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Topic: Frogg Toggs raingear - or something else?, Best value in lightweight raingear< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 1:33 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Its time to get new rain gear. Frogg Toggs has an attractive price and claims to breathe.
But how heavy is it? I can't find a weight on a whole suit. AND how durable is it?  Will it hold up to weeks on the trail with a loaded pack?

Any other rain gear suggestions?

I day hike and do multiday hikes/camping quite often. I like versatility and durability......
Thanks!


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 5:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Three of us took them on a 5 day backpack trip to AK a few years ago. None of use brought them back with us. Duct tape is a good thing to have with Frogg Toggs

They are basically one time/trip use rain gear. They will tear easily.  They are very light and work pretty well for what they are.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 8:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, they're definitely light.  I actually have one that's maybe 5 years old. I took it on good weather/desert trips when I wasn't expecting rain, so I've only worn it once or twice.  Durability isn't an issue when it mostly sits in your pack... but mine only weighed about 5oz, so it was good for that.  I doubt that it would hold up for "weeks on the trail with a loaded pack" but do you really hike that regularly with your rain jacket on, day in and day out? (I never have but I'm not a winter backpacker.)

So, yes, they're light, 5-6 oz depending on size.  They breathe well but the fabric is pretty stiff, in a Tyvek-like way, and the sizes run huge.  (Mine reminds me of the rain jackets that football players wear on the sidelines, sized to fit over their pads.)  They're also really bulky, which is why I don't pack it anymore.

LOTS of rain gear options out there.  Depends on how much you're willing to spend and how light/waterproof/breathable you need.  You can get good deals on Marmot Precips right now.  If you're willing to spend more, I think the First Ascent (Eddie Bauer) BC-200 jacket is a great jacket for its specs, construction and price.  I have a hybrid soft-shell that uses the same fabric and it's as nice a membrane-fabric as I've ever seen.
http://www.eddiebauer.com/catalog/product.jsp?ensembleId=37035


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 8:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Unlike eggs, I've used my Dri Ducks (the lightest version of Frogg Toggs) for 3 week-long trips in the mountains and a few shorter ones down low. The wrist is torn up a bit on one arm but they've held up pretty well considering how fragile they are. I know their limitations and use my trekking poles to keep briars and such away when I'm bushwhacking. If you're sticking mostly to trails that aren't overgrown they should last a decent while and they're cheap enough to replace each year if needed. I don't get out a lot (and have been blessed with fairly decent weather when I do) so I've had mine coming on 4 years now. I should add I don't normally wear the pants unless it's also cold. They may get torn up more if I did, but the cuffs on the jacket see the most abuse from me, and I'm not concerned about that though it could cause cold hands I suppose.

I tore the jacket up fairly well feeding a huge brush pile into a chipper. So now with duct tape (and dirt) on the jacket my set is about 10.6 oz or so. New they were 9.7 for the set. Frogg Toggs are a bit thicker but the propore material is still the most breathable of any waterproof material used for rainwear. I use it for a wind jacket as well, but it's still about 5 x LESS breathable than a Houdini. It's also the lightest except for the new breathable cuben, but it's MUCH less expensive.

They are also sized pretty large. A medium feels like an XL to me, but I still went with it so I could wear all my layers underneath. I've heard of people ripping out the seam in the pants (they're welded, not sewn). Don't see how that could happen as big as they are unless they are either huge or got a smaller size than they should have.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 8:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No real suggestions as there is a lot of choices, most very good, depending on your wallet.

What size(s) are you? Between gear I test and others I buy myself to review I have a ton of extra WPB rain shells. I am happy to let some go cheap if you are interested.

Since you are new you can look here for an idea of what I do on the side. ;-)

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/tester_reviews/rayestrella

Each review has an email address. Feel free to email me.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 5:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So far very impressed with my golite rain gear, but to be honest i've barely had a chance to use it. I picked up the Tumalo which offers pitzips at 10 oz

http://www.golite.com/Ms-Tumalo-Trinity-25-Layer-Jacket-P46755.aspx

But if you need lighter still there is the pit-zip-less Malpais at 7 oz

http://www.golite.com/Ms-Malp....05.aspx

And for pants at 7 oz

http://www.golite.com/Ms-Tumalo-Trinity-25-Layer-Pant-P46756.aspx

I am 5'8 165 lbs and the medium fits perfect - roomy enough to put over some layers but not bulky.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 30 2013, 9:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've had and used the original FroggToggs rainsuit since soon after they became available.  I also have a new version rainsuit as yet untested and a heavier model jacket that is great for non-backpacking wear.  They are by far my favorite rain/wind protection.  The original jacket is looking a little worn, and one wrist is damaged by getting too near a cooking stove flame,-- the material melts easily, but it is still water- and wind- proof.  I prefer FroggToggs over any other rain/wind  shell.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 02 2013, 2:46 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

durability for Froggs seems to be an issue.... hmmmmm. Thanks all.

I 'm  now thinking about going back to the good old Poncho for warm weather hiking. Kelty has one. light weight nylon. multipurpose. covers the pack.... any thoughts?


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 07 2013, 2:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Panchos have there bad side... flap in the wind and marginal usability for arms.

Panchos seem to have there good side... backpack cover, tent footprint (or survival shelter if you like that route) and small tarp for getting out of bad weather when cooking.

If you are an ultralite person then maybe a pancho is for you.

I use a pair of pants and a jacket that also serve as another layer in my layering system... especially in winter.
I am now using Cabelas Gortex rain pants at 12oz for rain pants in summer and an insulation, wind, snow/mud gaiters. They are tough having hiked 100's of miles in them through brush & woods in winter. I also have a Field & Stream 11oz rain pant but they do not breath as well.

As far as a jacket is converned, I am still not happy with the various items I have used in the past dur to lack of breating, even in winter. The lightest (and my current default) is a Red Ledge 14oz hooded jacket. I tried and discarded the newer design of Frogg Togs Toad-Z Rage at 19oz as being to heavy and bulky and even less breathable than the Red Ledge although it is certainly durable and has plenty of pockets. I am considering going to Cabellas and looking for a matching Gortex vented jacket but it would have to be less than 14oz to consider it.
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