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Topic: Do you carry an emergency shelter?, Dayhikes. If so what?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 1:50 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just curious what everyone packs with them on those more dangerous hikes. Anyone carry an emergency shelter in case things go wrong?
What do you use?
I usually just bring an emergency blanket and fashion something from that, but I'm curious as the alternatives.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 2:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I actually had occasion to use one of those emergency blankets several years ago.
I don’t expect to ever need one again, but I wasn’t expecting it that time either.

I now carry one of these.  The bulk and weight are insignificant for day hiking when one considers the value it might have if actually needed.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 2:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

An emergency blanket and my poncho/tarp with stakes and cordage.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 2:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No. I do have items I can use for various purposes but nothing solely for "emergency" use.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 2:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

2 contractor size trash bags, an emergency blanket for 2.

I have cut one open for a tarp before. never had to use the emergency blanket.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 2:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(red dog @ Dec. 21 2012, 2:02 pm)
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I actually had occasion to use one of those emergency blankets several years ago.
I don’t expect to ever need one again, but I wasn’t expecting it that time either.

I now carry one of these.  The bulk and weight are insignificant for day hiking when one considers the value it might have if actually needed.

i was tinking of one of those

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 8:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(red dog @ Dec. 21 2012, 2:02 pm)
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I now carry one of these.  

That's exactly what I carry in my emergency kit. I got it after a kayaking mishap that almost left me stranded on a lake one early spring night.

But what season are we talking about?
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 8:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's what I was looking at also.
I found some "tents" made out of the same stuff that you can string up with some string/rope. I wonder if that would be any better?
I'm thinking all season. Just something to keep the wind/rain off of you if things go awry.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 8:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Plastic trash bag and a space blanket (don't know what's it made of - some synthetic -  orange on one side, metalic silver on the other.)   Used it once during an unplanned night out.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 9:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

While I'm sure the plastic bag/space blanket combo worked just fine, I'd rather have something a little more dependable. I'll be looking for something that will support two people also.
I don't mind the extra weight. In fact, I like having a couple pounds in my daypack to help keep me in shape. I always carry extras.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 9:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I carry an REI bivy sack. 15 oz. Light down jacket, fleece bottoms, and extra socks too.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 9:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

OR Advanced Bivy and Golite +40 sleeping bag. Fits in my daypack easily along with a first aid kit, stove, fuel and a meal.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 21 2012, 11:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

10'x12' siltarp @ ~ 20oz. With 2 trekking poles (or a small tree or 2) will make a serious "protection from the elements" shelter.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 2:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 2:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Poncho, stakes, and string.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 8:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like the siltarp. I'm leaning towards something like that.
@toejam.
Good sense is being prepared. Accidents happen regardless of caution and sense. You may not even be the one who needs it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 9:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Dec. 22 2012, 12:39 am)
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No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.

Yeah knowledge in your brain is much lighter than a physical thing but I've taken some hardcore survival courses, as in walk into the wilderness with nothing, and learned a lot.
2 things are at the top of that list.
1: I can do it if necessary.
2: Regardless of the romanticism(?) of books, TV and movies, real survival sucks root.

Carrying something for a shelter and several ways to start a fire are cheap insurance.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 9:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I also will carry a siltarp.  Mine is about 16oz.  Handy if a rain pops up and  you need cover during lunch.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 9:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

An aside... I started carrying a siltarp when hiking and  BPing on the west side of the Cascades in the rain. For BPing, I carried it in an outer pocket. String it up to help stay dry when setting up camp and pitch the tent under. Next morning, tent is still mostly dry and can go inside the pack. Last thing was take down the tarp and stuff back in that outside pocket.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 10:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes, most of the time, out of habit more than anything else.  I take a simple solo silnylon tarp, weighs 9oz with lines.  Could shelter two in a pinch.  I've never had to use it in an emergency overnight situation but it's come in handy sheltering from rain for lunch breaks and waiting for rides at the trailheads.

I have a dayhike ditty bag that I always just grab that has basic things like knife, headlamp, lighter, purification tablets, first aid, duct tape, etc.  Everything else, like food and extra clothing, depends on the hike.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 12:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Dec. 21 2012, 11:39 pm)
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No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.

Good sense is being prepared. How many stories do we see in the news of someone having to be rescued after a simple dayhike?

Not too long ago, I was part of a rescue party for my son's friend and his father. They weren't more than a couple hundred yards from their vehicle when they got turned around. They spent hours out in the cold and then into the night. They would have loved to had a shelter as the storm started coming in. Staying dry equals warm so even a little emergency blanket weighing a few ounces in your pocket on a day hike would make the difference between life and death in many instances.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 1:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

On November 15, 1958 three boy scouts died about 20 miles south of where I live. An un-forecast storm hit them. The day started out warm and sunny. If you get out enough, it can happen. I know a bunch of folks who never took any extras until it happened to them. They all survived but it was very miserable. Hypothermia might kill more than any other condition in the wild.

We take ponchos and a 5x7 tarp all the time, warm and sunny or not. I like the Snugpak Patrol poncho. It’s like a muumuu with sleeves and keeps you and your gear dry. The tarp makes a good shade shelter in hot sunny conditions and gets used mostly for that.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 1:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Arizona @ Dec. 22 2012, 1:23 pm)
QUOTE
On November 15, 1958 three boy scouts died about 20 miles south of where I live.

I don't recall posting a TR here, but I hiked up Wrightson this spring and have been tempted to read the more recent book about that event.

Anyway, I do most of my winter dayhikes in places where good rain clothes and insulating layers are enough to get through an unexpected night out.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 1:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Dec. 22 2012, 6:44 am)
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(Arizona @ Dec. 22 2012, 1:23 pm)
QUOTE
On November 15, 1958 three boy scouts died about 20 miles south of where I live.

I don't recall posting a TR here, but I hiked up Wrightson this spring and have been tempted to read the more recent book about that event.

Anyway, I do most of my winter dayhikes in places where good rain clothes and insulating layers are enough to get through an unexpected night out.

That's a great hike, all the way up through all the life zones from lower desert to alpine. I almost fell off one of the critical switchbacks a few years ago because my EVA footwear had worn out and they were unstable. Actually I did fall off of it but grabbed this poor little bush at the edge, the only thing between me and a long straight dry glissade to the next switchback or the trees or rocks along the way. Slam, bam, no thanks! I replaced the shoes and no more problems until they wore out again several hundred miles later.

That book sounds very interesting.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 3:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi...


Extra large trash bags, space blanket, poncho/shelter-half...plus adequate get-home gear.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 4:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A sheet of plastic (similar to a thick trash bag) and an extra layer of clothing
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 9:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Adventure Medical Kits bivvy may have limited use in winter. AMK doesn't give any indication of the temperatures it's designed for, saying only that it "reflects 90% of body heat." A couple of reviewers say they used it down to 50 degrees. One mentioned he survived in the 30s but "I  won't say I was comfortable and warm in it." One says he was cold at 40 degrees. A couple of people say it adds about 10 degrees of warmth. Most people report a lot of condensation.

But the point is survival, not necessarily comfort. Maybe an extra 10 degrees might be what you need to survive. Maybe protection from rain or wind could prevent hypothermia. For example, if the temperature is 40F + wind + rain that is considered a risk for hypothermia. If the bivvy brings you up to 50F that would be useful. But if the daytime temperature during a winter dayhike is a comfortable 32F and it falls to 10F at night, I think you're in trouble with this bivvy.  


I will still take this on all trips year round. But if I were going any distance in the winter on a day hike, I would consider carrying a sleeping bag if the nighttime temperature is expected to be below freezng. E.g., a 2-lb 35F down bag might be worth carrying. Heck, my folding seat weighs 24 oz. You would be better off adding another 10 oz and carrying a sleeping bag instead.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 22 2012, 10:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Dec. 22 2012, 2:39 am)
QUOTE
No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.

A day hike is something you plan for.  An unexpected night in the woods is something you prepare for.  Not knowing the difference could cost you your life.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 23 2012, 11:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toejam @ Dec. 22 2012, 2:39 am)
QUOTE
No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.

Wow. Famous last words.

In my experience it takes about one second to make a mistake that radically changes a situation that appeared foolproof. That mistake may be unrelated to common sense. It may be more related to the many things that have to go right in the course of a day---including each step you take. What are the chances that all of those things will go right, every hike, for the rest of your life?

Also, very minor mistakes in judgment and seemingly small inconveniences have a way of snowballing into a dangerous situation. Love reading about Everest mishaps to see that process in action.

One more point: You're not always alone on the trail. Your fate may may be tied to someone else's. On the way down you encounter a hiker with a broken ankle an hour before dark. You barely left time to get yourself down at a good trot, but you stop to help and you realize the guy isn't going anywhere before morning.

So you don't prepare for the known and hoped-for conditions. You prepare for the unknown and unexpected scenarios.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 23 2012, 11:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
toejam @ Dec. 22 2012, 2:39 am
No - not on day hikes. Good sense is so much lighter.


Not sure what good sense allows you to completely prevent situations where you are unable to make it out before night (e.g. being alone on the trail (or off) with sprained ankles, broken legs, sudden intense storms).  Good sense involves being prepared, and bringing an emergency shelter might be exactly that.
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