SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Page 1 of 212>>

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: camp chair and pad< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 10:43 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am in the market for a camp chair and pad. I am thinking all in one or a two piece set up.

Crazy Creek Hex Power lounger 2.0

or

Thermarest Pro Light Small with Compack Chair Kit

Any users of either please chime in
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
nogods Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6334
Joined: Sep. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 11:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I bought a $25 walmart hammock. I had a tailor cut it in half then sew a channel in each piece on the cut end. He charged me $10 for the project.  I'll use whoppie slings, carabiners and tree straps for the suspension.  Now I have two camp chairs that double as gear hammocks.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 11:27 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm curious as to how many of you actually carry some sort of camp chair while backpacking.  While I'll admit that it would be nice to have one in camp, the extra weight just doesn't seem like it would be worth it.  Especially with the emphasis on going light these days.  I can see it while canoeing, but backpacking - that's bit of a stretch.  For me anyway.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 11:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For 8 oz. I can turn a pad into a chair or use a chair that doubles as a pad. All of my gear is old early 90's. I would still be shaving weight off my current pad at 2.5 lbs. without the stuff sack.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
Buggyboo Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Guests
Posts: 1153
Joined: Feb. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 11:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Mar. 03 2013, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
I'm curious as to how many of you actually carry some sort of camp chair while backpacking.  While I'll admit that it would be nice to have one in camp, the extra weight just doesn't seem like it would be worth it.  Especially with the emphasis on going light these days.  I can see it while canoeing, but backpacking - that's bit of a stretch.  For me anyway.

Got my 3 day pack weight down to 27.5#s so no chair for this hiker. I'm with you Hikerjer.

--------------
"I'll give you my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hands"

Charlton Heston
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 12:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

my current pad weighs         1136g. 40.0 oz.  2.5 lbs.
power lounger hex 2.0           845g.  29.8 oz.  1.86 lbs.
therm a rest  system             501g.  17.7 oz.  1.1 lbs.

Weight alone the thermarest wins  how ever may get  punctured. So I geuss my question should be does anyone sleep on a Crazy Creek?
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12898
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 12:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Read this    Simple to make.  Cut the pattern with a soldering iron to seal the edges of the rip stop.  Make the pocket big enough for whatever sit pad you already carry.  Thing weighs about 3 ounces when it is finished.  You do need to reinforce some of the areas when using rip stop.  I added second layers of rip stop to the ends of the pockets where the trekking poles went, to keep the handles from poking through.

--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
rayestrella Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 6544
Joined: Nov. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 1:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This doesn't weigh much but you need to use something as a backrest.

http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews....strella


--------------
I measure happiness with an altimeter
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
TDale Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 15492
Joined: Jun. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 1:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have the equivalent from Pacific Outdoor Equipment.  I use it in tandem with my uninsulated air mattress for sleeping.  Nothing better for sitting around camp.

--------------
"Sure as I know anything, I know this - they will try again...They'll swing back to the belief that they can make people... better. And I do not hold to that. So no more runnin'. I aim to misbehave."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 10
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12014
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 4:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have quite a few stools and such of different models. In winter, I bring a stool on occasion. Most of the time, I just use my Z-Rest closed-cell foam pad if anything. Mind you, we usually have an abundance of logs to sit on and such so it's not as much of a concern as it may be in other places.

--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 11
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23869
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 4:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I just use a little Z-Lite seat, which doubles as part of my pillow (the rest is clothes).  I'm always on the lookout for other seat options, but I haven't seen anything that was worth the weight for me.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 5:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The option of the neo air and Jemba seat is


455g. 16.049 oz. 1 lbs. and 100 dollars more in cost.

although it may be best sleep yet.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
I must not be there yet, I keep hiking...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 5708
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 6:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hunk of blue ccf app. 1 x 2 feet - couple ounces, costs almost nothing.

I have a half-finished chair made of some old breathable ripstop I had sitting around - maybe I'll fix that up. But the CCF still works in alpine settings, and the hammock chair is only good when there are trees. And the CCF makes a good base for the stove when out in the snow so sometimes I take a second one for that.

Or I sit on a bear can, or a rock.


--------------
All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
     Friedrich Nietzsche
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
no_granola Search for posts by this member.
minor deity
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13174
Joined: Dec. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 6:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Bear Vault

--------------
I never imagined that being obnoxious would get me where I am today.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
retired reddog Search for posts by this member.
"I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference."  Robert Frost
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1374
Joined: Jun. 2007
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 8:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use a Crazy Creek power lounger and in my opinion it is well worth any weight penalty when it comes to counting ounces.  The ability to have an adjustable chair back to lean against whether sitting around relaxing watching the stars or sitting up reading in the tent is awesome.  Addtionally, when we break for lunch on the trail I just toss it out flat on the ground and catch a few Z's with no worries about putting a hole in a mattress.  Add to that the fact that it can be used as a sleeping mat on its own (too thin for me!) or to suplement or protect an air mattress and I don't go on the trail without it.  Again, that's just my humble opinion, but it goes on every trip with me.

--------------
Good night Chesty, where ever you are!-(It's a Marine thing.)

“The deadliest weapon in the world is a Marine and his rifle!”
General John Pershing, United States Army
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
ol-zeke Search for posts by this member.
Clear Creek
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12898
Joined: Sep. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 9:32 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It appears my link will not allow others to access it.  I will try to copy it below.  

Account below is by Jerry.

The Jerry Chair - An Ultralight Camp Chair
At the Linville Gorge Hang I debuted my ultralight camp chair. My aging back can’t stand to sit unsupported for very long, so I have been looking for a solution. I like to hang my hammock farther away from the campfire, so it won’t do as a chair in the evening, and the hammock chairs need trees to set up, which aren’t always close to the fire ring. All of the commercially available tripod style chairs weighed at least 16 oz. and are bulky.

What I came up with is a sling type chair which uses my trekking poles and sit pad, which I’m carrying anyway. The weight of this prototype is 3.5 oz. and uses a heavyweight awning fabric, just because that’s what I had laying around. It could be made from most any material, although I think this heavier material gives it a little structure.

Since it's just material it rolls up into a very small bundle.

It was immediately dubbed “the Jerry Chair”.

So here are the instructions to make your very own “Jerry Chair”. All it takes is a piece of material about 20” x 56”. The size isn’t too important. I was just winging it the night I made it.

https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery....=182617


--------------
Everything I know, I learned by doing it wrong at least twice.

"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 03 2013, 10:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That chair is slick Ol-Zeke that just might be my answer.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
Sanenomore Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13
Joined: Apr. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 4:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Mar. 03 2013, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
I'm curious as to how many of you actually carry some sort of camp chair while backpacking.  While I'll admit that it would be nice to have one in camp, the extra weight just doesn't seem like it would be worth it.  Especially with the emphasis on going light these days.  I can see it while canoeing, but backpacking - that's bit of a stretch.  For me anyway.

I carry the REI Flex Lite Chair 1lb 12 oz) and I make no apologies for it. I have never regretted having a chair in camp and personally I feel comfort trumps weight with in reason.

There is a faddish over-emphasis on the ultralight today (in my opinion) and while lighter gear is great, I see some people hiking with a mindset more like that of a marathon runner (farther/faster being the mantra). I'm not knocking that style of backpacking, but I personally go out to take in nature and get away from the hyper pace of life, so I am not trying to win a trail race when I go, and a few simple comforts increase my enjoyment greatly and truthfully haven't effected my overall hiking performance that much.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
tarpon6 Search for posts by this member.
swimswithtarpon
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 270
Joined: Feb. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I carry the Pack Stool. It weighs 14 oz. In Florida I always take it. There aren't many good spots to sit and I don't want to sit on the ground with all the fire ants around.  Every backpacking trip out west I consider leaving it behind to save myself 14 oz.  In the end I drag it along and am always glad I did.

--------------
“In the wilderness man learns to have faith in his Creator.”
     — Finis Mitchell
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 20
JRinGeorgia Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 597
Joined: Jul. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(no_granola @ Mar. 03 2013, 6:52 pm)
QUOTE
Bear Vault

+1

--------------
- JRinGeorgia
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
TrailScouter Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Nov. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Z-Lite seat does it for me.  It's light and easy to stow on the outside of my pack so it's easy to get to when I need it.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
markskor Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1231
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 9:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My bearikade and a small round scrap of ccf pad -  
FYI, the blue usually works best in my camp feng shui!


--------------
mountain man who swims with trout
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12014
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 10:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(tarpon6 @ Mar. 06 2013, 5:05 am)
QUOTE
I carry the Pack Stool. It weighs 14 oz. In Florida I always take it. There aren't many good spots to sit and I don't want to sit on the ground with all the fire ants around.  Every backpacking trip out west I consider leaving it behind to save myself 14 oz.  In the end I drag it along and am always glad I did.

When I do bring something to sit on in winter, the Roll-A-Chair is what I bring.

--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 24
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23869
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 12:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Sanenomore @ Mar. 06 2013, 4:55 am)
QUOTE

(hikerjer @ Mar. 03 2013, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
I'm curious as to how many of you actually carry some sort of camp chair while backpacking.  While I'll admit that it would be nice to have one in camp, the extra weight just doesn't seem like it would be worth it.  Especially with the emphasis on going light these days.  I can see it while canoeing, but backpacking - that's bit of a stretch.  For me anyway.

I carry the REI Flex Lite Chair 1lb 12 oz) and I make no apologies for it. I have never regretted having a chair in camp and personally I feel comfort trumps weight with in reason.

There is a faddish over-emphasis on the ultralight today (in my opinion) and while lighter gear is great, I see some people hiking with a mindset more like that of a marathon runner (farther/faster being the mantra). I'm not knocking that style of backpacking, but I personally go out to take in nature and get away from the hyper pace of life, so I am not trying to win a trail race when I go, and a few simple comforts increase my enjoyment greatly and truthfully haven't effected my overall hiking performance that much.

Not everyone who is conscious of weight falls into that category.  We weigh tradeoffs in weight allocation for other purposes, such as photography, fishing, climbing, snow travel, etc.   Many people with joint problems or other health issues also choose to go as light as possible.

I do a lot of desert backpacking, especially in the shoulder seasons, and I sometimes have to start my weight budget with 2-3 gallons of water.  Paying close attention to what the rest of my gear weighs is an important practical consideration with a direct bearing on comfort.  

It's fine with me if you want to carry a chair.  It's also fine with me if other people make other choices.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 25
Sanenomore Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13
Joined: Apr. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 4:33 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Mar. 06 2013, 12:47 pm)
QUOTE

(Sanenomore @ Mar. 06 2013, 4:55 am)
QUOTE

(hikerjer @ Mar. 03 2013, 11:27 am)
QUOTE
I'm curious as to how many of you actually carry some sort of camp chair while backpacking.  While I'll admit that it would be nice to have one in camp, the extra weight just doesn't seem like it would be worth it.  Especially with the emphasis on going light these days.  I can see it while canoeing, but backpacking - that's bit of a stretch.  For me anyway.

I carry the REI Flex Lite Chair 1lb 12 oz) and I make no apologies for it. I have never regretted having a chair in camp and personally I feel comfort trumps weight with in reason.

There is a faddish over-emphasis on the ultralight today (in my opinion) and while lighter gear is great, I see some people hiking with a mindset more like that of a marathon runner (farther/faster being the mantra). I'm not knocking that style of backpacking, but I personally go out to take in nature and get away from the hyper pace of life, so I am not trying to win a trail race when I go, and a few simple comforts increase my enjoyment greatly and truthfully haven't effected my overall hiking performance that much.

Not everyone who is conscious of weight falls into that category.  We weigh tradeoffs in weight allocation for other purposes, such as photography, fishing, climbing, snow travel, etc.   Many people with joint problems or other health issues also choose to go as light as possible.

I do a lot of desert backpacking, especially in the shoulder seasons, and I sometimes have to start my weight budget with 2-3 gallons of water.  Paying close attention to what the rest of my gear weighs is an important practical consideration with a direct bearing on comfort.  

It's fine with me if you want to carry a chair.  It's also fine with me if other people make other choices.

I agree with your post. Its a HYOH kinda thing, but I probably get a bit defensive of my style of hiking (I pay attention to weight too, just not at the cost of comfort) since I have been blasted several times by ultralighters telling me how to do it "the right way".
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
Buggyboo Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Guests
Posts: 1153
Joined: Feb. 2013
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 06 2013, 8:19 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(shaunkad @ Mar. 03 2013, 10:43 am)
QUOTE
I am in the market for a camp chair and pad. I am thinking all in one or a two piece set up.

Crazy Creek Hex Power lounger 2.0

or

Thermarest Pro Light Small with Compack Chair Kit

Any users of either please chime in

Thought of you when I got this in my email box today shaunkad;
http://www.trailspace.com/gear/alite/monarch-chair/#review27175


--------------
"I'll give you my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hands"

Charlton Heston
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
shaunkad Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 62
Joined: Apr. 2008
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 3:44 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The goal is to get two uses out of one item. Like trekking poles/tent poles.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
QCHIKER Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2360
Joined: Oct. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 8:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm willing to carry some extra weight so I can be comfortable so I carry a Thermarest chair kit and pad. After a long day bping I figure I deserve some comfort.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
rfahndrich Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 10:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use this from REI
http://www.rei.com/product/765283/rei-trail-stool
I really do not mind the extra weight.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
rfahndrich Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 07 2013, 10:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Mar. 03 2013, 9:32 pm)
QUOTE
It appears my link will not allow others to access it.  I will try to copy it below.  

Account below is by Jerry.

The Jerry Chair - An Ultralight Camp Chair
At the Linville Gorge Hang I debuted my ultralight camp chair. My aging back can’t stand to sit unsupported for very long, so I have been looking for a solution. I like to hang my hammock farther away from the campfire, so it won’t do as a chair in the evening, and the hammock chairs need trees to set up, which aren’t always close to the fire ring. All of the commercially available tripod style chairs weighed at least 16 oz. and are bulky.

What I came up with is a sling type chair which uses my trekking poles and sit pad, which I’m carrying anyway. The weight of this prototype is 3.5 oz. and uses a heavyweight awning fabric, just because that’s what I had laying around. It could be made from most any material, although I think this heavier material gives it a little structure.

Since it's just material it rolls up into a very small bundle.

It was immediately dubbed “the Jerry Chair”.

So here are the instructions to make your very own “Jerry Chair”. All it takes is a piece of material about 20” x 56”. The size isn’t too important. I was just winging it the night I made it.

https://www.hammockforums.net/gallery....=182617

Can we get a better link?  the one in your post did not return anything but a 404 error.  I would like to see what you use.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
34 replies since Mar. 03 2013, 10:43 am < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


Page 1 of 212>>
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply camp chair and pad
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions