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Topic: Does anyone have a fabric sand/snow stake?, Looking for specs.< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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DaveG Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 3:53 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I decided to try and make some fabric sand/snow stakes. After an Internet search, I settled on something like the Sierra Designs sand/snow stake (center in the pic below). I made a prototype -- basically a stuff sack with a webbing bridle (left in the pic below). Another common variation is like the REI fabric stake (right in the pic below).

But I have no experience with fabric stakes and couldn't find any specifications online. If anyone has one, can you give me any information about the dimensions and type of fabric?

The one I made has an 8" diameter and is 12" tall. The bridle is 3/4" webbing 15" long with a D-ring at the end. The fabric is 1.9 oz PU coated ripstop nylon. Total weight is 1.5 oz.

I tried it out in the snow and it seems to work okay. But the "sack" seems like it may be taller than necessary. And maybe the diameter should be bigger. I also have no idea whether the fabric is strong enough. And I wonder how good the style I chose is compared to other variations.

Just looking for feedback before I make another. Thanks.


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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 4:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

my Exped sand anchors are 8" square, made from coated nylon.
I have used them on snow and sand and yes they work.
The trick is to bury them deep enough so that the snow or sand on top has enough weight to keep them buried.
That is how a "dead man" anchor works.
Just in case you use them on snow, you stomp on the snow after you bury them but you need to make sure you have a tool to dig them out with the next morning .
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 4:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Franco @ Feb. 24 2013, 4:20 pm)
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my Exped sand anchors are 8" square, made from coated nylon.

Mine aren't as fancy, but that's about the right size.  (They just have tie loops at the corners.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 9:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, it looks like the anchor I made is a bit of overkill, at least for a backpacking tent.

Franco and big load -- can you descibe how you set your anchors? Any general rule as to how deep is deep enough in sand and snow? I assume you want the anchor to remain as flat as possible. Do you use a bridle between the anchor and tent guy line/stake loop to prevent the anchor from folding up?

Thanks.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 10:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Dave
I shot a video clip a couple of weeks ago that shows how it's done :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v....index=3
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 24 2013, 10:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've only used them in sand.  I buried them 10"-12" deep.  They seemed secure enough, although they weren't tested  by any major winds.  You'll probably get a feel for it pretty quickly.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 27 2013, 11:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used to carry various bag-contraptions around for snow-sand anchors, but It got to be too much trouble, (like digging a 1 foot deep hole for each stake,) so I tied an 8" diameter nylon loop into each of my shelter's stakeloops, and now I just put a piece of driftwood or firewood through each nylon loop, and stack rocks on top of the wood.

For the extremely rare instances when there is no wood or rocks available, I carry a few high-quality gallon zip-lock bags, which I loosely pack with sand or snow, roll them up tight, insert them into the nylon loops, and twist many times until they are tightly bound, then bury them.

I'm a mountain climber, and this simple arrangment has worked fine countless times for me in high winds above treeline.

Don't overengineer it...your not climbing K-2.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 28 2013, 12:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If the snow is deep enough to put a snow anchor in, I find you can simply tie off some parachute cord to a block of snow and use it alone. I also bury sticks (a one foot stick buried underground is amazing). I don't even bring stakes in winter anymore at all. I just rely on rocks, snow blocks and sticks. I've used these methods in relatively extreme conditions (100 +mph winds last spring). The shelter in my avatar was in 40+ mph winds with 60 mph gusts just using sticks shoved in the snow.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 28 2013, 12:30 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would rather use wood or rocks, too, when they are available, which for me is most of the time.  I don't carry sand anchors very often.
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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 28 2013, 7:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just have several 8" stuff sacks that I put other stuff in* while packed and hiking but empty in camp. Loop the pull cord through a tent loop, fill with snow or sand and bury. Or add a length of cord between the 2 to get deeper. It's worked fine for years.

*Although not all get used and they're light and compact enough (and cheap) to just bundle the "extras" together in an outside pocket.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 01 2013, 3:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I have a tendency to over engineer/over think things.

I made three versions of a fabric sand/snow anchor. Tried them out in the snow. All seemed to hold about the same and about the same as a 15" chunk of split wood. If anything, the flat version (far right in the photo) worked a bit better.

So, an informative experiment. I can see how making do with something found at the campsite or something less intricate would work just as well.


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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 01 2013, 4:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, it's still cool that you made the comparisons. If we don't experiment, we'll never discover new things. Thanks for sharing!

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