it a try in the very beginning. Like everyone I developed a certain work flow and mine is built around Photoshop. That may have to eventually change.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 7:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Agreed - once you get a workflow down, it's a real pita in the throw it away and learn a new one .. for me, anyway.

Friends who've taken the time to learn Lightroom say they can do pretty much everything they need to do using it, and rarely open PS any more. And with raw files, layers aren't quite as critical, as the edits are non-destructive. Even using NX 2, I get 90% done, most of the time, before moving a tif to PS.

And, if you use Lightroom, from what I understand, you can skip the whole 'save a tif' process, and just save your raw file, and resized jpegs for the web.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 7:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Walkinman @ Dec. 12 2012, 2:05 pm)
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(reubenstump @ Dec. 12 2012, 2:16 am)
QUOTE
AutoISO juggles the exposure values in order to get an acceptable end result.  You can get the same exposure many different ways.  Since I shoot a fair amount of sports at night it's nice to set the aperture wide open, a minimum shutter speed, and let the ISO float.   AutoISO essentially allows you to fix 1 or 2 legs of the three legged stool and let the other adjust as needed.

AutoWB is good in mixed light, or say if you're a wedding photographer going in and out of the church.  Or if you're taking family snapshots at Christmas and one room has fluorescent, one room has incandescent, one has a lot of windows, etc.  Or if the end of the world is happening and the fireballs, asteroids, supernovas, white dwarfs, etc., all explode at once.   :p  Of course, you could strobe the event...

For things I care about I use aperture priority or manual.

Yeah, spot metering helps determine an accurate exposure.  I mean, that's the whole reason for it.  The problem is if I have my camera on a tripod, the light changes, and I want to meter again, and I can't meter the same spot.  That's when a real meter (which I own but rarely use), comes in handy.  Otherwise it's just a matter of tweaking the manual values to get a histogram with the desired exposure.  "Crap, here come the clouds.  OK, looks like I'll need about 2/3 of a stop longer shutter speed..."

Reciprocity still happens, right?  Digital or film.  I haven't had to use it in, well, years, but I remember using it with digital.  A 1 or 2 minute exposure is still 1 or 2 minutes.

I have a D4 (skipped the D3s), largely for the low noise at high ISO (night sports), and general awesomeness (not really interested in video).  The D700 is my second camera, but it's also great.  Not to mention smaller, lighter, and cheaper.  :)

DX is great for wildlife, with the apparent extend reach.

I'm not an expert on the super technical details, but allegedly some of the higher resolution cameras are beginning to out resolve some of the older lenses, which are then redesigned with higher/better MTF numbers.  Plus it gives the manufacturers another reason to make us think we need to buy new equipment.  :D

You're right on autoISO.

Auto web is fine anywhere, IMO. And in shooting RAW it's virtually irrelevant, as it is easily changed in a RAW converter.

You mean a separate spot meter? An incident meter isn't so great for landscape work, IMO, unless you're standing in the same light as the subject, and then it, or any external meter, doesn't factor in for filters. Wy pay thousands for this amazing camera and then use an external meter?

For changing light, use the back focus button, recompose, etc. also, another reason to ALWAYS check the histograms. :)

Cheers

Carl

Auto web?

Spot meter.

Back focus button?
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 8:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

AutoWB sorry .... Still getting used to this iPad thing.

I use the back focus button now all the time, and the shutter release never fora focusing.

IMO, a separate spot meter is a complete waste of time w/ modern cameras. Even the later film cameras come with a GREAT spot meter. I'll sometimes use an incident meter, just for kicks. But there's certainly dozens of ways to skin that cat. :)

Cheers

Carl


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 8:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Having Photoshop I really didn't see a need for Lightroom.  But I tried LR3 for kicks and have been very impressed.  I'm using LR4 now and barely touch PS.  The file management and the fact that it's geared specifically for photographers is what makes it simpler IMO.  Short of lifting my face and putting it on Dave Beckham's body or making a Christmas card I don't really use PS at all.  

When I was in the market for FX, the whopping 36mp of the D800 is what steered me towards the more attractive 24mp D600.  I personally don't need that much resolution and didn't want it bogging down my write speeds.  I don't mind using SD cards and pretty much prefer it since I can use them in my GoPro, P&S and MacBook Pro.  Incidentally that was a head scratcher for me and the D800... they use 2 slots but one is CF and one is SD???  I guess there's a need but I can't think of a reason.

Now, had I known about the dust problems then I would have waited like WM said for either another FX upgrade or maybe for Nikon to correct the issue.  But as it is about 5,000 actuations into my D600 and I'm not really seeing an issue with dust.  Are there some specs?  Yes I see about 3-5 under a sensor loupe.  Do they blow off with a Rocket Blaster?  No not for me unfortunately, but at least the dust isn't multiplying like most have reported.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 8:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Walkinman -

Autoweb/iPad - <guffaw>

Back focus button?

Agree that the internal spot meters are great, but if your camera's locked in a position in which you can't use the spot meter over the desired point when the light changes...  Not saying that I don't check the histogram also, but...
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 12 2012, 9:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(reubenstump @ Dec. 12 2012, 4:54 pm)
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Walkinman -

Autoweb/iPad -

Back focus button?

Agree that the internal spot meters are great, but if your camera's locked in a position in which you can't use the spot meter over the desired point when the light changes...  Not saying that I don't check the histogram also, but...

Hey Reuben

You can use the AE lock button as a focus button, focusing with the thumb. Definitely the way to go.

You can always move the camera, meter, and recompose and shoot. Or, just meter on something different. I's pretty rare that you can't find at least done of the focus points to meter on whatever you want ..... esp on the D4.

And for backpacking, bringing another meter is a waste of weight. But, I know folks who do that. So whatever works, I guess.

Cheers

Carl


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2012, 7:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ah, yeah, do it all the time.  You can set the button to do various things, somewhere in the depths of the googlejillion menus.  Just never heard of referred to as the back focus button before.  The problem is that if I have the composition exactly like I want it then the move and recompose steps mean tweaking the composition again.

Adams use a light meter, as did/do the Westons and many others, so it can't be all bad...   :;):
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2012, 9:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(reubenstump @ Dec. 13 2012, 3:30 pm)
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Ah, yeah, do it all the time.  You can set the button to do various things, somewhere in the depths of the googlejillion menus.  Just never heard of referred to as the back focus button before.  The problem is that if I have the composition exactly like I want it then the move and recompose steps mean tweaking the composition again.

Talk about first world problems. :)


QUOTE
Adams use a light meter, as did/do the Westons and many others, so it can't be all bad...   :;):

Ha ha ..... Sure ... But they didn't shoot a $6000.00 camera with a built in spot meter using the most advanced technology available, eh? :) Did their LF setup have an RGB histogram? :)

Cheers

Carl


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 13 2012, 9:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Walkinman @ Dec. 13 2012, 9:25 pm)
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QUOTE
Adams use a light meter, as did/do the Westons and many others, so it can't be all bad...   :;):

Ha ha ..... Sure ... But they didn't shoot a $6000.00 camera with a built in spot meter using the most advanced technology available, eh? :) Did their LF setup have an RGB histogram? :)

Cheers

Carl

No, they didn't shoot with a 6k camera with a builtin spot meter, but they used some of the most advanced technology of the day.  I doubt that it was possible to get into the f/64 club with a soft lens.  Not to mention there were just a whole lot better than I am.  And spent a gajillion hours dodging and burning.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2012, 1:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oh, I agree .. my point is that modern digital cameras utilize some amazing technology; there's no real need to carry a spot meter that then doesn't meter thru your filters, etc.  Those guys used an external meter because their camera had no meter.

Why pay all that money for the technology in the camera then use an external meter? That's like buying the greatest and latest AF motors and cameras and lenses and shooting manual focus the whole time. Sure, I can manual focus pretty well; I actually use to practice shooting soccer games and traffic, regularly. But why do it when I'm shooting a 300mm AF-S f2.8 lens on a D4?


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2012, 1:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HSF - $200.00 off the D800 at bhphoto.

And a deal on the D600, too.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 14 2012, 2:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Walkinman @ Dec. 14 2012, 10:52 am)
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HSF - $200.00 off the D800 at bhphoto.

And a deal on the D600, too.

Thanks! Mine arrived this morning from an order placed Wednesday so I contacted customer service to see what they can do. Other than the addition of the remote (nice for tripod work) nothing leapt out but the price cut at least would be nice. We'll see. They'll probably be aware of their 30 day return policy so....
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