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Topic: New to backpackin, Need some advise on what to buy< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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TomC103 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 11:57 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi everybody I'm new to backpacking and to the forum and I would like some advise on what to buy for backpacking. I live in the uk.

This is the gear I have at the moment:

2-3 season synthetic sleeping bag 1900g
2 man tent 2000g
Cheap 40 litre backpack 1300g
Chinese pocket rocket knock off
Cheap torch
Swiss Army knife
Closed cell foam sleeping bag

What other gear do I need or what gear needs upgrading? I don't have loads of money to spend. Thanks for the help
Tom
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SW Mtn backpacker Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 12:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It helps to keep things simple, especially for 3-season hiking in regular weather (note: winter will likely require more complicated choices).  

Knowing your sleeping bag's expected temperature rating is a must (if new, think European sleeping bags must state EN ratings, while only suggested for American sleeping bags).  Later, a "do-it-yourself' quilt may be in your future for warmer conditions since you posted in the UL forum (some ideas are on the internet).  

Clothing is important, so a waterproof breathable jacket, fleece jacket, and wicking layers if you do not have one yet.  

Some additional items: Small first aid kit (maybe some bandages), personal hygiene kit (take from home), some small diameter lines to further secure your tent in windy conditions, water storage and/or water treatment if taking water from streams and rivers.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 12:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Google "ten essentials" to learn about recommendations for safety and survival gear, you definitely want to cover off on these areas. You have some of that covered already but not nearly enough.

Forget the weight of your sleeping bag, what is the packed size? Synthetics take up a ton of space, you might want to consider down to pack smaller.

Last bit of advice is, I know you don't have a ton of money, but try to not skimp on something thinking you can get by with it for now. If you go into purchasing something with that viewpoint then there probably is a reason (something about the product that you are rationalizing), which often will lead you to realize shortly after using it a few times that it really isn't right for you, and then you go out and buy what you really need. That costs you more because you end up buying twice -- so, my suggestion is to stretch your budget now as best you can to get what you really think is what you will need for the long haul, you will end up saving money that way.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 1:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Rent and go on a trip or two before you start to buy gear.

When you do buy, spend the bucks on the sleeping bag and pad, tent, pack, and boots. They must fit you (pack and boots) and work for the environment you're hiking in, be comfortable, and suit your own needs.

If I knew then what I know now I would have bought the down bag for $500 and tried on shoes until I found the right ones instead of "eh, it sort of fits" and hiking painful miles. I would have not even bothered with four of the tents I've had. I'd probably still have gone through four painful backpacks until I found the right one, but I have an awkward back size, right between small and medium, and it's hard when all the internal frames have different internal frames, and not all of them will fit your body shape.

Lots of kitchen gear you can get next to free, make a stove out of a can and use hard ziploc containers for cups, bowls, and get a grease pot at the dime store to boil water in. A plastic spoon is light and works. A pocket knife can be had for less than twenty bucks. All kinds of cheap light items work for backpacking - a micro fiber towel meant to be a car rag can be a pack towel.

If you can sleep on them, CCF pads work fine for three season and cost less than twenty bucks.

Experience will school you - and god help you if you turn into a gear-aholic like some of us. Then it will be a pack for every occasion, a series of tents that work for specific trips or seasons, and more hiking clothing than the stuff you wear to work.

Some of us wear the outdoor clothing to work too.


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All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 4:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks a lot for the advise and I'm in the uk and can't find a grease pot or anything similar so I was going to buy this Aluminium solo cookset what do you think?
Also I need a backpack what size do you recommend I was thinking about 40 litres.
For a tent I was going to buy this Gelert one man
Once I get some gear together I'm going to take it night fishing for a night to try it out.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 5:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Looks like you have a good start.  Before you blow all kinds of money on gear, get out there and use what you have to figure out what pieces you really need to upgrade.

Have you thought about water filtration and first aid?

The cookset you're looking at is fine.  

The tent you have is probably just as good as the one you're looking to buy and not much weight cutting--so skip it.

If there's a place to focus on upgrading it's probably your sleeping bag--being cold all night sucks.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 21 2013, 5:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I find my sleeping bag warm enough so I'm not going to buy another one yet but it is very bulky so that will be the reason I do upgrade.
I'm going to put together a small first aid kit from another first aid kit so no money needs to be spent there. What do I need in it bandages,
plasters(band-aids), alcohol wipes?
I'm not doing water filtration at the moment because I'm only going to go on one night fishing trips for now and then once I have the gear then I will start backpacking properly however where I night fish I walk about a mile to get there so I can get the feel of things. What do you recommend for water filtration?
I don't have a backpack so I need to buy one what size do you recommend?
Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 23 2013, 1:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For water filtration, the Sawyer Squeeze is simple, light and relatively cheap. I don't take Sawyer's included water bags on the trail with me (they're prone to leak); I use a couple Platypus bladders rigged up as a gravity filter system - one for dirty water, one for clean. They're quite  bit more durable & weigh only an oz or two more.
Before you buy a pack, I'd suggest getting all your gear together & taking it to your local outdoor store so you can ensure you select a pack with the appropriate room for all your stuff, and so you can ensure it fits you comfortably. A comfortable ride should by your primary concern as soon as you know what size you'll need.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 23 2013, 4:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(okmtbr @ Jan. 23 2013, 1:33 pm)
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For water filtration, the Sawyer Squeeze is simple, light and relatively cheap. I don't take Sawyer's included water bags on the trail with me (they're prone to leak); I use a couple Platypus bladders rigged up as a gravity filter system - one for dirty water, one for clean. They're quite  bit more durable & weigh only an oz or two more.
Before you buy a pack, I'd suggest getting all your gear together & taking it to your local outdoor store so you can ensure you select a pack with the appropriate room for all your stuff, and so you can ensure it fits you comfortably. A comfortable ride should by your primary concern as soon as you know what size you'll need.

Ok thanks
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