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Topic: Snowshoes< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
reubenstump Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 3:33 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm still hoping for something resembling snow, and I'm getting itchy.  So I'm contemplating snowshoes to go with the boots I haven't bought.  The MSR Denali is on sale at REI, and they seem to be pretty well respected.

The main difference between the Denali and the Evo seems to be load, correct?
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 3:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Check out SectionHiker's website - he's giving away a pair of MSR Lightening Axis 'shoes.  I won a Platypus Gravity Filter in his last raffle!  

http://sectionhiker.com/gear-cl....owshoes

FWIW - the load does appear to be the biggest difference.  One thing I noticed is the straps on the Denali.  I've seen folks struggle with that particular system (especially while trying to maintain "gloved" hands).  A 125lb load limit seems REALLY low though.  Maybe they're geared towards kids?


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2013, 6:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

25 lbs really is low especially if you're carrying any kind of winter pack.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2013, 4:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

float = you with winter gear + backpack.  unless you are pretty small and don't plan to carry much, you might want a shoe with more float than the Denali.  the EVO has the advantage of being able to add a 'tail' that increases the surface area, hence the flotation.  

both of those snowshoes have a molded plastic frame and deck.  consider how much you plan to use them & the conditions.  the more you tend to use them off-trail, where you may encounter hidden obstacles, and the more use you plan, the more you may want a sturdier design with an aluminum frame & nylon decking - like on the lightning ascent or most of the Atlas snowshoes.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 13 2013, 7:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My wife and I both have the 10 series of Atlas Snowshoes and they work great for us. They provide plenty of traction especially when traversing a slope. Plus they are easy ot get in and out of, and they don't loosen up.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 1:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(reubenstump @ Jan. 11 2013, 3:33 pm)
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The main difference between the Denali and the Evo seems to be load, correct?

Have they started shaping the Denali? Used to be there was a slight taper to the Evo tail that was really nice if you have a short or narrow stride.

Can't comment on the load ratings: I'm way under 180lbs, even with a heavy winter pack (and on the East coast), so I've never sunk more than a couple of inches even in untracked snow.

I have Evo ascent and Atlas 12 series. Love both of them, especially the heel bar for extended uphill. I think the crampons on the Atlas might be a little better for downhill on areas that aren't flat enough to allow the MSR rails to bite, but by that time I'm usually in crampons anyway.

Caveat: I walked all over the instep of my Atlas and wore out the decking with the rail of the other 'shoe. I'm pretty sure that's specific to my gait, though, since my climbing partner's 'shoes look brand new.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 6:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks everyone.  I think I've narrowed it down.  Does a heel lift make much of a difference?  I could find some short steep hills around here, but nothing too long, so I'm thinking I won't miss it.

Now all I need is cold and precipitation.  50 and rain for a few days, then cold but no precip over the weekend.  Grrr...
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 9:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I want to get into snow shoeing too. I live in an area that sees not much snow...when we get it we tend to get a lot, but these days, those days are few and far between. Fortunately a little over an hour away I have access to all the snow I could ever want. I've been looking really hard at the Atlas 10 series but I'll probably rent a time or two to make sure it's an investment I want to make. In addition to the shoes...I'll need new boots too which increases the total cost since I don't really have snow shoeing appropriate boots at the moment.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 9:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Fatpacking @ Jan. 14 2013, 9:25 pm)
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Fortunately a little over an hour away I have access to all the snow I could ever want.

Shoot, that ain't nothing to complain about.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 9:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I can't let this pass without suggesting that anyone interested in snowshoes should try out XC skiing.  On any terrain where you can use them, XC skis are much faster and generally require far less effort per mile than snowshoes.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 11:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Big Load is very accurate. XC skiing is way more efficient.




This is my trail going up an obscure canyon. It's the decent that makes the difference. This low elevation, easy tour takes 4 hours going up breaking trail. The upside is that it takes less than an hour going down, thus saving 3 hours vs. snowshoes. Gliding back through the trees in peace and quiet is awesome.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 14 2013, 11:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Jan. 14 2013, 9:54 pm)
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I can't let this pass without suggesting that anyone interested in snowshoes should try out XC skiing.  On any terrain where you can use them, XC skis are much faster and generally require far less effort per mile than snowshoes.

+1.  Yesterday I went x-country skiing on a 10 mile trail - 5 in and 5 out.  On the way in, which was gently uphill, I passed a party of snowshoers coming out.  After I passed them, I continued for another hour and a half or so and then turned around.  Very quickly on the way out I passed the snowshoers plodding along and was at the trailhead way before them although they had a very considerable time lead on me.  Faster and certainly more fun.  Admittedly, the learning curve is significanly steeper and skiis are not alway appropriate in very steep terrain, i.e. swithcbacks or thick timber, but they sure are fun.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 15 2013, 12:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Snowshoeing requires more calories and the speed is slower.  It is the ability to move off the trail with a 60# backpack on powder the reach a high glacier, or traverse steep hills filled with trees to make camp.  It cannot be compared.  A little daytime run with snowshoes never hurts also!  :p  praying for snow..........
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 15 2013, 11:19 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LongsPeak @ Jan. 15 2013, 12:54 am)
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Snowshoeing requires more calories and the speed is slower.  It is the ability to move off the trail with a 60# backpack on powder the reach a high glacier, or traverse steep hills filled with trees to make camp.  It cannot be compared.  A little daytime run with snowshoes never hurts also!  :p  praying for snow..........

Well said.  They each have their own place and rewards.  As always, use what works best for you in a particular circumstance.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 15 2013, 11:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(LongsPeak @ Jan. 14 2013, 9:54 pm)
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Snowshoeing requires more calories and the speed is slower.  It is the ability to move off the trail with a 60# backpack on powder the reach a high glacier, or traverse steep hills filled with trees to make camp.  It cannot be compared.  A little daytime run with snowshoes never hurts also!  :p  praying for snow..........

+2

I have two pairs of snowshoes and a pair of XC skis. My skis collect dust because of the type of terrain I love to be in.


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 Post Number: 16
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 15 2013, 7:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've never been skiing but I know how to walk. I figure snow shoeing would be my best intro into "snow sports". That, and I need the exercise. Maybe someday I'll try XC skiing. Up around Canaan Valley, WV, they have loads of dedicated XC skiing trails, so there's no issue finding a place to go play.
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