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Topic: Gear list, Gear list critique< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:30 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My wife and I are somewhat new to backpacking (started about 3 years ago) and I have been trying to refine our equipment list.  I have not gotten my wife's clothes inventoried and weighed yet, so that is not included.  We actually currently have an REI Quarter Dome T3 tent, but I plan on replacing it before our trip this summer (Wonderland Trail hike in August). I have listed the Fly Creek UL2 because that is what I am leaning towards.

Any suggestions on cutting weight or other critiques would be much appreciated.

Backpack
Osprey Aether 70 78.54 oz
Osprey Ariel  65 74.74 oz
Sleeping bag
Big Agnes Saddle Mountain SL15 + compression sack 66.56 oz
Sleeping pad
Thermarest ProLite 24.04 oz
Thermarest ProLite 25.28 oz
Tent
Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 (w/ footprint) 47.00 oz
Clothes - Sam
Sunglasses
Columbia polyester pants 7.08 oz
Smartwool merino wool mid weight long sleeve shirt 9.20 oz
Crocs 12.00 oz
Keen Ketchum hiking boots 46.24 oz
Marmot Windstopper convertible gloves 3.42 oz
Cloth Bandana 1.16 oz
Northface fleece hat 2.64 oz
Columbia fleece jacket 17.46 oz
Columbia rain jacket 16.70 oz
Northface synthetic zip-off pants 18.16 oz
Sock liner (x3) 4.92 oz
FITS mid weight wool socks 2.84 oz
SmartWool low cut wool socks 1.72 oz
SmartWool mid weight wool socks 3.16 oz
Synthetic black Mountain Hardware t-shirt 3.98 oz
Synthetic blue Patagonia t-shirt 4.26 oz
Synthetic Exofficio underwear (x2) 5.92 oz
Kitchen
Jetboil coffee press 0.80 oz
Snow Peak titanium spork (x2) 1.02 oz
100g Jetboil canister (x2) 14.00 oz
Dish soap
Scrub pad
Snow Peak titanium double 450 mug (x2) 8.40 oz
Jetboil burner 5.22 oz
Jetboil Flash 1.0 L Cup 9.40 oz
Jetboil stabilizer 0.98 oz
Misc Gear
Osprey rain cover, Large (w/ bag) 4.76 oz
Osprey rain cover, Medium (w/ bag) 3.34 oz
Petzl LED head lamp w/ batteries (x2) 5.56 oz
Car key .56 oz
Carabiner (small Coleman) (x4) 1.88 oz
Cell phone - iPhone 4 4.96 oz
ID & Credit card 0.28 oz
Knife – Kershaw, small 1.78 oz
MSR small synthetic towel w/ bag 1.18 oz
Notepad & pen (small notepad) 1.78 oz
Repair kit
Spare battery – AAA (x3) 1.19 oz
Stuff sack - Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Stuff Sack L (15 L) 1.00 oz
Stuff sack - Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Stuff Sack S (6.5 L) 0.66 oz
Stuff sack - Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Stuff Sack XS (4 L) 0.52 oz
Stuff sack for clothes - Sea to Summit, medium 4.68 oz
Trekking poles
Black Diamond (blue) 20.44 oz
Black Diamond (red) 20.42 oz
Photography
Canon T2i camera body, strap 24.22 oz
Cleaning kit 4.20 oz
Extra memory card 0.20 oz
Remote release 0.74 oz
Spare battery 1.87 oz
White balance card 0.22 oz
Camera bag - Lowepro 50AW (w/o strap) 7.68 oz
18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 lens w/cap 7.32 oz
55-250mm lens w/ filter, hood & cap 16.14 oz
Gitzo Mountaineer w/ ballhead 33.32 oz
Safety & Survival
Bear spray 13.50 oz
Rope
First Aid Kit - Ultralight, 1-2 people, 4 days 8.18 oz
Compass – Brunton 2.78 oz
Map - Nat Geo Trails Illustrated Map 3.30 oz
REI Safety whistle (x2) 1.48 oz
Toiletries & Personal Care
Contact case (Sam) 0.28 oz
Contact solution (Sam), 4 oz 4.00 oz
Extra contacts (Sam) 0.21 oz
Glasses (Sam) 0.90 oz
Glasses case (Sam) 3.42 oz
Baby wipes, unscented 20 ct 5.98 oz
Hand sanitizer, 1 fl oz container 1.34 oz
Mouth wash, 1.22 fl oz container 1.86 oz
Tooth brush, folding travel brush 0.88 oz
Tooth paste, 0.85 oz tube 0.98 oz
Misc
Bug spray, Repel 100, 1 fl oz container 1.72 oz
Sea to Summit collapsible trowel 3.12 oz
Sunscreen, 1 fl oz container 1.26 oz
Water
32 oz Gatorade bottle (x2) 3.20 oz
Platypus Hoser 3.0L reservoir (x2) 8.24 oz
Katadyn Hiker Pro water filter w/ bag 14.92 oz
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

When you and your wife look back on that trip, I'm sure the first thing you'll reminisce about will be the fact that you could have found baby wipes that weighed only 5.27 ounces instead of 5.98 ounces
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think your list looks pretty good. You are taking along a lot of camera equipment which is your choice although it is heavy. Also the coffee press is a luxury but again if you want to carry it then go for it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 8:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I actually carried a significantly heavier lens (~26 oz) on a 6 day trip in Glacier as well as a 3 day on the AT.  I've decided that wasn't worth the weight any more so I cut over a pound out of my camera gear by "downgrading" that lens.  But taking pictures is a big part of these trips for me, so I am okay carrying the extra weight for that.  I may eventually go to a point and shoot, but I am hesitant to do that.

As for the coffee press, it is worth every 0.8 ounce.  Coffee is a necessity for me.  Waking up and having a cup of coffee as the sun rises is one of my absolute favorite wilderness experiences.  

If I could just pull the trigger on getting LASIK, I could eliminate all the glasses and contacts stuff.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 8:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(nogods @ Apr. 20 2013, 6:38 am)
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When you and your wife look back on that trip, I'm sure the first thing you'll reminisce about will be the fact that you could have found baby wipes that weighed only 5.27 ounces instead of 5.98 ounces

Not helpful
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 9:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm pretty sure that was a joke dude.

did you weigh your car keys, memory cards etc?
Really counting the ounces there...
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

After all that work -
List looks OK -  lil heavy in places but individual preferences prevail.
Everything has been itemized and weighed to the .01 oz.
Where are the final totals?...Ain't doing the math.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:52 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like your list, and am not a total gram weenie, but you asked for suggestions, and didn't mention budget. You could save a half pound each on your sleeping pads, and also on the water filter and fleece jacket.
That much or more on the shelter, too, since you haven't bought it yet.

I'm not overly familiar with current 2 person tents, but personally like the Six Moon Designs Haven plus the Haven Net tent(similar to/bigger than my 1p Tarptent Notch). For that matter the TT Stratospire 2 and Double Rainbow have the same floor space as that UL2, should give you more headroom, and be a little lighter.

Sawyer Squeeze filter would save ~10oz on the filter, and it's more compact. Inexpensive, too.

Switching pads to something like the Exped Synmat UL7 or Thermarest's newer NeoAir models would have you down to ~12-16oz per pad vs. the current 24 and 25oz.  

Unless you plan on hiking in it, the 17.4oz fleece could be replaced with a UL down jacket in the 9-10oz range, or even a ~5oz vest.

I'd research UL shelters(might a tarp suit you?), shop UL down vests or jackets(you'll want this anyway at some point, I bet) and take a look at that Sawyer Squeeze.
You could surely save weight on the packs themselves, but that's the last thing I'd change, personally.

I have sock liners, but have not found a need for them with merino wool socks. There's 5oz gone for free if you discover you don't need them, either.

You've got a 17oz rain jacket, too. Could knock off another half pound or more there with a fancy UL shell, or a DriDuck/Frogg Toggs if it would be suitable for the PNW in August.

One spare battery enough for that camera?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 6:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've definitely been thinking about replacing the sleeping pads.  And I'd like to get lighter packs eventually.  I'd be open to go to a tarp instead of a tent, but I don't think my wife would be on board with that quite yet.  

For the water filter, the only alternative I have really considered is UV treatment.  But since you have to carry spare batteries for it, I'm not sure how much weight is really saved over a filter.

Hadn't really looked to the clothes selection for weight savings yet, but I guess I have some room for improvement there.

The current list totals to about 51 lbs for the two of us (but this is not including my wife's clothes).  So probably be around 58 lbs with her clothes included.  So base weight (including worn items) should be around 29 lbs per person.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 7:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Looks pretty close to mine.  The only real difference is that I quit carrying a water filter last year and went to tablets.  Much lighter and more practical.  Of course, that depends on the type of water you'll be drinking.  Like was said, the photography gear is heavy, but I suspect that's a passion of yours and if you're will to carry, more power to you.  Also, I'd ditch the crocs. I don't find alternative footwear necessary or worth the weight in most cases.  I might ad an extra pair of socks given how wet the are you're going to hike in is.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 8:37 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Apr. 20 2013, 7:53 pm)
QUOTE
Looks pretty close to mine.  The only real difference is that I quit carrying a water filter last year and went to tablets.  Much lighter and more practical.  Of course, that depends on the type of water you'll be drinking.  Like was said, the photography gear is heavy, but I suspect that's a passion of yours and if you're will to carry, more power to you.  Also, I'd ditch the crocs. I don't find alternative footwear necessary or worth the weight in most cases.  I might ad an extra pair of socks given how wet the are you're going to hike in is.

I'm kind of apprehensive on the tablet thing.  I've seen people using them, but I still don't like the idea of adding chemicals to my water.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sambisu @ Apr. 20 2013, 8:17 am)
QUOTE

(nogods @ Apr. 20 2013, 6:38 am)
QUOTE
When you and your wife look back on that trip, I'm sure the first thing you'll reminisce about will be the fact that you could have found baby wipes that weighed only 5.27 ounces instead of 5.98 ounces

Not helpful

That's because you are too young to understand the wisdom of age.

When you show friends and family pictures of your backpacking trips, how many are of your scale?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sambisu @ Apr. 20 2013, 8:37 pm)
QUOTE
I'm kind of apprehensive on the tablet thing.  I've seen people using them, but I still don't like the idea of adding chemicals to my water.

Personal choice I guess.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 10:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Lot of extra stuff there I would not carry..........but what you carry is personal to your tastes.  Altho lighter without going overboard is easier on the body.  I could easily knock 5 lbs off your list but some would involve spending money to do so.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 20 2013, 11:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm not following what your post is about ?

Is it really about saving weight or just boasting about your spread sheet ?

You could easily dump 5-10 lbs if you're really striving for UL nirvana even w/o dumping the photo gear. How much $$ do you want to spent ??

A WM 10F Versalite sleeping bag ticks in at 32 oz, my personal bag.

If you think you can get away with a 32F bag, their Summerlite  bag is only 18 oz., And WM temp ratings are always conservative.

Look into a TT Squall 2 for a tent, at  34 oz

With that much reduced weight, you can ditch the big Osprey packs and get something lighter as well, the ULA Circuit weighs 39 oz.

And if you're seriously interest in saving some major weight, check out the Sony DSC-RX100 or the Canon G1X or at least ditch the tripod ( - 33 oz)

Again, it's all up to you and your budget/ hiking style.

Myself, my last 28 day trip for 2, self-supported,  tipped the scales at 85lbs TH weight in my pack, 10 lbs of which was only photo gear, and I wouldn't change my gear list at all.....

Whatever floats your boat...

This is a many year old "video" I produced



This is my 28 day Beartooth trip



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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 12:10 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm not following what your post is about.
Is it really about helping someone asking for suggestions, or pumping up your ego?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 2:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sambisu @ Apr. 20 2013, 4:30 am)
QUOTE
My wife and I are somewhat new to backpacking (started about 3 years ago) and I have been trying to refine our equipment list.  I have not gotten my wife's clothes inventoried and weighed yet, so that is not included.

Any suggestions on cutting weight or other critiques would be much appreciated.

My personal suggestion is to do what feels good to you ! The last few years it's become a "Keep up with the Jones's" inward spiral of less is best propagated by certain magazines and forums.

Your list looks good. You could save a pound here and there, but if you've taken you're gear out and it worked well for you, than you're fine. Gear envy is OK, but it leads to an empty pocket with minimal reward.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 2:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

SWT, Great Videos!  Wish my camera was that good.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 11:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(sambisu @ Apr. 20 2013, 6:30 am)
QUOTE
Any suggestions on cutting weight or other critiques would be much appreciated.

It's difficult to "critique" a list without really knowing your hiking style, so I can only make suggestions based on "if this was *my* gear list"...

There's nothing wrong with the list, per se, but I have to be honest, it sort of reads like an REI shopping list.  Have you backpacked with all of these things?  Do they work for you?

I fully admit to being a gram-weenie.  But that's because I'm a 51-year-old 5'2" mom who has an office desk job.  My few backpacking trips every year are infinitely more enjoyable with as light a pack as I can manage, without giving up "luxuries" like toilet paper and hot food to do so.  I aim for a base weight in the 11-12 lb range, not including worn clothing, hiking boots, poles, etc. or food/water.  My most recent total pack weight for 8 days with 3L of water was 29lb (prepared to 32deg temps.)

I went through a concerted effort to lighten my gear a few years ago.  I was carrying an Osprey Ariel 65 three years ago with a gear list much like yours.  My first step was to identify and remove things I didn't need.  On your list, re-consider things like:
- 3 sets of liners and socks
- Dish soap, scrub pad (looks like you're only boiling water and making coffee in your Jetboil?)
- Rain cover + a bunch of stuff sacks
- What do you need carabiners for?  If you're bringing only one thing, I'd take something like duct tape first.  If you have to have ties, Home Depot/Lowes sell these Velcro ties that are much lighter.

Then lighten up things that can be done inexpensively and/or easily.  These may seem silly but if you shave an ounce off of 16 things, you've saved a pound:
- Crocs - knock-off brands cost about $10 and are in the 7-8oz per pair range
- Fleece hat - lots of hats available in the 1-2oz range
- 3oz for underwear is pretty heavy
- If you *have to* have a pack cover, silnylon ones are in the 1-2oz range.
- 4.7oz stuff sack for clothes?  There's gotta be lighter ones.
- Pare down the first aid kit
- Do you really need 4oz of contact solution?
- Get a lighter glass case
- Wipes - 6oz?? Take them out of their packaging and put in light sandwich ziplock.

Once you've done the above, then look at your spreadsheet and where your big weight hits are.  Plan replacing things based on your budget.  Remember you can sell off used items to finance replacements.  Think "long-term" on these things.
- Sleeping pads - if you can use an inflatable, you can get comparable R-values and shave 10oz each.
- 17-18 oz each for a fleece jacket and rain jacket, both of which will probably spend most of the time *inside* your pack, is a lot of carrying weight.  If you really need to be prepared for temps below freezing (based on your 15* bag), a puffy insulation for camp will be lighter and warmer.
- Filter - I like a big hefty filter for some water sources but, imo, for most "mountain stream" locations, chemicals work just fine.  It look a bit to convince myself, though.  I bet you'll come around after you've shaved some weight off, look at your spreadsheet and realize that your water filter is the single-most heaviest item.
- Pack - By this point, you'll be ready for a different pack...  :)


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 1:06 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

29 pounds without food and water and no Bearcan?

Agree highly with TF above, (BTW, I also am not a gram weenie) but, this list is  ~10 pounds too heavy.
Your above gear list as shown might have been state of the hiking art last decade but…If serious about this; you can still do a little better… Since you asked.

1) Get your big 5: Pack, sleeping bag, kitchen, sleeping pad, and tent closer to 10 pounds than 15.
2) Lose the pack cover and line inside of your pack with a trash bag.
3) Why so many shirts, long-sleeve tops, fleece, and the 17 oz rain jacket?
4) Lose the soap.
5) Lose the heavy Sea-to-Summit stuff sack – clothes?
6) 8 oz for a first aid kit?
7) 14 oz of bear spray?
8) Number of socks?
9) Where is the bear can?
10) 3 oz of maps?
11) Trowel?
12)  6 oz of baby wipes?
13)  Sawyer squeeze...or drops.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 1:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Del Gue @ Apr. 21 2013, 2:09 am)
QUOTE
The last few years it's become a "Keep up with the Jones's" inward spiral of less is best propagated by certain magazines and forums.

Boy, ain't that the truth.  What I find amusing is that these same magazines that are always exclaiming the virtues of carrying less weight at the same time fill their pages with new gadgets and gizmos that only add weigh to your pack.  I mean  a French roast coffee press - reallly? ???

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 21 2013, 10:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for all the input.  I know I still have a ways to go on lightening our packs.  I will definitely look at eliminating some extraneous items.  Since we are buying a new tent (and I actually bought that sleeping bag a few months ago), probably won't want to spend a whole lot more this year on gear upgrades.  But I think I have a pretty good idea where to focus now.

Probably should have done more research and talking to people before buying all our gear a couple years ago.  Ended up with way to much random crap that is mostly too heavy.

We don't carry a bear canister because we haven't been anywhere that we have needed it.  Everywhere we have been with bears has had lines set up so we just needed rope.

I actually use the carabiners to attach my camera bag to my pack.  I have been trying to figure out an alternative way to attach it though.  At the very least, I guess I could lose 2 of them though.  I could do without the baby wipes completely to be honest (only used them once when we ran out of TP), but I will have to run that one by the wife.  She likes having them.

If I could just pull the trigger on LASIK, I could eliminate all the eye stuff.  Actually I never even take my contacts out on hiking trips.  But my sight is so bad without them, that I am too scared not to have some of that stuff.  Anyone else that wears contacts have tips on what they take backpacking?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For sanity's sake, PLEASE drill out your toothbrush. Those things are way too heavy.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 12:13 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Apr. 22 2013, 12:08 am)
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For sanity's sake, PLEASE drill out your toothbrush. Those things are way too heavy.

And cut the margins off your maps and labels out of your clothing.
I mean, let's get serious about this weight thing.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 12:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ Apr. 21 2013, 9:13 pm)
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(Tigger @ Apr. 22 2013, 12:08 am)
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For sanity's sake, PLEASE drill out your toothbrush. Those things are way too heavy.

And cut the margins off your maps and labels out of your clothing.
I mean, let's get serious about this weight thing.

And trim down the straps. Don't forget about the straps. Also, there are mini-utility biners that way less also and just as strong.

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treelinebackpacker Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 7:42 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't trim my maps or my straps.
Straps I've been tempted, but not because of weight, because I'm a small guy and the straps are 20 feet long and dangle everywhere.
Think that voids a warranty?
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 8:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And don't forget to trim your toenails and get a haircut before hitting the trail to really save some weight...

To the OP, you've received some great advice on specific items to reduce/replace/eliminate, and those saved grams and ounces really do add up.

My only other advice is to buy right the first time. It actually costs you more in the long run to get something less expensive now to find yourself replacing it with what you really should have gotten in the first place, that way you end up buying twice. Seems counter-intuitive, but spending more the first time can save you money in the long run and also will get your equipment and weight where you want it that much quicker, so you can enjoy it sooner and for longer.


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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 8:12 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(JRinGeorgia @ Apr. 22 2013, 8:04 am)
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My only other advice is to buy right the first time. It actually costs you more in the long run to get something less expensive now to find yourself replacing it with what you really should have gotten in the first place, that way you end up buying twice. Seems counter-intuitive, but spending more the first time can save you money in the long run and also will get your equipment and weight where you want it that much quicker, so you can enjoy it sooner and for longer.

Unfortunately this lesson has already been learned the hard way for us.  2 years ago I went and went and fully geared us up for backpacking (we had been avid car campers), but I didn't know anything about how much certain things should weigh (and everything already seemed so light and small compared to our normal camping gear).  Or even that I should be all that worried about weight.  So now we are slowly replacing things.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 8:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I find the negativity regarding going lighter amusing.  While some folks do some silly things in the name of going lighter, shaving weight can enhance the experience greatly and is a worthy pursuit.

Cutting out labels, cutting off excess straps, or shortening a toothbrush handle may yield minimal weight savings, but they cost nothing and have little to no negative impact on the experience.  So if you want to lighten the load where ever possible, why not?

Personally I don't understand the need to go really expensive on most items when the biggest part of weight saving is leaving stuff home or using lighter but not necessarily more expensive items.  I find that with fairly low cost approach I can get to 6.5 pounds base if I want to, but am likely to want some extra stuff on any given trip, so something like 11.5 pounds base weight is likely.  That includes some luxuries and a bear canister though.

At that point I really don't see spending large amounts of cash to shed another few ounces here and there.  What I really don't get is spending many hundreds of dollars to shave an ounce here and an ounce there while still carrying many pounds of excess clothing and gear items.

A few items are worth splurging on a bit.  Sleeping bags and pads come to mind.  I just don't really see the need to spend a bundle on a lot of Cuben fiber stuff since by the time you have shed the weight that can be shed more cheaply, the few extra ounces shed are pretty minimal in impact and pretty expensive.
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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 22 2013, 9:05 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TrailTromper @ Apr. 22 2013, 8:25 am)
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I find the negativity regarding going lighter amusing.  While some folks do some silly things in the name of going lighter, shaving weight can enhance the experience greatly and is a worthy pursuit.

Cutting out labels, cutting off excess straps, or shortening a toothbrush handle may yield minimal weight savings, but they cost nothing and have little to no negative impact on the experience.  So if you want to lighten the load where ever possible, why not?

Personally I don't understand the need to go really expensive on most items when the biggest part of weight saving is leaving stuff home or using lighter but not necessarily more expensive items.  I find that with fairly low cost approach I can get to 6.5 pounds base if I want to, but am likely to want some extra stuff on any given trip, so something like 11.5 pounds base weight is likely.  That includes some luxuries and a bear canister though.

At that point I really don't see spending large amounts of cash to shed another few ounces here and there.  What I really don't get is spending many hundreds of dollars to shave an ounce here and an ounce there while still carrying many pounds of excess clothing and gear items.

A few items are worth splurging on a bit.  Sleeping bags and pads come to mind.  I just don't really see the need to spend a bundle on a lot of Cuben fiber stuff since by the time you have shed the weight that can be shed more cheaply, the few extra ounces shed are pretty minimal in impact and pretty expensive.

I agree.    It's really tempting to start shaving weight by attacking the big items, because they constitute the bulk of the weight and also, imo, that's what magazine articles and such tend to focus on.  But a 1lb savings on a tent or sleeping bag can cost hundreds, while shaving an ounce off of 16 items is easier than you think and often free.  It may seem silly, but just choosing the right underwear and eyeglass case can save you 1/4 of that pound.

The good news is that you don't have to become a gear-addict just because you go through the exercise once.  I've gotten to the point where I'm happy with my gear.  I replace things as they wear out -- mostly socks and shoes.  I usually get a Christmas gift to upgrade something just for fun but that's really about it.

Also, don't underestimate how much of an impact a pound or two can make to smaller people, like women and kids, simply because our body weights are less.  My son weighs just over 100lb, so a 10lb difference is 10% of his body weight.  Big impact.  A 6' 200lb guy may not care whether his sleeping bag weighs 2lb or 3lb but it does matter to me.


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