SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.


» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

 

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: Primaloft vs. Down sweater, Pros and Cons< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Three Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1075
Joined: Dec. 2011
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 6:30 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Getting a lightweight "down sweater" type jacket has been on my wish list for a while...

Saw what looks like one yesterday, then when I got to the rack it said "Primaloft."

How Primaloft compare to a 800 fill down jacket for general backpacking use?

Thanks
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
big_load Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 23867
Joined: Jun. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 7:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Down is warmer for the weight and more durable in terms of how long it maintains loft.  I have both down and Primaloft garments.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 7:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I went through that debate last year - down or prima loft.  I settled on a North Face prima loft jacket (the fact it was on sale helped in my decision).  Not quite as lightweight, but it seemed more durable as far as abuse was concerned and there wasn't the wet factor as there is with down.  I've just purchased a First Ascent down micro vest to layer under it which, I think, will be a pretty good combination except for fairly cold situations.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
3pinner Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 803
Joined: Sep. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 9:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I hike the Mid Atlantic region, and my personal choice for years has been synthetic or wool insulation for outerwear (clothing), and down for sleeping.
Reason - My clothing is more exposed to the weather than the sleeping bag in my tent or my tarp.
True synthetic loft materials don't last as long as down, but that doesn't matter to me.
Right now my preferred garments are Montbell thermawrap jacket for general wear, and I have a heavier primaloft hooded parka for winter use.
Honestly though, it probably really doesn't make a difference on short overnighters, as long as the down garments are kept dry.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 5
icewarrior Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13
Joined: Jun. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 9:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I love my REI revelcloud primaloft hooded jacket!  Never had a down so dont really have anything to compare it to
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 6
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2679
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: May 05 2013, 10:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Down is warmer for the weight.  I have a Patagonia Nano Puff pullover (primaloft) and a Montbell UL Inner jacket (down).  I really like them both and they're comparable in terms of warmth.  The Nano Puff weighs 8.5oz and the Montbell weighs 5.7oz.

--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 7
wcolucci Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2061
Joined: Feb. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 7:48 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I switched from fleece to down a few years ago when I bought a Marmot Zeus...but just a few weeks ago I saw a pretty neat little 1/2 zip synthetic puffy at LL Bean discounted from $99 to $18.

I took it w/me last weekend on a three day trip. With a l/s baselayer, (no name running shirt), I was warm at 25 at night hanging around the lean to.  In the morning, 18+/- I was fine w it and a rainshell on top....hat both times, crocs and socks in the morning

My only "issue" w/it is it did not compress as well as I thought it may but I am spoiled by downs compressibility.

Would I have purchased it at $99?...Never......I like my down puffy, but this did the job very well.


--------------
getting old stinks...but it beats the alternative
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 8
cweston Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2802
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 8:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For me, it really depends on how it will be used.

If it's going to be worn at camp, then down is perfect: it's light and compressible and warm.

If it's going to be worn on the trail, then synthetic has a real advantage in that it still insulates well when it gets wet. I don;t know about you, but *everything* I wear on the trail gets wet.

Now, I'm a 3-season backpacker whose body generates a lot of heat on the trail, so I never wear anything that warm on the trail. So a down sweater is perfect for me.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 9
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12008
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 8:21 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I don't wear insulating layers while hiking. I only use them at camp. I have multiple synthetic mid-layers and two down mid-layers. My synthetic layers gather dust. I always grab my down. Lighter, packs smaller. Not concerned about moisture because it is worn under a rainshell if it's wet outside.

--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 10
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 06 2013, 11:26 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ May 06 2013, 8:21 am)
QUOTE
Not concerned about moisture because it is worn under a rainshell if it's wet outside.

I'm a bit like cweston.  When hiking, even at a moderate pace, I sweat profusely.  Generally, unless it quite cold, if I wear down while hiking, it gets wet from my own sweat.  This is especially true if I wear it under any kind of shell, "breathable" or not.  Therefore, I always keep my down primarily for non-active times such as around camp, rest breaks, etc.  I find synthetics work best for me when I'm active.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 11
BradMT Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4026
Joined: May 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 8:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Remember there are different weights of Primaloft.

The North Face Redpoint jacket, for instance, uses 100 gram Primaloft and is very close/equal to the warmth of the Patagonia or Marmot down sweaters.

OTOH, the Patagonia Micro Puff or REI Revelcloud use 60 gram Primaloft and are definitely not as warm as the average down sweater.

I prefer down, but own a couple Primaloft jackets. If one only I'd go down.


--------------
Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty. – Socrates
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 12
SmokeyBear Search for posts by this member.
I know shoe-fu
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3805
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 2:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My primaloft jacket (with 100 gram primaloft one) was a real surprise gem. Yes, it's not as compressible as down, and is only as warm as 550 power fill by weight. But it just works so well - it's breathes, it dries quickly, and even when wetted out has been surprisingly warm. But I've only used it on day excursions, and for overnighters I bring down since I'm not likely to wear it on the trail (except maybe for breaks).

I'll echo the sentiments of others here. If I'm on the move, I'd prefer to wear the primaloft due to better breathability and moisture wicking. For around camp, where moisture management and venting is not much of a concern, down is great.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 13
no_granola Search for posts by this member.
minor deity
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13174
Joined: Dec. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 7:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The magical insulating properties of wet synthetic fill are, by and large, mythical.  If your insulation gets wet you're going to have a problem.  People use down on long trails all the time with no issues due to moisture build up.  I can't imagine that it's an issue except perhaps in extreme expeditions of significant length.
 
For the average weekend warrior the real question concerns what your wallet and your back can support.


--------------
I never imagined that being obnoxious would get me where I am today.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 14
no_granola Search for posts by this member.
minor deity
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13174
Joined: Dec. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 7:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ May 06 2013, 11:26 am)
QUOTE

(Tigger @ May 06 2013, 8:21 am)
QUOTE
Not concerned about moisture because it is worn under a rainshell if it's wet outside.

I'm a bit like cweston.  When hiking, even at a moderate pace, I sweat profusely.  Generally, unless it quite cold, if I wear down while hiking, it gets wet from my own sweat.  This is especially true if I wear it under any kind of shell, "breathable" or not.  Therefore, I always keep my down primarily for non-active times such as around camp, rest breaks, etc.  I find synthetics work best for me when I'm active.

If you're sweating profusely, you should probably lose the insulating layer anyway. The fact that it's cold and you're sweating means you're overdressed.

It's all about moisture management.


--------------
I never imagined that being obnoxious would get me where I am today.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 15
SmokeyBear Search for posts by this member.
I know shoe-fu
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3805
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 8:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(no_granola @ May 07 2013, 7:41 pm)
QUOTE
The magical insulating properties of wet synthetic fill are, by and large, mythical.  If your insulation gets wet you're going to have a problem.

For the average weekend warrior the real question concerns what your wallet and your back can support.

If you're sweating profusely, you should probably lose the insulating layer anyway. The fact that it's cold and you're sweating means you're overdressed.

It's all about moisture management.

Agreed, if you're getting your down that wet either something has gone amiss or you're doing something silly.

The only thing I'd add is that synthetics DO tend to dry faster and more efficiently, without require "fluffing" to remove clumps etc. In a worst case scenario.

Me - I stick to down for real warmth when backpacking, and those are layers I reserve for camp. When i am actively hiking I am wearing as little as possible, and no more than a light fleece (only if temps are a notably below freezing).
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 16
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 9:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(no_granola @ May 07 2013, 7:41 pm)
QUOTE
If you're sweating profusely, you should probably lose the insulating layer anyway. The fact that it's cold and you're sweating means you're overdressed.

It's all about moisture management.

Guess, I didn't make myself clear.  Because I sweat so easily is precisely why I don't wear down when I'm active.  If it's anywhere above 20 degrees and I'm active, I only wear a base layer and maybe a shell.  That usually seems to work for me.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 17
no_granola Search for posts by this member.
minor deity
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 13174
Joined: Dec. 2004
PostIcon Posted on: May 07 2013, 10:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ May 07 2013, 9:31 pm)
QUOTE

(no_granola @ May 07 2013, 7:41 pm)
QUOTE
If you're sweating profusely, you should probably lose the insulating layer anyway. The fact that it's cold and you're sweating means you're overdressed.

It's all about moisture management.

Guess, I didn't make myself clear.  Because I sweat so easily is precisely why I don't wear down when I'm active.  If it's anywhere above 20 degrees and I'm active, I only wear a base layer and maybe a shell.  That usually seems to work for me.

That's generally my plan too.  The down jacket comes out when I stop.

--------------
I never imagined that being obnoxious would get me where I am today.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 18
TigerFan Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 2679
Joined: May 2010
PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 9:15 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(no_granola @ May 07 2013, 10:02 pm)
QUOTE
The down jacket comes out when I stop.

I guess I assumed that's how the OP would use it.

Which is one reason I'm especially conscious of how much they weigh, because when I'm moving, I'm almost always carrying it in my pack.


--------------
Duct tape is like the Force.  It has a light side, a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 19
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12008
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 10:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ May 06 2013, 8:26 am)
QUOTE

(Tigger @ May 06 2013, 8:21 am)
QUOTE
Not concerned about moisture because it is worn under a rainshell if it's wet outside.

I'm a bit like cweston.  When hiking, even at a moderate pace, I sweat profusely.  Generally, unless it quite cold, if I wear down while hiking, it gets wet from my own sweat.  This is especially true if I wear it under any kind of shell, "breathable" or not.  Therefore, I always keep my down primarily for non-active times such as around camp, rest breaks, etc.  I find synthetics work best for me when I'm active.

I don't know if I was clear in what I was saying but I started by stating that "I don't wear insulating layers while hiking" meaning that I don't wear down either.

Heck, I don't even wear insulating layers (only base layers) in temps down into the single digits.


--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 20
BradMT Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4026
Joined: May 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 08 2013, 10:20 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

--------------
Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty. – Socrates
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 21
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 12:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE
I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

Really? So what do you wear when it's minus 30 degrees?  Seems cold enough to me that I'd want some sort of insulation.  You must be a whole lot tougher than me - not that that's saying a lot.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 22
tripleDot Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 71
Joined: Jan. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 4:01 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE
I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

Wow!  Any chance you're a walrus or a polar bear?    :D
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 23
BradMT Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4026
Joined: May 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 7:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE

(BradMT @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE
I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

Really? So what do you wear when it's minus 30 degrees?  Seems cold enough to me that I'd want some sort of insulation.  You must be a whole lot tougher than me - not that that's saying a lot.

Jer, I'm talking about when I'm moving, guess I wasn't clear, but in contextr that's what all were talking about.

In those temps I generally wear a mid-weight zip t-neck, a 100 wt Polartec zip t-neck, and the lightest windshirt I own. Those 3 layers work perfectly down to -30F, again as long as I'm moving. I keep the down layer dry and handy for stops.


--------------
Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty. – Socrates
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 24
Tigger Search for posts by this member.
Woods Pouncer
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 12008
Joined: Apr. 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 10:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ May 09 2013, 4:55 am)
QUOTE

(hikerjer @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE

(BradMT @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE
I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

Really? So what do you wear when it's minus 30 degrees?  Seems cold enough to me that I'd want some sort of insulation.  You must be a whole lot tougher than me - not that that's saying a lot.

Jer, I'm talking about when I'm moving, guess I wasn't clear, but in contextr that's what all were talking about.

In those temps I generally wear a mid-weight zip t-neck, a 100 wt Polartec zip t-neck, and the lightest windshirt I own. Those 3 layers work perfectly down to -30F, again as long as I'm moving. I keep the down layer dry and handy for stops.

+1

similar - Base layer, mid/light weight fleece, and rainshell if heavy snows.


--------------
If I'm going to be lost, in the woods is where I want to be...
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info WEB 
 Post Number: 25
hikerjer Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 10911
Joined: Apr. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 12:38 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(BradMT @ May 09 2013, 7:55 am)
QUOTE

(hikerjer @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE

(BradMT @ May 08 2013, 10:20 pm)
QUOTE
I can't remember ever wearing a true insulating layer  (primaloft or down) above -30F.

Really? So what do you wear when it's minus 30 degrees?  Seems cold enough to me that I'd want some sort of insulation.  You must be a whole lot tougher than me - not that that's saying a lot.

Jer, I'm talking about when I'm moving, guess I wasn't clear, but in contextr that's what all were talking about.

In those temps I generally wear a mid-weight zip t-neck, a 100 wt Polartec zip t-neck, and the lightest windshirt I own. Those 3 layers work perfectly down to -30F, again as long as I'm moving. I keep the down layer dry and handy for stops.

Makes sense if that works for you guys.  But for me, at those temps even when I'm active, I might need a little more.  And I thought I was cold blooded.  But we're all different and different things work for different people it different ways.  What's important is to find a system that works for you.

--------------
"Too often I have met men who boast only of how many miles they've traveled and not of what they've seen."  -  Louis L'Amour
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 26
SmokeyBear Search for posts by this member.
I know shoe-fu
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3805
Joined: Mar. 2009
PostIcon Posted on: May 09 2013, 2:00 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That system is dynamic too. Sometimes I can get away with wearing just a baselayer and 100 weight fleece in -20, but if there's a stiff breeze or it's more humid I might need a windshirt to keep that down. And some days you just run hotter or colder than others. Around camp though in -20 I am wearing multiple down/primaloft layers, because once I sit for a while my thermostat drops like crazy. Guess that's why it's always important to bring a mix of layers that can be arranged to meet your needs.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 27
BradMT Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 4026
Joined: May 2005
PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2013, 9:11 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(hikerjer @ May 09 2013, 10:38 am)
QUOTE
What's important is to find a system that works for you.

Exactly Jer... we're all so different.

--------------
Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty. – Socrates
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 28
bigsilk Search for posts by this member.
A different kind of rebel...
Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 1190
Joined: Feb. 2012
PostIcon Posted on: May 10 2013, 9:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've been in some pretty cold stuff, and I don't even own a down/primaloft jacket/sweater, and I never get cold. Just my tech shell and maybe a couple of synth b/l. When hiking, pit zips and jacket full bore open, usually. Then cinch it all up tight for the fireside.

--------------
There are only two things I don't like about people: They take too long to cook and taste like crap when they're done.
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 29
rangersven Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 3621
Joined: Jul. 2002
PostIcon Posted on: May 12 2013, 12:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

FYI-the Nano Puff jacket goes on sale this coming Friday the 17th for $139.99 at REI and REI.com.

Happy Trails,

RS


--------------
"Backpacker.com's Original Provocateur."
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 30
kevperro Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 592
Joined: Oct. 2010
PostIcon Posted on: May 13 2013, 6:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've used both... down much longer than synthetic and on a couple long trips (500+ miles).    Unless you are in rain for weeks at a time it isn't a problem keeping it dry enough in camp.  

I currently use a synthetic jacket by Pantigonia.  It isn't as warm as my down jacket (16oz - WARM down jacket) but I find it more flexible for cool but not COLD weather.   It does fine for me around camp down to freezing.   It is a great 3-season solution because it does dry faster, packs down well and is warm enough to keep me comfy while being more moisture resistant.


--------------
“He is a self-made man, very much in love with his creator.”

Benjamin Disraeli
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
29 replies since May 05 2013, 6:30 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


 
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply Primaloft vs. Down sweater
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code



Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions