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Topic: Surplus Rucksack< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
assquatch20 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Apr. 30 2013, 11:41 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Okay, new guy here, never backpacked a day in my life, ready to start. I read the thing, used the search function, etc. and still I gotta ask.

But first, I guess I should introduce myself. I'm a 22 year old student (taking a break) that's crossing over from motorcycle camping to save a little money, simplify things, and still get out. I enjoy music, the outdoors, bikes, and large-breasted women. Enough about me.

I've got this rucksack, and after some quick measurements, it seems to be right around 50 liters total. I used it camping last weekend and was surprised that it wasn't really uncomfortable loaded up.



Anyhow, I'm obviously getting into this now, and will definitely have to round out my gear before I get much ground covered (need a stove and a better bag to put myself in) but what about this sack? It's external frame, which I seem to read some folks don't like (how come?) and not as light or comfy as other stuff surely, but would it work for a few weeks out?

I'll get down to weighing things and better gear as I progress, but should I go out and find a purpose-made pack just yet? I'm a bit of a mule and like to take my time, so keep that in your consideration. I will probably pad the straps a bit and try to rig up something to distribute the weight better, but I'm liking it at the moment.

Ahead of time, thanks for any of your advice, sorry for being long-winded, and go easy on me, please.
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Tigger Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 12:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Get all your gear first, then decide if this pack will work for you. I doubt it. It holds gear away from your back which will be uncomfortable. You will find taller, thinner packs will be much more comfortable and two weeks worth of food sucks up quite a bit of space.

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If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
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assquatch20 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 3:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ May 01 2013, 12:11 am)
QUOTE
Get all your gear first, then decide if this pack will work for you. I doubt it. It holds gear away from your back which will be uncomfortable. You will find taller, thinner packs will be much more comfortable and two weeks worth of food sucks up quite a bit of space.

I think that's a good approach. I'm probably going to have around $1000 to put in towards gear so I suppose I should start rounding out the rest of it. Lots of research ahead, and I'm very excited.

I have to say, this is a very resourceful site and it seems like a good community.

To clarify, though, I will not be covering ground to meet deadlines. I will probably put 6-8 hours in daily once I'm up and running and will likely carry smaller batches of food to be restocked when I can, or plan to fish from time to time. A lot of folks seem to take cameras, but I'm more of a phonographer and will probably forgo the camera and stick a hammock in as my luxury item, if possible.

Regardless, I'm thinking maybe a Deuter 65+10 would be more accommodating, but there's no clear cut winners that I can find out there. Any ideas of what pack I should start with are greatly appreciated.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 4:12 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you like hammocks, I would go so far as to make it your primary shelter, not just a luxury. I often backpack with my Hennessy Hammock Ultralight being my primary shelter during the more mild seasons.

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tomas Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 4:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(assquatch20 @ May 01 2013, 3:59 pm)
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Regardless, I'm thinking maybe a Deuter 65+10 would be more accommodating, but there's no clear cut winners that I can find out there. Any ideas of what pack I should start with are greatly appreciated.

The age old wisdom of buy your gear and then your pack applies. Having said that, I've got the Deuter 65+10 and love it.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 6:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That budget will work fine, but it may mean you later upgrade something.  I have a WarBonnet BlackBird hammock, and it is my primary shelter.  I own the Double 1.7 version, which costs $175.  To make this work, you might add a tarp over the top to keep you dry, which can be as simple as a 8 x 10 from a hardware store, or you can go to one of the silnylon makers of tarps and get one for about $110.  OK, so now you have nearly $300 tied up in your shelter, but it will last for many years.  Using a hammock allows you to skip the ground pad altogether, but you might want a cheap closed cell foam one under you for wind blockage.  It will keep you warmer.

A good 20* sleeping bag or top quilt for the hammock will suit most people for most camping.  Good down covering can cost $250 or better, but there are some cheaper synthetics that can be had for in the mean time.

Let's say you now have half of your budget tied up in shelter and bag.  Your pack of choice, so far, is $200, leaving you with $300 for everything else.  Not bad.  Any number of good stoves can be had for $20-30.  A cook pot is another $20.  A first aid kit can be made up from what is on hand at home, or the items bought from the pharmacy for less than $15.

The rest of the gear and clothing can be done as you learn what you like and what you don't.  For a real rundown on hammock camping, visit Hammock Forums  


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"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth."  Steve McQueen
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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 6:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Welcome to the world of wilderness travel.  

There are many experienced folks here who would probably be more than willing to help you.  Many of those experienced hikers are female and might not appreciate the gratuitous comment in your very first post here.
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assquatch20 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 01 2013, 11:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

QUOTE
For a real rundown on hammock camping, visit Hammock Forums  


I've come familiar with them from the moto-camping world, and seem to be partial to Hennessy stuff for the sleeping position, but I'll definitely investigate further. I've got a (I suppose) cheap one a friend gave me, but it's got no netting or anything of that sort. At the moment I also have a Half Dome 2 that I'm really liking, so it's a tossup for now on whether or not I want a proper hammock.

QUOTE
Welcome to the world of wilderness travel.  

There are many experienced folks here who would probably be more than willing to help you.  Many of those experienced hikers are female and might not appreciate the gratuitous comment in your very first post here.


Apologies, I appreciate the advice there. I usually post on forums comprised of men and the women who gracefully put up with us. No offense implied.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 02 2013, 10:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Before you buy anything, go to BP101 in the stickies. Quite possibly the greatest repository of truth and lies in the known universe, but it should provide you with more than enough to spend that grand wisely. My own entry has to do with building a solid 3-season kit; bag/pad/tent/boots/tech jacket, etc. on a budget.

As for that pack of yours, probably better suited for the city than the sticks. Most military gear isn't real suitable for bping - it's made to be take a beating and last. Our stuff is typically more fragile for the sake of weight. My summer pack, fully loaded, probably weighs less. And if (when) it gets wet, it may rival my winter pack.

A mule you may be, but walking in comfort is always better. Extra weight has a kind of exponential effect on the trail. What started as 3 more pounds you'd swear swelled to 15 somehow. And if you get your pack down from 50 lbs to, say, 25 lbs, you'll find you can more than double your distance and likely, without really trying, increase your speed by 25%. Now, you get to see more, or get to some great sites you couldn't before. And avoid my knees when you're my age.

You wanna see some real loonies? Check out the ultralight forum. There's a story of a guy who did the AT with all of his gear in a Vera Wang clutch and a take-out bowl from a Chinese restaurant.

Welcome to the nuthouse.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 04 2013, 10:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(assquatch20 @ May 01 2013, 3:59 pm)
QUOTE
Regardless, I'm thinking maybe a Deuter 65+10 would be more accommodating, but there's no clear cut winners that I can find out there. Any ideas of what pack I should start with are greatly appreciated.

I have a Deuter 65+10 and it's a bomber pack.  Very comfortable as well.  

Which Deuter 65+10 are you thinking about?  Mine is the heavy duty Aircontact, and it weighs in at 6 lbs. even.  The 65+10 ACT Lite weighs in at only 3 lbs., 10 oz.  They are two very different packs, as I'm sure you know.  I would not want the Aircontact as a primary pack because it's too heavy; I have a ULA Circuit for that.  For the occasional heavy hauling though, the Deuter can't be beat.  

If it were to be my only pack, I would opt for the ACT Lite.


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assquatch20 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 04 2013, 3:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(justwalkin @ May 04 2013, 10:34 am)
QUOTE

(assquatch20 @ May 01 2013, 3:59 pm)
QUOTE
Regardless, I'm thinking maybe a Deuter 65+10 would be more accommodating, but there's no clear cut winners that I can find out there. Any ideas of what pack I should start with are greatly appreciated.

I have a Deuter 65+10 and it's a bomber pack.  Very comfortable as well.  

Which Deuter 65+10 are you thinking about?  Mine is the heavy duty Aircontact, and it weighs in at 6 lbs. even.  The 65+10 ACT Lite weighs in at only 3 lbs., 10 oz.  They are two very different packs, as I'm sure you know.  I would not want the Aircontact as a primary pack because it's too heavy; I have a ULA Circuit for that.  For the occasional heavy hauling though, the Deuter can't be beat.  

If it were to be my only pack, I would opt for the ACT Lite.

I was thinking the ACT Lite, but what are the big differences between the two?
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