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Topic: Most durable down coat ever?, Weight is not a factor< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 8:33 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What's the most durable down coat/brand out there? Is there one that is made for really heavy use and totally free from feather/down leaks?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 8:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Not trying to be sarcastic: Yes, Put a rainshell over the top of your down jacket. I'm an off-trail hiker who snowshoes through thick brush often in winter. Mind you, I'm usually just hiking in the rainshell and only use the down layer underneath when I get to camp. It's too dang hot to hike in a down jacket unless I don't have a pack on.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Canada Goose brand.  The real McCoy version, not the asian knockoffs.

http://www.canada-goose.com
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

With weight not a factor why even bother with down?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Woolrich 60/40 shell.  Or TNF . Good for standing around at football games when it's 400 below.  Not much else. but damn tough and warm.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Jan. 02 2013, 9:16 pm)
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With weight not a factor why even bother with down?

What would you say is better then?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

To beat the crap out of with weight not an issue and no temperature range or activity level specified?

Probably a Woolrich or Carhartts parka. Not much is tougher than wool.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 9:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

LLBean, Cabelas.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 02 2013, 10:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Jan. 02 2013, 9:41 pm)
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To beat the crap out of with weight not an issue and no temperature range or activity level specified?

Probably a Woolrich or Carhartts parka. Not much is tougher than wool.

Sorry should have specified hiking and backpacking in colder weather.. don't know if Carhartt would be warm enough but those are awesome I need to get a new one.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 6:45 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Back in the mid/late 90's I had to work outside in MN during the winter. We all had Carhartt Arctic Parkas. Down (and the shells made to hold it) would last maybe 3 days.

But I sure as heck never took that backpacking. Why do you want a tough coat for hiking? Do you wear your parka while you hike?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 11:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Jan. 03 2013, 6:45 am)
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Back in the mid/late 90's I had to work outside in MN during the winter. We all had Carhartt Arctic Parkas. Down (and the shells made to hold it) would last maybe 3 days.

But I sure as heck never took that backpacking. Why do you want a tough coat for hiking? Do you wear your parka while you hike?

I tend to hike in areas with a lot of things that like to grab on to down coats and rip them. Yes, I do wear really warm coats (is there something that makes a parka different than an ultra-warm down coat?) while hiking because I run really cold.

Unless I'm deliberately moving as fast as possible and moving my arms a lot to build up heat, I tend to be pretty darn cold.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 11:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well then this should do you:

http://www.carhartt.com/webapp....ngId=-1


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 6:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

i have to agree with the canada goose and carhartt recommendations if you want max warmth and durability, independent of weight.  or you could try winter jackets intended for hunters.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 03 2013, 7:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a canvas chore coat. (Tractor Supply Company)
Put a fleece under it and I am good to about 20 degrees. I have done to teens and been OK. Not great, but OK. I also don't like the cold.

Take the fleece off and comfortable at 50 or so.
It is canvas shell, polyester fill and lined. Tough as nails and washes in the laundry.

I wore my last one out after 10 years or so. All the fluff fell to the hems so my butt was warm, but that was about it. The shell never ripped, even though I used it for everything from automechanics to painting. They are designed for daily wear on farms and ranches.

But it's not down.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 04 2013, 1:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I guess I can't quite relate because if I am hiking at a good pace, there's no way I could be wearing a heavy winter coat unless it was 20 below - and even then, probably lighter layers.

I agree with High Sierra Fan, down might not be a necessary insulating material if weight isn't an issue. For durability, as mentioned, the Carthartts and Canada goose (but you'll pay plenty for the latter).
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 04 2013, 6:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Duluth Trading Company makes a down parka that is good to -20º F and its outer shell is firehose canvas.  It is the toughest down jacket I have ever seen and I have four shelled down lined coats.

I highly recommend the Duluth.  It is heavy though, but I like the weight.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 04 2013, 2:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Jan. 03 2013, 9:11 am)
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Well then this should do you:

http://www.carhartt.com/webapp....ngId=-1

Thanks for the link.  It's not my thread, but it piqued my interest after I damaged a flimsier down coat during field work last Spring.  Thin shells and steel hardware just don't mix well.

(First patched hole of several that week.)


Those are affordable, and might fit the bill for me.  I wouldn't foresee needing one while hiking (even in the coldest temps, when hiking a couple fleece layers and a hardshell do the trick for me), but working stationary on an ice sheet, or driving snowmobiles long distances, a good durable down parka is wonderful.  I'm gonna look into the Duluth jackets Mr. Templar noted above as well.  Thanks again!

- Mike

...and "bump", FWIW.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 04 2013, 2:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mike, they make an insulated overall (pants) that works in conjunction with them too. Same materials and tough enough to handle construction sites. I still have my pants but got the parka stolen when I took it off to come inside at a site. My wife was SOOO mad at me!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 05 2013, 9:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

llbean waxed cotton down jacket. I absolutely love mine and use it all winter long on my trips. A real bomb proof down jacket.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2013, 6:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GoBlueHiker @ Jan. 04 2013, 10:18 am)
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Thin shells and steel hardware just don't mix well.

^this^

+1


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2013, 10:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(SmokeyBear @ Jan. 04 2013, 1:53 am)
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I guess I can't quite relate because if I am hiking at a good pace, there's no way I could be wearing a heavy winter coat unless it was 20 below - and even then, probably lighter layers.

My thoughts exactly.

That said assuming you want durability and lots of warmth and don't care about weight I really don't see the need for down.  Wear a durable outside layer like Carthartts and use as many layers of pile under it as you need.

I guess that hunting clothing from places like Cabelas or Bass Pro Shops would meet your requirements as you stated them, but I personally wouldn't want to hike in most of them.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 06 2013, 2:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TrailTromper @ Jan. 06 2013, 10:04 am)
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That said assuming you want durability and lots of warmth and don't care about weight I really don't see the need for down.  

Because weight != bulk. There are times I'm not too worried about weight, but being able to move remains a priority. Down is warmer than fleece and more squishable (is that a word?) for moving around, so it's great for working in reallyCold. That many pile layers would leave me with my arms hanging out at a permanent 45* angle.  :laugh:
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