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Topic: Snow buildup on gaiter loop< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 12:57 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In the winter, how do you avoid snow buildup on the loop that goes under your boot on your gaiters?

I do not notice any buildup until after I have gone through a ‘wet area’ and the loop gets wet.  But once this loop gets wet, the snow accumulates until you have to bust it off.  This buildup is most annoying.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 1:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Pam.

Probably some silicone sprays that would work as well. Just something to repel the water.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 2:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What is the gaiter strap made of? As it may  require some other type of material so you don't get it iced up.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 2:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My guess would be it's cord rather than, say, neoprene. My summer ones are cord.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 4:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(QCHIKER @ Jan. 02 2013, 2:12 pm)
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What is the gaiter strap made of? As it may  require some other type of material so you don't get it iced up.

On one pair of gaiters I have replaced the broken nylon cord with trip-tease.

On a second pair, the loop is a woven nylon (at least I think it is nylon) strap.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 4:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Jan. 02 2013, 1:14 pm)
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Pam.

Probably some silicone sprays that would work as well. Just something to repel the water.

Have you done this yourself?  If so, what were your results?

I may try this on my next winter jaunt.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 4:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've done it on snowsaw and snow shovel blades, my winter gaiters have a neoprene strap* (an older Chouinard high gaiter) where buildup isn't an issue. On the metal it keeps the buildup minimal. I seem to recall the original idea was about crampons, but I've so seldom found a need that I've no real experience on that use.

It's along the lines of nordic ski waxes: you've got to keep that initial ice from getting hold, so something that repels water is going to lessen the possibility of liquid water soaking the cord (?) and freezing to be followed up by snow buildup. Once that initial ice layer is there (like with Klister Wax when the temp heads down...) the next bit of ice crystals to come in contact just grabs hold.

Rather than a spray it might be even more effective to soak the cord in some sort of DWR treatment. Water that's been repelled can't freeze and give snow traction....

* It seems Black Diamond still uses a strap on some of their gaiters: maybe you could buy some of their replacement straps if your usage was high enough to warrant the trouble?
http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-eur/shop/mountain/gaiters/apex
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 5:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HSF has the right idea (a treatment to prevent the initial ice from taking hold).  I think DWR treatment is worth a try.

If it helps to give you some perspective, take a look at the strap on the OR Crocodile Gaiters.  http://www.rei.com/product/725915/outdoor-research-crocodile-gaiters-unisex

If you hover your mouse over the picture, you get a zoomed in view.  Hover over the strap, and you'll see that it's "shiny".  It's almost like a polyurethane coating on the strap that prevents any moisture from being absorbed.

ETA: Actually it's described as a "urethane-coated nylon instep strap", so some kind of treatment along those lines should help! And HSF beat me to it, as i was going to suggest seeing if you could find a "urethane-coated" type replacement strap that would work with your gaiters.  Good luck!


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 5:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Coat them with sho goo?

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 5:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't much like the straps on OR Crocs, but this problem is why they're built that way.   It would be nice if the buckles were big enough to undo with gloves on.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 8:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've got a pair of OR Crocs and haven't had any freeze up problem with the strap. That is why I asked about what the strap was made of. I'd  say go with  some type of silicone treatment or some else that will repel the water. Maybe  even mink oil or snowseal like used on boots.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 8:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

DWR. Mind you, if you've got surface to grab, ice will build. I have OR Crocks also. I did use WD-40 two years back as part of an experiment. It worked great but they stunk to hell and high water the trip so it sucked having them in my shelter.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 11:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use OR women's crocodile gaiters which have a fairly wide strap.  What little ice build up I get I can remove by hitting them on a tree or my partner's behind.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 10:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(toesnorth @ Jan. 02 2013, 11:39 pm)
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I use OR women's crocodile gaiters which have a fairly wide strap.  What little ice build up I get I can remove by hitting them on a tree or my partner's behind.

Mental note: Hike behind toesnorth.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 10:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(tomas @ Jan. 03 2013, 7:24 am)
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(toesnorth @ Jan. 02 2013, 11:39 pm)
QUOTE
I use OR women's crocodile gaiters which have a fairly wide strap.  What little ice build up I get I can remove by hitting them on a tree or my partner's behind.

Mental note: Hike behind toesnorth.

+1

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2013, 8:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry for not responding earlier, but I have been sick and have not been on the site for a while.

Thanks for the responses.  

What about that stuff you dip tool handles into - would that work?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2013, 9:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(JonW @ Jan. 07 2013, 8:39 am)
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Sorry for not responding earlier, but I have been sick and have not been on the site for a while.

Thanks for the responses.  

What about that stuff you dip tool handles into - would that work?

That might work if it is the smooth stuff as they make some that has a texture to it in spray on form.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2013, 3:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

this is the reason crampons come with anti-balling plates; snow accumulates underfoot.  i agree, the shiny/slick straps on the OR crocs avoid this issue.

i personally wouldn't put silicone spray anywhere near the soles of my boots.  that's a ticket to a wipe-out, and it could contaminate/damage the soles or outers of your boots.  

perhaps you could replace the nylon loop with baling wire for the winter.  or, you could get a pair of dirty girl gaiters, they don't have loops under your feet.  i think some hardcore ultralighters end up stitching gaiters directly to their shoes - lighter-weight boots don't have a good place for gaiter straps & really tear them up.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 07 2013, 4:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

LB - I have a pair of Dirty Girl gaiters and I see these for summer use to keep debris out of the tops of shoes.  I do not see them being used to keep snow out of the tops of your boots.

The gaiters that had the problem that I was referring to is a brand new pair from REI called Havenpass.  I am thoroughly disappointed in them.  While I have never sent anything back to them for bad performance, I think it is now time.   Get the OR Crocs instead.
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18 replies since Jan. 02 2013, 12:57 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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