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Topic: Any water filter recommendations?, Lighter than my 14oz Sweetwater< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 10:34 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Seeing if I can replace my Sweetwater with something lighter.  I've resisted until now because I prefer filtered water over chemicals and like the way the Sweetwater operates, but it's become a heavy luxury.

For those of you who use filters, what are you using that you'd recommend?

Note that I don't always have trees available for hanging gravity systems and I don't use a bladder.  I also need something field-serviceable since turbid water's common.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 10:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sawyer Squeeze would meet your needs/wants pretty well. http://www.rei.com/product/837824/sawyer-squeeze-water-filter

Well under 14oz, the link says "field weight of 3oz".  I'm guessing that's the filter with the smallest bag, maybe?  Either way, lighter than your current setup.  

It's field-serviceable (comes with a syringe to backwash any sediment), filters the water fairly quickly, and you can drink directly from the sport's cap (not my preference) or squeeze it into your water bottle(s).  Plus the price compares well to the competition.  I highly recommend it!

ETA: I just read that the filter is 3oz, the middle bag is like 0.5oz, and the syringe is 1.1oz, so you're closer to 5oz.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 10:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

MSR Hyperflow has been working well for me for the last 3 years.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 11:32 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I replaced my MSR Sweetwater with a Sawyer Squeeze and am quite happy with it.  Two caveats are:
1. Some have complained about the bags failing so either carry a spare or use it gently.  Mine are holding up OK so far.
2. Don't let it freeze.  Keep it in a pocket and take it in your sleeping bag with you if it is below freezing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 11:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Any experience on either the Hyperflow or the Sawyer with cloudy/turbid water?  And how easily they're cleaned in the field if they get clogged?

From what I understand, both of these filters use this hollow tube filters and the reviews I've read seem to indicate that these get clogged easily and are hard to backflush/unclog.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 11:54 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Something to keep in mind TF is that you don't need a tree for gravity filters. They can be hung from a boulder or a trekking pole or stick shoved into a crack in rocks, or spanning two rocks.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 12:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use katadyn hiker pro. My concern with sawyer squeeze filter is getting water from small puddles in an emergency. I have had times when I needed water desperately and with my hiker pro I was able to pump clean fresh water easily from a small murky puddle. Try that with a Sawyer squeeze filter. I'm sure the sawyer is great when u have an abundance of water, such a fast flowing stream or a pond or lake...just something else to consider and make your desicion a little tougher.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 12:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Jan. 28 2013, 11:54 am)
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Something to keep in mind TF is that you don't need a tree for gravity filters. They can be hung from a boulder or a trekking pole or stick shoved into a crack in rocks, or spanning two rocks.

Good point.  I just need to think the scenerio through, I think.  How do you handle turbid water with a gravity setup?  I want to make sure what whatever I have will work with Lake Michigan and Colorado River water -- both can be pretty murky/sandy/turbid and often need to settle.  For a gravity system, would I first settle the water, then transfer it to the feed/dirty water bag?

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 12:36 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(GottaGamble @ Jan. 28 2013, 12:17 pm)
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I use katadyn hiker pro. My concern with sawyer squeeze filter is getting water from small puddles in an emergency.

Yeah, I've done that, too.

I worry about murky water, in general, when the system feeds the filter from the *bottom* of the dirty water container, like the Sawyer squeeze and gravity systems.  My usual practice (up to now, anyway) is to either carefully draw from the top of a pothole or a container where the water has been settling.  Taking from the bottom of the container would mean having two dirty water containers and transferring, I think...


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 1:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ Jan. 28 2013, 12:28 pm)
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Good point.  I just need to think the scenerio through, I think.  How do you handle turbid water with a gravity setup?  I want to make sure what whatever I have will work with Lake Michigan and Colorado River water -- both can be pretty murky/sandy/turbid and often need to settle.  For a gravity system, would I first settle the water, then transfer it to the feed/dirty water bag?

Yes, for Colorado river water, I'd use a collapsible bucket as a settling basin before filtering.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 28 2013, 1:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

They say a picture is worth a thousand words.

This is the Red River, so named for its always-silt laden water. It is a Platypus unit there, but the Sawyer is even better at it, plus is easier to clean.

Email or PM me if you are interested in a few different systems, one only used on one trip.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 10:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the suggestions and feedback.  I'm starting to realize that this may be one of those situations where I'm not going to find a single solution.

I have a hike coming up at the Grand Canyon this spring with no less than 5 nights at the Colorado river, away from other water sources, so I need a reliable system for those conditions.  I asked the same question to a group of GC hikers and, at least for that environment, I think I've ruled out the "hollow tube" type of filters.  My Sweetwater has only failed me once at the Canyon but I think that I could have avoided that with a little more care.  For this trip, I may even go *heavier* and get a Miniworks -- I hadn't realized that it's that much more robust than the Sweetwater -- or at least pick up the MSR "Silt Stopper" for the Sweetwater.

So, for the Canyon, I guess I'm going to have to find my weight-savings elsewhere.

In the meantime, I really like the sounds of the Sawyer.  And Ray, I'm going to take you up on your offer and contact you offline about gravity systems.  We have an early summer family backcountry river trip planned and that would be perfect.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 10:33 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

TF definitely get a collapsible bucket for the GC trip to allow you to let your water sit for a while before then pouring into a gravity rig, or just drawing from in the case of pump-style filters. (Keep the pickup above the bottom, personally I would decant to another container for even them.)

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 10:41 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ Jan. 29 2013, 10:12 am)
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Thanks for the suggestions and feedback.  I'm starting to realize that this may be one of those situations where I'm not going to find a single solution.

I have a hike coming up at the Grand Canyon this spring with no less than 5 nights at the Colorado river, away from other water sources, so I need a reliable system for those conditions.  I asked the same question to a group of GC hikers and, at least for that environment, I think I've ruled out the "hollow tube" type of filters.  My Sweetwater has only failed me once at the Canyon but I think that I could have avoided that with a little more care.  For this trip, I may even go *heavier* and get a Miniworks -- I hadn't realized that it's that much more robust than the Sweetwater -- or at least pick up the MSR "Silt Stopper" for the Sweetwater.

So, for the Canyon, I guess I'm going to have to find my weight-savings elsewhere.

In the meantime, I really like the sounds of the Sawyer.  And Ray, I'm going to take you up on your offer and contact you offline about gravity systems.  We have an early summer family backcountry river trip planned and that would be perfect.

TF,

I hike throughout Michigan as well as going down into the smokies, and occasionally out west.

With all the silt in our local waters, I got the MSR Miniworks as I can easily scrape it clean and return it to full flow.  A week along the Pigeon river near Grayling MI I think would have killed most filters, but I just scraped mine twice a day, and just kept on going.

I've had this filter now for nearly 10 years, and its been a solid piece of gear, that never stays home.  Heck, at 1lb, I consider it worth it to carry on every day hike even.  Its been loaned out to countless people having issues with their filters, and every time I consider replacing it for something lighter, I always come back to how solid its been in some of the ugliest water around.

Not the answer you are looking for I'm sure, but one thats been around the same blocks in your neighborhood.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 11:14 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Jan. 29 2013, 10:33 am)
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TF definitely get a collapsible bucket for the GC trip to allow you to let your water sit for a while before then pouring into a gravity rig, or just drawing from in the case of pump-style filters. (Keep the pickup above the bottom, personally I would decant to another container for even them.)

I do have one that I used to always take. My routine is to bucket some as soon as I got to camp, then filter it at dinner time.  Then bucket some before at night to filter the next morning.  I usually propped up the bucket against a rock or tied off the handles up to a bush to keep it from tipping over at night.  But, on one trip, I ended up with "floaters" (drowned mice) on two of the mornings.  BLECH.  So, now, I take pleated containers that I can close.  Some people use ziplock bags but I can be a klutz with those.

I always settle water from the Colorado.  I have maybe a dozen nights when I had no other source than the Colorado and have only had major problems on one of them with my Sweetwater.  I do carry a little alum with me in case I find "cement" after a rain, but I've never had to use it.  But I've heard the horror stories and sometimes wonder if I've just been really, really lucky.

I remember a weeklong float trip on the Green River through Canyonlands.  It was June in a very low water year and, wow, was that water silty.  We were a big group (private trip) and systematically destroyed everyone's filters.  We were reduced to melted ice water in our coolers by the last night... tasted like a combination of plastic and water-logged food.  That was fun.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 11:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ Jan. 29 2013, 10:14 am)
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on one trip, I ended up with "floaters" (drowned mice) on two of the mornings.  BLECH.  So, now, I take pleated containers that I can close.  Some people use ziplock bags but I can be a klutz with those.

This works well to keep crud out of the water while it sits.

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews....strella


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 12:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(rayestrella @ Jan. 29 2013, 11:17 am)
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This works well to keep crud out of the water while it sits.

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews....strella

My favorite, after trying a few different containers, is the 48oz Nalgene "canteen".   I like the tall skinny containers because it's easier to pump from them without stirring up the sediment on the bottom.  But your Platypus carrier looks interesting... looks easy to fill, close then prop it up on it's side to settle, then pump out of the smaller pour opening.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 29 2013, 12:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(booyah @ Jan. 29 2013, 10:41 am)
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With all the silt in our local waters, I got the MSR Miniworks as I can easily scrape it clean and return it to full flow.  A week along the Pigeon river near Grayling MI I think would have killed most filters, but I just scraped mine twice a day, and just kept on going.

I've had this filter now for nearly 10 years, and its been a solid piece of gear, that never stays home.  Heck, at 1lb, I consider it worth it to carry on every day hike even.  Its been loaned out to countless people having issues with their filters, and every time I consider replacing it for something lighter, I always come back to how solid its been in some of the ugliest water around.

Yeah, pretty much echos what I've been hearing.  "It will pump anything".

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 02 2013, 2:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

20 years ago I bought the MSR waterworks for an extended trip to Belize and Guatemala. I filtered all my drinking water with it for nearly 9 months, from very questionable water sources.  Except for the slow flow rate, I never had trouble, even though I put hundreds of gallons through it.  Since then I've only used it periodically, and should probably replace it with something a little lighter and more modern but I am now (and will probably always be) a true believer.

For anyone who absolutely relies on their filter to produce drinkable, safe water from everything from debris clogged rivers to muddy puddles - I'd trust the MSR brand.

*your mileage may vary
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 02 2013, 3:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I had a lot of good trips with a Katadyn Hiker Pro before I switched to chemicals. Dependable and well built, and relatively lightweight. That said, if you can make a gravity system work they're definitely tempting.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 02 2013, 5:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have thus far found the Sawyer Squeeze to clog way less than my MSR Sweetwater did.  It really wasn't a big issue with the Sweetwater though, when it clogged, a few swipes with the brush took care of it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 03 2013, 3:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I found the MSR waterworks to clog allot on my Canadian Rockies hikes.  One place a fellow hiker borrowed it, and I had to beg him for some of the little water he got to clean it with.

On the other hand I had no problem with my Kayatdyn water bottle filter.

I think the difference is the Kayatdyn pore size is larger, but small enough for cysts.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 03 2013, 6:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I love my Sweetewater.  Good water, always.  Worth the weight.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 04 2013, 1:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For the last couple of decades, I've used the Timberline Eagle Water Filter to great success, ($26 complete, 6 oz weight.)

I replace the filter every year and I've used it to suck water out of deep cattle footprints in the Grand Gulch. This is all you need.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2013, 1:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used a Sweetwater for 1 trip. It was late fall and the streams were boggy such that you kept sinking deeper and deeper the longer you stood there... and the filter was slow! That winter I purchased a Platypua gravity system for AT hike. I am still using the initial filter after completing 600 miles of trail and let me tell you... it is great. There are some instances where water is 0.5 to 2mi away from where you end up camping for the night. The platypus has a 4L clean and a 4l dirty bag. I would fill both and have a full 8l of water for evening and morning use. And it is only 11oz which includes the durable 4l clean bag which is also my "water bottle". And now to the main point, it is so convenient, you only have to dunk the dirty bag in (a few seconds) and then you can stand up and complete the filtering operation. That is a blessing for my back as well. No pumping. No mess. And the flexibe "bottle" packs in any corner of your pack ( I would carry 1-1.5L during the day. Also, having a bag lets you capture water from a tiny mountainside dripping stream were a pump likes a little more water depth to work easily. All in all, I am sold on the platypus system.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 09 2013, 1:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm weight concious, but very health concious. Health is priceless and I've friends who've fought giardia for over 6 months. About 15 years ago I bought a Katydyn Pocket filter for $260.00. IMHO, I'm not trusting of the cheaper units. Doctors and illness cost lots of time and money.
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