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Topic: What size backpack?, What size backpack for 3 day 2 nights?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:29 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

What size backpack for a 3 day hike or to take night fishing for 1 night?
I pack quite light
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The one that holds all your gear for that 3 day hike.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've found that most newcomers to backpacking buy packs that are too large and then tend to fill them up.  I was once guilty of that myself.  I'm using a 48 liter pack now and it forces me to pack lighter.  My .02 worth.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't have all my gear yet and I'm probably going to order online so I was looking for a guide
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ataylor @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:46 pm)
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I've found that most newcomers to backpacking buy packs that are too large and then tend to fill them up.  I was once guilty of that myself.  I'm using a 48 liter pack now and it forces me to pack lighter.  My .02 worth.

How long do you go on hikes for? I was thinking about getting a 45 but I wasn't sure if it would be too big. Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You should purchase all your gear first and the backpack last. Depending on your budget and gear "desires", your pack needs will range in size drastically.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 1:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:50 pm)
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You should purchase all your gear first and the backpack last. Depending on your budget and gear "desires", your pack needs will range in size drastically.

Ok thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 2:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TomC103 @ Jan. 22 2013, 10:51 am)
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(Tigger @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:50 pm)
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You should purchase all your gear first and the backpack last. Depending on your budget and gear "desires", your pack needs will range in size drastically.

Ok thanks

Yes, people's gear choices are just too variable and then there's whatever the weather is going to be: a 3 day gear set for a summer weekend in the Sierra being a lot different than a winter 3days in Michigan..... and a synthetic (bulkier) bag, two person tent or just a tarp etc. etc.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 3:50 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:50 pm)
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You should purchase all your gear first and the backpack last. Depending on your budget and gear "desires", your pack needs will range in size drastically.

Specifically, once you have your gear take all of it to a place like REI and spend time filling packs of different potential sizes to see what works.

That can also be a good exercise in forcing you to re-examine what you really need to take and what you can leave behind.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 4:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'll second JRinGeorgia - take your gear with you to a store and test fit some packs.

Also note the different suspension styles and belt/harness configurations. You will find that bags of the same size of same, or different,  manufacturers are a world of difference.

My pack is a 70L Osprey Aether. I have a daypack that is around 30L and it works well too.

That having been said, if you pack "light" I would look in the 40-50L range. That is where my next pack will fall. As I decrease the bulk (and weight) of my gear the 70L becomes a bigger and bigger pack. At 6.5lbs or so for the pack alone I can shave a couple lbs or more with a smaller/lighter pack that still has the capacity I need.

You don't want to over-load packs. Stick to the design specs as best you can. I have gone outside of that before on the high end with my 70L pack, and it worked, but pack comfort drastically drops the further off the upper spec limit for weight you get. It has to do with the way the suspension is designed to be able to distribute the weight over your body.

There are some packs that have the mesh hip belts. These are great for summer time because they vent real well. However, these are the ones you have to be careful of weight with the most - they are NOT designed to carry "loads". If you are going to get close to the limit of what one can hold, get a more robust pack. The durability will be better and your body will thank you later.

So in short - my advice is to start with a pack that holds your gear and you are within the design specs. After that you will have a base line to go off of in future gear selection and pack selection.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 4:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(KC8QVO @ Jan. 22 2013, 2:14 pm)
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..That having been said, if you pack "light" I would look in the 40-50L range. ..

If you are interested in lightweight packing, this is probably the size you want to look for (can double as a winter daypack too).   Some sub- ultralighters can get down to 18L (say, an 18L REI Flash) but that requires some experience.  Most of us (sadly) need more than one pack (it's a need mind you, not a want).

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 4:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Ok thanks a lot you are all very helpful
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 4:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd say somewhere between 55L and 70L depending on your gear and amount of food you bring.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 4:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a new 50L and I have spent the last 2 weeks stripping out things that are redundant redundancies and "Why the hell am I carrying this?"

I like the idea of taking a big box of stuff to a store and packing some bags. I wish I had of thought of that.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 5:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use a 3800ci (62L) Granite Gear Latitude Vapor for everything....overnite to 14 dayers.  Weighs 2lb 6oz.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 5:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The difference in weight carried/pack size needed for a 2 -3 day trip vs. going out for a week is all about food volume -  the rest is all the same gear. I agree with above, after assembling your big 4 - sleeping bag, tent, pad, and kitchen - take all to  your local REI type store and see what things all weigh and thus what size backpack fits your needs best.
BTW, will you be carrying a bear can?

After all is said and done, try packs in the 48 - 60 liter range. Be aware that many smaller packs cannot carry anything above 30 pounds comfortably. A slightly larger pack may fit your need better. You can always pack less, (not fill it up), and still have options available when you go out longer.

FYI, I carry a 60 size - (4-pounds), hike where cans are required, and go out for 10+ days at a time fishing in my Sierra. My all-up weight is usually less than 35 pounds.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 5:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(markskor @ Jan. 22 2013, 5:23 pm)
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The difference in weight carried/pack size needed for a 2 -3 day trip vs. going out for a week is all about food volume -  the rest is all the same gear. I agree with above, after assembling your big 4 - sleeping bag, tent, pad, and kitchen - take all to  your local REI type store and see what things all weigh and thus what size backpack fits your needs best.
BTW, will you be carrying a bear can?

After all is said and done, try packs in the 48 - 60 liter range. Be aware that many smaller packs cannot carry anything above 30 pounds comfortably. A slightly larger pack may fit your need better. You can always pack less, (not fill it up), and still have options available when you go out longer.

FYI, I carry a 60 size - (4-pounds), hike where cans are required, and go out for 10+ days at a time fishing in my Sierra. My all-up weight is usually less than 35 pounds.

No I don't need a bear can I live in the uk thanks for the advise I'm going to get my gear together first and then decide what size I need.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 6:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You mentioned fishing, although I'm not sure if you're thinking of fishing at night and hauling your fishing gear (and other needed gear) back and forth, or whether you're packing in, setting up camp, and then fishing.  If the first, anything you end up with for a 3 day/2 night stay should be ample.  

But if you're talking about an overnight fishing trip, the fishing gear you take really becomes important.  In particular, any wading gear (esp. wading boots) is where the volume goes up.  I always take special boots as that's no place to break a leg, and if I can wade wet, up to 3 days, it's the same pack I'd use for a non-fishing trip, just a little less trim.  If weather or water conditions say more gear (waders, insulation that I must anticipate getting wet) I go to a biger pack.

If backpacking to fish, include that gear in your trip to the store.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 22 2013, 10:55 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've got a larger pack for a few reasons.
1. When I was buying stuff, I was a complete noob and didnt know better.
2. I have some bulky stuff. My sleeping bag is synthetic and pretty bulky. I have a hammock and tarp which take up more space than, say, a tarptent. I have to use an underquilt if it's below 60 or so... more bulk than a typical inflatable pad.
3. When I was buying my pack, my wife was helping, and she told me, "get the 75L pack, its the same price as the 65L one, that's 10 liters for FREE!"

So my pack is big, but it means its not stuffed to bursting, and it doesnt have crap hanging off it or strapped to the outside. I went on a hike with a group once, and this one lady with a 40L pack literally had six bags swinging in the breeze around her, like a traveling peddler. I'm moving to down stuff, less weight, less bulk...

Grab all your crap, go down to the store, and tell the dude, "I need a pack I can fit all this in, and still have room for food."


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 23 2013, 9:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TomC103 @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:49 pm)
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(ataylor @ Jan. 22 2013, 1:46 pm)
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I've found that most newcomers to backpacking buy packs that are too large and then tend to fill them up.  I was once guilty of that myself.  I'm using a 48 liter pack now and it forces me to pack lighter.  My .02 worth.

How long do you go on hikes for? I was thinking about getting a 45 but I wasn't sure if it would be too big. Thanks

I usually go out for a long weekend, although I could carry enough for a week if I chose my clothes and food carefully.  I agree with the folks who've told you to get your gear together and visit a shop like REI for help in choosing a pack.  They'll also make sure you buy a pack that fits you and that's very important.  Good luck!
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 23 2013, 11:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all the advise
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