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Topic: First Aide kit, Do you make your own?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 12:45 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When it comes to the first aid kit, do you make your own or buy a ready made one? If you do make your own, what are the main items that you use? Need a kit and not quite sure what I need for me and my son for overnighter/weekend trips.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I based mine largely off of this guy's list.
http://sectionhiker.com/lightweight-first-aid-gear-list/

You may want a couple extra bandages, or less ibuprofin, or something altogether not listed, but it's a good starting point, at least.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I started with a "basic" kit and added my own stuff...as I had more accidents. I have two splints, a few small bandaids, two large gauze pads and tape, Eye goop for scratches, etc., Silvidaine (spelling) for burns, ibuprofen, Vicodin, Morphine, Tums, Heartburn medicine, anti-diarrhea, ear plugs, alcohol swabs, triple antibiotic goop, tweezers, suture kit, gloves, an emergency whistle attached to the zipper, and misc.

I get prescriptions and samples from my doctor. Anything else, I restock from the pharmacy, etc.


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I stole everything from the office first-aid cabinet. So yeah make your own. Put it in a zip lock bag and that should be all you need to carry it in.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm pretty close to EastieTrekker.
That's a decent kit. I bring some extras, but not much.
Be careful about repacking your meds into zip baggies as they can expire and actually become poisonous. I always bring individually packaged meds when I can.
I toss in eye drops.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ Dec. 26 2012, 1:24 pm)
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Be careful about repacking your meds into zip baggies as they can expire and actually become poisonous. I always bring individually packaged meds when I can.

I did not mean remove the individual meds from the original packages.

Just that you don't need some heavy bag like some of the store bought first-aid kits have. You ave all seen them big red nylon bag with a white cross on it. A million little pockets all sewn in them. 2 million little zippers. They weigh a ton


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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 1:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have an industrial grade nurse’s station across the hall from my office.  Stocking up is not an issue.  I get to be the medic on group trips and I have kits up to and including everything you need to do field surgery.  I have kits scattered everywhere and the one in my truck is in its own backpack.  If I’m solo, I have a 1.5 oz bottle of new skin liquid bandage, about 2 feet of duct tape folded flat, then that is wrapped in about 3 feet of self adhering wrap like 3M Coban, Medirip or Dynarex.  I start adding meds depending on how long the trip will take or how remote it will be.  My goal is to not haul something around unless there is a pretty good chance I’ll need it.  If the wife, kids or grandkids are coming, that kit starts taking up a lot of room.  Sooner or later, somebody will set themselves on fire, and go screaming through the woods bouncing off trees.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 2:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Started with a generic one. Added stuff as I thought of it, or needed it. More Ibuprophen and Benadryl. Removed small bandaids in favor of larger ones than I can trim down.

Tablets, not gel's. The gels melt to each other.

I use bottle instead of blister packs. I find it easier to open the little bottle than the blisters. I am OK with losing the space rather than fumbling with packaging.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 3:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Made one with mostly the basics. Some bandaides, few guaze pads, small roll of guaze, some tape, ibuprofin, moleskin, heartburn meds, anti-diarrhea (very important IMO. Diarrhea in the "bush" can be a killer), Benadryl can also be a life saver incase of alergic reaction to an insect sting or severe allergies, few butterfly sutures as well as a silk thread suture kit. some q-tips, alcohol swabs...I think that's it. Weighs maybe 4-5oz. and takes up little room in the pack. I do need to add some sort of tick removal tool before spring rolls around.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 3:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Spit, dirt and an old T-shirt.  Whiskey for medicinal purposes only;)  Sometimes some of that new fangled medicine we just voted to legalize here in CO.  I used to pack a basic home made kit but the meds kept expiring so I stopped restocking it and bringing it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 4:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a pretty extensive kit that I carry in my vehicle and a couple of smaller ones for backpacking.  One of those two is larger and I take it on multi-person trips and the smaller of the two I take when going solo.  I pretty much try to stick to just the basics when hiking.  I compiled all the contents myself but do have them in factory carrying kits.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 4:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi...


Many of the items included above. Also included in my home and UTE FAK is a commercially made trauma kit which contains blood-stopping bandages, QuikKlot (a good blood-stopping powder), etc.

My trauma kits were purchased from Cabela's, which were more reasonably priced then from other outlets selling the same product.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 26 2012, 4:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Fatpacking's comment about a tick removal tool reminded me.  I keep a "Tick Key" tied to my compass.  I don't hike in Arkansas without both.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 27 2012, 12:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thank you all for the replies. I looked at a couple of the kits at my local Big5 and decided that I will just put together one myself. I think I can go a lot more compact than what they were offering and still have the needed items for me and my son.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 27 2012, 2:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

smart choice. Its better to make your own kit because then you know for sure what is in it and you will put only things you truely need in it.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 27 2012, 5:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Band-Aids, Neomycin travel-size,  and some pressure bandages.  Some OTC pills if needed.  Tweezers for desert trips in the cacti.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 12:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You guys should check out a CAT (combat application tourniquet). They're available on the civilian side, but it is the tourniquets that we use in the military today. They're lightweight nylon/velcro with a plastic windlass and are large enough for arms and legs. Easy to put on one handed (which may be necessary if you're bleeding out from one of your arms. Most people dont think too much about tourniquets but they are a necessity, IMO. An ounce or two extra for something that you know is going to work properly instead of trying to fiddle with a stick and torn T Shirt is worth it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 10:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Base your FA kit on your needs.  You don't need the kitchen sink (like my truck has).  Enough to possibly really give you help on fairly major accidents and badaids for the minor.  Tailor meds to you. Ensure your group carries there own.  For a longer trip split it between partners.  A CAT is good advice (from above) but go step further, take 2 of them.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 7:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I got one of the adventure medical kits from REI - the $12 one I think. I had too much in it, so I pared it back and added some stuff of my own, including a little pink victorinox knife, the tweezers in those things are worth the $10 cost of the knife. Why pink? So when I drop the damn thing in the leaves, it shows up...

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 11:02 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Fatpacking @ Dec. 26 2012, 12:45 pm)
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Made one with mostly the basics. Some bandaides, few guaze pads, small roll of guaze, some tape, ibuprofin, moleskin, heartburn meds, anti-diarrhea (very important IMO. Diarrhea in the "bush" can be a killer), Benadryl can also be a life saver incase of alergic reaction to an insect sting or severe allergies, few butterfly sutures as well as a silk thread suture kit. some q-tips, alcohol swabs...I think that's it. Weighs maybe 4-5oz. and takes up little room in the pack. I do need to add some sort of tick removal tool before spring rolls around.

Mine's a lot like this. I started from a ready-made kit, and customized.  I carry a lot of extra band-aids and could cut back now the boys are past the point where a band-aid fixes everything.

Question: what's the shelf-life on Tylenol with codeine?  I have a supply from my recent surgery, and would like to add it to the kit in case of a serious injury, but the expiry they wrote on it was clearly just the point where they wanted me to stop taking them --about a week.

Safe/effective if repackaged in a vacuum-sealed bag?  For how long?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 12:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The chemical composition will break down. They "say" two years for most drugs but you can still use them. They'll just lose potency.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 2:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, that would be two years of having it on the off chance we need it.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 2:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I make my own. The most important items are ACE bandages and athletic tape. Everything else is secondary, but some of it is nice to have, like: bandaids, single use neosporin packs, couple of 2x2" and 2x3" bandages, spare chapstick, anti-diahrreals, anti-chafing gel, Victorinox Classic(has scissors, tweezers, etc). Also keep half a dozen Katadyn MicroPur tabs in case something happens to the water filter, spare lithium flashlight battery, and a stretch gauze bandage. Even if I'm having joint worries, and carry both an ankle and knee support, it all easily fits in a quart ziploc bag.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 3:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Make my own.  I'm 50, have travelled quite a bit and and my first aid kit is the result.  I've never needed a tourniquet.  I usually have one in the car (trailhead) and a pared down one in my pack.

One in my pack has a variety of bandages like band-aids, Telfa pads, butterfly strips, gauze pads, etc., some sort of disinfectant/antispetic, small roll of athletic tape.  For meds, I carry ibuprofin, benadryl, immodium.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 7:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Never buy a ready-made first aid kit. It is a waste of money.

You need to build your own with what you will use/need. A lot of that will come with experience - some things that you find you need others may not mention.

My first aid kit has the following in it: Forceps (you'd be surprised how handy these can be), medical tape, gauze, butterfly sutures, benadryl (or other antihistimene), bandaids, duct tape, ibuprofin (or other pain medicine), cold medicine, cough drops.  

Butterfly sutures are a MUST in my kit.

Duct tape - flat packs - strip off about 6-8' and fold up sticky side down, about 1.5-2" fold. I use this on my feet more than anything - great to help prevent blisters. Before every hike I put duct tape over a few key areas I have had blisters and hot spots in the past as a precaution - my morning ritual before hitting the trail again.

Additional things in my first aid kit, not necessarily people first aid - sewing needle, thimble, and some thread. I also use a lot of 550 chord so if you split that there is string inside you can use as thread as well. I also have some repair parts sometimes to fix things on the trail if need-be (depending on what I take). Extra batteries are nice - I always carry a change of AAA's for my head lamp, AA's for my camera, etc.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 20 2013, 8:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I make my own.  I've taken several first aide kits and pulled stuff out that you won't need on the trail and added in extras that aren't usually included.  It's like a frankenstein kit.  I also carry a homemade survival kit with essential incase something happens while I'm on a trip.  

Some items in mine:
- large bandages
- burn cream
- aloe
- pain killers
- Imodium AD
- duct tape (a must!)
- Ace bandage wrap

Like Tigger mentioned above... make sure your drugs in the first aide kit are replaced otherwise they lose their effectiveness.  

The survival kit has:
- fishing line and hook
- Water purifier drops
- fire starting supplies
- small candle
- various bandages

For some reason, when companies that make first aide kits were designing them, the didn't have backpackers in mind.  

Stu
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