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Topic: Newbie Question Re: Cookware< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
SurlyShawn Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 2:21 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am getting some gear together through work (gotta love stuff at cost!) and the only thing I seem to be missing right now, is a decent pot or pan. I picked up an Olicamp Vector Stove through work (I hope it doesn't suck, I can't find any reviews on it), and have the rest of the essentials covered.  

I am not a coffee drinker, so take that out of the equation. I am looking more for 'water based' recipes, freeze dried(?), ramens, rice, etc. I have several state parks near me, so I can go on some test runs before I fully commit. I am not sure what size pot is ideal.

Budget is not a concern, but at the same time, I don't need a $100 pot or pan, unless it cleans itself and cooks on it's own while I sleep.

Thanks in advance.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 3:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The diameter of your flame should help you determine your pot style. I'm not familiar with your particular stove. I personally use a .9 liter pot. I boil water for freeze dried and pour the water directly in the bag and also make coffee in the pot. That's it. I don't like doing dishes while I am hiking. Rice...you might want to consider non-stick. I personally use a Snowpeak Ti pot. It cost around $50.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 6:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Your stove is kind of a Pocket Rocket knock-off. Pretty much any pot will work but remember you have a pot holder diameter of 3.8". Personally I would use a narrow pot. If it is just you solo and you are making freeze dried meals then any pot with a volume of 20 fl oz would be fine. Go up from there depending on the amount of people or if you make more than one thing at once.

Two of my favorite solo pots are the Snow Peak Mini Solo (sometimes I leave the cup at home) and the Snow Peak Trek 700 Titanium.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 7:44 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My first foray into a lighter weight setup for cookware involved using the small pot that comes in a $5.00 mess kit.

What Tigger and Ray said about diameter is very true, but if you have one handy try that a few times and see if you can deal w/the type of cooking you're considering.  Then move up, (as you inevitably will), to better gear.

Check out Sarbar btw in the cooking section on these forums for great recipes in her book about Freezer Bag Cooking...it literally changed my idea of eating on the trail


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treelinebackpacker Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 8:51 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd recommend this guy
http://www.gsioutdoors.com/activit....packing
You could start out cheaper, but you'll just end up spending more money quickly anyway.
This is small, but should boil plenty of water. They have a few alternatives if you want something a bit taller and slightly wider.
The smaller the less chance of spillage you'll have.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 11:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1.  I agree with treeline.  I have several gsi cooking systems and have been well  pleased with them.  For the money, I think they're a pretty good deal.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 12:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you are only going to boil water in the pot and then pour into another container, you can get by with a smaller pot size than if you may also be reconstituting food in the pot. I have reconstituted Enertia Trail Foods meals in a 3 cup (about .7L) pot, usually with a little canned tuna or chicken mixed in,  and found it to just barely have enough room. A tea kettle can be nice if one is only boiling water. Another consideration if you are rehydrating food in the pot is a pot cozy, which will keep the food hot for a longer period of time. You can simply use a warm hat or sweater, but it is better to use a cozy made for the pot. Antigravitygear sells cozies that will fit many pots, and some of the GSI pots come with them, or you can make you own.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 12:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

GSI Outdoors Soloist kit comes with an insulated mug/bowl, pot, spork, and strainer lid for $44 and all packs in the pot. Pretty nice piece of kit.
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treelinebackpacker Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 1:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm actually picking up the Dualist the first chance I get.
It will be nice for those long trips, where I tend to get more creative with my cooking.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 1:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If the extent of your cooking will be boiling water, I suggest going the GSI route of HAA (hard anodized aluminium). Cheap, reasonably light and it holds up. Non-stick is nice, but not needed. The anodizing gives a mostly non-stick finish and no metal taste.

As for pot size? If one person and just boiling water you can get by on a .9 to 1 liter. If you might want to actually cook go up to a 1.3 or 1.4 liter. Wide pots are easier to clean, but narrow packs better.


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SurlyShawn Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 3:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks everyone! I will check out all of these suggestions.

Sorry for the rambling-ness of my post. It was late when I wrote it, under the influence of prescription cough syrup. Hahaha.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 9:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ditto's on the GSI recommendations, I have 3 different sets and they are all great.  Easy to clean, light, packable and just work well.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 16 2013, 9:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For simple water boiling i like the GSI kettle. It comes as a kit, which may be overkill, a plastic breakfast bowl and a lexan spoon does it for me, but anyway:
http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/pdp/halulite_ketalist

Or just the kettle, which at $22.95 leaves a lot of room for getting a grocery store plastic bowl and a spoon....
http://www.gsioutdoors.com/product....ookware
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 6:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

MSR makes some fantastic cookware.  http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/cookware/category

I have a set that include a pot, skillet and several storage containers.  I never take the entire set out unless I'm car camping... but I have on a number of occasions taken either just the skillet or the pot depending on what my other hiking partners are carrying.  

Stu
www.stuthetraveler.com


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 12:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Everyone who references a kit, sooner or later, inserts "I never carry the entire kit but..."

Hence the question is raised: why buy the extra stuff in the first place? Seems like buying a Happy Meal and always leaving the fries behind.... at least to me.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 12:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have experiment with a lot of different pots, for me I ended up with the MSR Titan Kettle. It just seems to fit all of my needs.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 12:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hike500 @ Jan. 17 2013, 12:19 pm)
QUOTE
I have experiment with a lot of different pots, for me I ended up with the MSR Titan Kettle. It just seems to fit all of my needs.

Same here.  Once in a while I bring a frying pan.  I have a couple of those, but no favorite or even one I like very much.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 1:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I played with some different pots. I don't like the bail on my Boy Scout Mess Kit cook pot. I dumped a lot of hot water on the ground with it.

The one that I currently have packed is a titanium that was supposed to be for an on counter utinsel holder. I nest all my stuff inside, including other cooking stuff, some teflon pinch type potholders, and a ziploc condiment bag.

It is bigger than what most of the people on this list carry, I am sure.

It will hold 1.5 liters of water, but I don't normally put that much in unless I am doing some purification\melt etc.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 4:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(High_Sierra_Fan @ Jan. 17 2013, 9:10 am)
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Everyone who references a kit, sooner or later, inserts "I never carry the entire kit but..."

Hence the question is raised: why buy the extra stuff in the first place? Seems like buying a Happy Meal and always leaving the fries behind.... at least to me.

I actually carry the majority of the kits - IF I have a need for it on that trip. But I also have somewhere around 30 pots and pot sets/kettles/etc.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 4:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That's more my kitchen than my gear closet, though even I'll admit to having more than a few of each, reaching back to a pair of SIGGS down through some MSR and REI ti pots and kettles to a GSI kit with that kettle... and now I only take the kettle hence my comment.

The bright green plastic grocery cereal bowl and plastic cup is still my ones from the 70's, my Sierra Cup is from the 60's. Somewhat consistent with my kitchen: I'll slide something off an Al-Clad CopperCore frypan onto some anonymous plastic plate from decades ago.... or some equally ancient FiestaWare. Heck most of my glasses came from back when you got them free with a fill-up of a tank of gas! :D

Nice cookware I'll sometimes invest in, tableware gets a "meh"....
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2013, 10:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use a Crux stove with a MSR Kettle and use a squishy bowl.  Works and is light.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 18 2013, 11:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't have a whole lot of experience, but will share mine.

I too am going the FB method. So I got a GSI kettle. I didn't get the set, because I didn't know about them. I am glad that I didn't. For one thing the spoon would be too short for the FB. For that I went with a long Optimus titanium spoon. Between those two, I can do the FB method pretty good. Like others, I will take a fry pan for shorter trips.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 19 2013, 1:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(bbobb169 @ Jan. 17 2013, 8:29 pm)
QUOTE
I use a Crux stove with a MSR Kettle and use a squishy bowl.  Works and is light.

Exactly what I use but not the bowl, I eat right out of the pot.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 19 2013, 2:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Let’s take a second and think of a backpacking system, how it all works together and not just individual items.
RE: The Pot

Sure there are lots of great opinions (above) on what size / diameter pot works best with what flame pattern…actual cooking vs. boiling water…titanium, non-stick, aluminum… whatever.

For me, a dirt-bag, wilderness, High Sierra, fanatic fisherman, who goes out for 10+ days at a time, usually off-trail, my total weight carried always includes fishing gear, and a way to cook them at altitude.
I also like to actually cook – (not yet totally weaned from all the ghastly Boil-n-bag meals yet but pretty damn close.).  FYI, My all-up weight is usually less than 35 pounds. In order to keep weight down, all gear multi-tasks if possible.

What works best for me is carrying a slightly larger, lightweight aluminum ~2 liter pot – inside safely, a MSR Windpro (the windscreen in stuffsack under pot) and my Penn SS420 spinning reel. A hot pad, spork, extra spool of 4-pound line, and a few Bic lighters also live in the pot.

Thus in one, cantaloupe-size package, my stove and reel are protected, and I can cook/simmer rice or pasta concoctions. FYI, I also carry a 10-inch titanium fry pan (6-oz), which doubles as my eating dish when not trout-occupied.

just my 2¢


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23 replies since Jan. 16 2013, 2:21 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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