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Topic: Eureka Spitfire 2 or Kelty Grand Mesa 2, Anyone have experience with both?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:37 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

So I'm looking at getting a two person 3 season tent again, and I'm somewhat torn between these two.  

Posted weights are similar, Spitfire has the edge on square footage, but lacks any vestibule and due to the shape I wonder how much is usable.

The Kelty GM2 is freestanding, but only has one door.  

Anyone have experience with either or ideally both?
Looking to spend less than $150 on a tent with the "minimum weight" around 4lbs.

I have and love a spitfire solo, its been everything I've wanted in a solo tent, but now that my kids are getting older and getting interested, I need a bigger light weight option (I also have a two person four season tent, but its a bit weighty)

Also I'm open to other options in the price range that I'm missing?  Please no "Well for $400 you could get bibler/hilldeburgh lah blah blah" as I'm just not interested if I have to pay more than $150.

Thanks
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The GM2 was actually my first tent, and I still have it. I will admit, I don't take it backpacking anymore, but I keep it around for the kids, or as a loaner tent. As well, I sometimes take it to use the first night before a trip, this way I don't have to unpack my pack, then pack it back up the next morning before getting a ride. I can just throw this tent up, sleep in it, then throw it back in my car the next morning.

The tent itself is a good tent. It has slept both me and my wife, or me and my son just fine. Not a ton of extra room, but enough for us to be comfortable and not feel smushed together. My sleeping bag will brush against the foot end of the tent, and sometimes the head end, but since this is a double wall tent, it is not much of an issue. And the single door has been fine by me, even with 2 people. But it's easy to set-up, has stood up to some high winds on top of Max Patch and does the job. I think I paid around $120 ish for it, maybe less, but I have been happy enough with it.

The reason I don't carry it anymore is due to the weight, something around 4.5 - 5 lbs...

Here is a write up I did on it a while back, with a link to my review on Backpackgeartest:

http://sticksblog.com/gear/my-current-gear/shelter/kelty-grand-mesa-2/

I don't have any experience with the other tent you mentioned.

For a side entry option, you may want to check out the Kelty Salida 2 tent. It only has a single side door, but can usually be found around (or below) the $150 mark and weighs just under the 4 lb mark. Here is one from Campmor for $136

http://www.campmor.com/kelty-s....&ci_kw=


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:56 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Not saying that these are better, just offering other options.

ALPS Zephyr seems popular:
http://www.backcountry.com/alps-mo....on-tent

There's also the new GoLite 'Wolf Creek'.  Double side-doors, good specs.  $199 but 15% off (so, $170, which I suspect is a really good deal) through the weekend.
http://www.golite.com/Wolf-Creek-L2-P46998.aspx


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 1:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

STICK:  I think you have the older version, the newer one is supposed to be 4lb 8oz fully packed, 4lb "minimum weight".  I like the Salida as well, but it costs more, and the single side door just doesnt look like a winner to me.  The head end door on the GM2 though is more attractive to me.

TigerFan:  I've actually just started looking a the Zephey 3, as I could fit two kids and me in there, and it weighs less than the 2 person 4 season i have (and will be carrying this weekend)...

The wolf creek looks nice, but is outside my price range and doesnt seem to add anything above the other ones I am looking at.

anybody else?  I know there are some spitfire 2 users around here...
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 4:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mine is the older style (bought in 2009). I went back and looked, the listed minimum weight on mine in specific was 4 lbs 2 oz, and the measured weight was 4 lbs 9 oz, so it looks to be on par with the current model. It looks like the newer one has a slightly different design on the mesh, and the front door zips almost completely around now. And of course the colors have changed. Either way, they are about the same.

And I agree with you about the placement of the door if there is only going to be one. A head entry would be a better idea.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 4:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(booyah @ May 24 2013, 10:37 am)
QUOTE
So I'm looking at getting a two person 3 season tent again, and I'm somewhat torn between these two.  

Posted weights are similar, Spitfire has the edge on square footage, but lacks any vestibule and due to the shape I wonder how much is usable.

The Kelty GM2 is freestanding, but only has one door.  

Anyone have experience with either or ideally both?
Looking to spend less than $150 on a tent with the "minimum weight" around 4lbs.

I have and love a spitfire solo, its been everything I've wanted in a solo tent, but now that my kids are getting older and getting interested, I need a bigger light weight option (I also have a two person four season tent, but its a bit weighty)

Also I'm open to other options in the price range that I'm missing?  Please no "Well for $400 you could get bibler/hilldeburgh lah blah blah" as I'm just not interested if I have to pay more than $150.

Thanks

Boo,

Can't comment on the model tent of Eureka your looking for, but I have a 2003 Eureka Alpinlite 2XT 4 season tent that rocks! Handled everything that ever has been thrown it's way, however I maintain my equipment on a near insane level. It's in perfect condition and will wipe the floor floor with tents hundreds of dollars more in cost.

Here are 27 reviews on the model Eureka your thinking about;

http://www.campmor.com/eureka-spitfire-2-tent.shtml

They certainly have the history behind them!

http://www.eurekatent.com/detail.aspx?id=32


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 4:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I wouldn't get either.

I would want a true two person shelter and this one is huge and light.  And within your budget.  The Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo Outfitter.

HERE


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 7:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 4:22 pm)
QUOTE
I wouldn't get either.

I would want a true two person shelter and this one is huge and light.  And within your budget.  The Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo Outfitter.

HERE

Wow, yeah, can't argue with that.  Lunar Duo for that price is a fantastic buy.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 7:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Looks like a nice tent, although using hiking poles for a tent was a disaster for me when I ordered and promptly returned a tent using them. One has to tear down one's tent to go hiking, then pitch it back up upon return if you want to use your hiking poles vs. a tent with poles included that you can leave up. At the end of a long day of rugged hiking, personally the last thing I want to do is repitch my tent again.

That is something you may want to consider plus this comment on the Six Moon;

"but I do have one issue with it, and that’s the floor. The floor in the Lunar Duo is actually a floating floor. What I mean by this is that the tent is actually a tarp (single wall), and once it is pitched using my trekking poles and (at a minimum) 6 stakes, the floor hangs down from the perimeter of the tent by a no-see-um mesh. So, the floor literally hangs from the roof of the tent, however, there is an elastic cord at each corner of the bathtub style floor that stretches out to the corresponding corner of the tent which manages to hold the floor in place, somewhat"

"The floor is made using a 30D ultralight silnylon, and anyone that has put their hands on a piece of silnylon knows one thing, it it slick! Now just imagine this slick material as the floor of your tent, and not stationary at that. What I have found is that even on the slightest of slopes the floor will actually begin to slide away. My problem with that is that I don’t want to wake up in the morning from either sliding into my trekking pole and knocking it down, or worse, wake up and realize that the floor has slid far enough away to actually tear away from the tent!"

http://sticksblog.com/gear....nar-duo


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 7:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 7:46 pm)
QUOTE
Looks like a nice tent, although using hiking poles for a tent was a disaster for me when I ordered and promptly returned a tent using them. One has to tear down one's tent to go hiking, then pitch it back up upon return if you want to use your hiking poles vs. a tent with poles included that you can leave up. At the end of a long day of rugged hiking, personally the last thing I want to do is repitch my tent again.

I just slide my poles out and leave the tent collapsed.  When I get back, just put the poles back.  Takes about 10 seconds to do.  Not a big deal.   ???

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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 8:08 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TigerFan @ May 24 2013, 7:57 pm)
QUOTE

(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 7:46 pm)
QUOTE
Looks like a nice tent, although using hiking poles for a tent was a disaster for me when I ordered and promptly returned a tent using them. One has to tear down one's tent to go hiking, then pitch it back up upon return if you want to use your hiking poles vs. a tent with poles included that you can leave up. At the end of a long day of rugged hiking, personally the last thing I want to do is repitch my tent again.

I just slide my poles out and leave the tent collapsed.  When I get back, just put the poles back.  Takes about 10 seconds to do.  Not a big deal.   ???

Assuming it doesn't rain while your out hiking, then having dirt and mud all over your tent while lying in a heap on the ground, then getting all that dirt, mud and debris all over yourself, poles and gear when pitching it back up. :(

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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 8:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 9:46 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 8:59 pm)
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8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

? OK, using the scenario he used (leaving tent in a heap on the ground) and your out hiking for the day. A thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a bunch of rain. You come back and the tent we are taking about which is basically a tarp will not be wet, muddied and collect debris?
Over thinking? ???  
Think I would prefer a tent that is taut and erect and pegged down to come back to vs. a tent collapsed in a heap on the ground!


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 9:51 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've never liked tarp tents either.
To me, it just seems like a pain when a normal tent is so much easier to pitch.
Both of these tents are fine tents.
It really comes down to side or front entry. I've always prefered front entry if there is only one door. No climbing over people.
I've also always had great luck with Kelty tents.
Not the lightest out there, no. But it's a strong reliable tent.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ May 24 2013, 9:51 pm)
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I've never liked tarp tents either.
To me, it just seems like a pain when a normal tent is so much easier to pitch.

Considering the variety of tarp tent designs, that generalization doesn't hold up too well.  Many of them pitch about the same way as regular tent.   Even  those that don't can go up quickly.  The Contrail takes 2-3 minutes once you get the hang of it.  Franco's record is quite a bit better than that.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 9:46 pm)
QUOTE

(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 8:59 pm)
QUOTE
8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

? OK, using the scenario he used (leaving tent in a heap on the ground) and your out hiking for the day. A thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a bunch of rain. You come back and the tent we are taking about which is basically a tarp will not be wet, muddied and collect debris?
Over thinking? ???  
Think I would prefer a tent that is taut and erect and pegged down to come back to vs. a tent collapsed in a heap on the ground!

Well, it wouldn't be a heap because you would have left some gear in it.  I am assuming because if you went for a hike carrying all of your gear than why not take the tent.  It is light enough.

If there is a storm that is blowing debris around and enough rain to splash mud then the odds are that your excursion away from your tent was short lived and you made it back in time.  It also means that if you left it erected, it would likely be caked with mud and debris anyway as your scenario implies a nasty, windy storm.

I don't know but honestly, it isn't a big deal.  Most cases I don't take my trekking poles for a day hike away from my shelter.  I simply don't need them if I am not hiking with a full pack.

Regarding the heap on the ground.  Take my Tarptent Notch, for example.  Assuming all I have done is taken the poles out and it is still pegged to the ground, it will take exactly 10 seconds to reset the poles.  From bag to set up, my tarptent goes up in less than one minute.  I bet your tent doesn't.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 10:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ May 24 2013, 9:51 pm)
QUOTE
I've also always had great luck with Kelty tents.
Not the lightest out there, no. But it's a strong reliable tent.

You haven't used enough Tarptents then.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 10:41 pm)
QUOTE

(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 9:46 pm)
QUOTE

(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 8:59 pm)
QUOTE
8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

? OK, using the scenario he used (leaving tent in a heap on the ground) and your out hiking for the day. A thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a bunch of rain. You come back and the tent we are taking about which is basically a tarp will not be wet, muddied and collect debris?
Over thinking? ???  
Think I would prefer a tent that is taut and erect and pegged down to come back to vs. a tent collapsed in a heap on the ground!

Well, it wouldn't be a heap because you would have left some gear in it.  I am assuming because if you went for a hike carrying all of your gear than why not take the tent.  It is light enough.

If there is a storm that is blowing debris around and enough rain to splash mud then the odds are that your excursion away from your tent was short lived and you made it back in time.  It also means that if you left it erected, it would likely be caked with mud and debris anyway as your scenario implies a nasty, windy storm.

I don't know but honestly, it isn't a big deal.  Most cases I don't take my trekking poles for a day hike away from my shelter.  I simply don't need them if I am not hiking with a full pack.

Regarding the heap on the ground.  Take my Tarptent Notch, for example.  Assuming all I have done is taken the poles out and it is still pegged to the ground, it will take exactly 10 seconds to reset the poles.  From bag to set up, my tarptent goes up in less than one minute.  I bet your tent doesn't.

OK, lets play scenario after scenario so we can can justify our tents because since its my tent, it's perfect and all others are garbage and don't deserve to be in the same conversation! :p

I know one thing, my tent doesn't lay in a heap in the dirt on the ground once I stake it out. I derive comfort from the fact if I'm climbing up 4,000' to the top of a mountain that if a sudden thunderstorm comes, my tent won't be flapping around in the wind while being pounded by rain and most likely mud, back many miles away from where I could very likely be.

I could care less the type of tent you personally have or how fast you can put it up or down. It was a consideration directed to the OP's question.

Moving on!


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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

[/QUOTE]Considering the variety of tarp tent designs, that generalization doesn't hold up too well.  Many of them pitch about the same way as regular tent.   Even  those that don't can go up quickly.  The Contrail takes 2-3 minutes once you get the hang of it.  Franco's record is quite a bit better than that.[QUOTE]
This is true, but it still doesn't change my preference.
On my last backpacking trip out, I snapped a trekking pole an hour in, of a 3 day trip.
If I had used a tarp tent, that would have been a problem. Sure, I could have rigged it, but I'm really just too rough on trekking poles to rely on them.
I've been in tarp tents I liked well enough, but at the end of the day, I've always liked traditional tents more.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ May 24 2013, 11:22 pm)
QUOTE
[/QUOTE]Considering the variety of tarp tent designs, that generalization doesn't hold up too well.  Many of them pitch about the same way as regular tent.   Even  those that don't can go up quickly.  The Contrail takes 2-3 minutes once you get the hang of it.  Franco's record is quite a bit better than that.[QUOTE]
This is true, but it still doesn't change my preference.
On my last backpacking trip out, I snapped a trekking pole an hour in, of a 3 day trip.
If I had used a tarp tent, that would have been a problem. Sure, I could have rigged it, but I'm really just too rough on trekking poles to rely on them.
I've been in tarp tents I liked well enough, but at the end of the day, I've always liked traditional tents more.

There are a lot of tarp tents that don't require trekking poles.  I'm not trying to convince you that tarp tents are better, but you should be more specific.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 24 2013, 11:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like traditional tents too...My Golite Shangri-La 5 is basically just a glorified Tepee.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 12:28 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 11:04 pm)
QUOTE

(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 10:41 pm)
QUOTE

(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 9:46 pm)
QUOTE

(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 8:59 pm)
QUOTE
8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

? OK, using the scenario he used (leaving tent in a heap on the ground) and your out hiking for the day. A thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a bunch of rain. You come back and the tent we are taking about which is basically a tarp will not be wet, muddied and collect debris?
Over thinking? ???  
Think I would prefer a tent that is taut and erect and pegged down to come back to vs. a tent collapsed in a heap on the ground!

Well, it wouldn't be a heap because you would have left some gear in it.  I am assuming because if you went for a hike carrying all of your gear than why not take the tent.  It is light enough.

If there is a storm that is blowing debris around and enough rain to splash mud then the odds are that your excursion away from your tent was short lived and you made it back in time.  It also means that if you left it erected, it would likely be caked with mud and debris anyway as your scenario implies a nasty, windy storm.

I don't know but honestly, it isn't a big deal.  Most cases I don't take my trekking poles for a day hike away from my shelter.  I simply don't need them if I am not hiking with a full pack.

Regarding the heap on the ground.  Take my Tarptent Notch, for example.  Assuming all I have done is taken the poles out and it is still pegged to the ground, it will take exactly 10 seconds to reset the poles.  From bag to set up, my tarptent goes up in less than one minute.  I bet your tent doesn't.

OK, lets play scenario after scenario so we can can justify our tents because since its my tent, it's perfect and all others are garbage and don't deserve to be in the same conversation! :p

I know one thing, my tent doesn't lay in a heap in the dirt on the ground once I stake it out. I derive comfort from the fact if I'm climbing up 4,000' to the top of a mountain that if a sudden thunderstorm comes, my tent won't be flapping around in the wind while being pounded by rain and most likely mud, back many miles away from where I could very likely be.

I could care less the type of tent you personally have or how fast you can put it up or down. It was a consideration directed to the OP's question.

Moving on!

Where do you trek where there is this issue with flying mud?

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 12:31 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ May 24 2013, 11:22 pm)
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On my last backpacking trip out, I snapped a trekking pole an hour in, of a 3 day trip.

What kind of poles?  Aluminum won't snap, it will just bend. Carbon will.

Maybe you are using the wrong poles.


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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 6:50 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Komperdell trekker poles.
It wasn't the metal that broke, it was the tightening system inside the pole that gave out. It made a very loud "crack" when it went too. Honestly, it was my fought though. I got it hung between two rocks while descending down a steep grade.
They promptly replaced them, no questions asked, which is great.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 9:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have the solo Eureka Spitfire, and when I started taking my son with me, bought the Salida 2 - I personally think side entries are much easier to get in and out of.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 10:23 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(treelinebackpacker @ May 25 2013, 6:50 am)
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Komperdell trekker poles.
It wasn't the metal that broke, it was the tightening system inside the pole that gave out. It made a very loud "crack" when it went too. Honestly, it was my fought though. I got it hung between two rocks while descending down a steep grade.
They promptly replaced them, no questions asked, which is great.

I have been using Black Diamond poles with the Flick Lock system.  It is the most robust locking system available.  Worth a try if your current poles break again.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 11:24 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(FamilyGuy @ May 25 2013, 12:28 am)
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(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 11:04 pm)
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(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 10:41 pm)
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(Buggyboo @ May 24 2013, 9:46 pm)
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(FamilyGuy @ May 24 2013, 8:59 pm)
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8 years using Tarptent type shelters and I have done exactly what Tigerfan indicated and no such issues.  Shelter is waterproof (and mud proof).  You are over thinking this.

? OK, using the scenario he used (leaving tent in a heap on the ground) and your out hiking for the day. A thunderstorm rolls in and dumps a bunch of rain. You come back and the tent we are taking about which is basically a tarp will not be wet, muddied and collect debris?
Over thinking? ???  
Think I would prefer a tent that is taut and erect and pegged down to come back to vs. a tent collapsed in a heap on the ground!

Well, it wouldn't be a heap because you would have left some gear in it.  I am assuming because if you went for a hike carrying all of your gear than why not take the tent.  It is light enough.

If there is a storm that is blowing debris around and enough rain to splash mud then the odds are that your excursion away from your tent was short lived and you made it back in time.  It also means that if you left it erected, it would likely be caked with mud and debris anyway as your scenario implies a nasty, windy storm.

I don't know but honestly, it isn't a big deal.  Most cases I don't take my trekking poles for a day hike away from my shelter.  I simply don't need them if I am not hiking with a full pack.

Regarding the heap on the ground.  Take my Tarptent Notch, for example.  Assuming all I have done is taken the poles out and it is still pegged to the ground, it will take exactly 10 seconds to reset the poles.  From bag to set up, my tarptent goes up in less than one minute.  I bet your tent doesn't.

OK, lets play scenario after scenario so we can can justify our tents because since its my tent, it's perfect and all others are garbage and don't deserve to be in the same conversation! :p

I know one thing, my tent doesn't lay in a heap in the dirt on the ground once I stake it out. I derive comfort from the fact if I'm climbing up 4,000' to the top of a mountain that if a sudden thunderstorm comes, my tent won't be flapping around in the wind while being pounded by rain and most likely mud, back many miles away from where I could very likely be.

I could care less the type of tent you personally have or how fast you can put it up or down. It was a consideration directed to the OP's question.

Moving on!

Where do you trek where there is this issue with flying mud?

Humm, let me see; the outdoors? :p

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 1:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Back to the orginal question. I used the Kelty GM2 for a few years and it was fine, but I traded it for the Alps Mountaineering Zephyr 2, which I think is a much better tent. In fact I think it's the best cheap tent you can buy. Two vestibules, very easy setup, very easy entry, huge doors, excellent head room, and cheap. You can almost always find it somewhere for $100. The Zephyr would be much better than the nonfreestanding Spitfire as well. The quality is much better than you would expect for $100. The Zephyr has zillions of excellent reviews.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 1:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Oh, yes, sorry for the better suggestion of a tarp tent, but I think it is good for the OP to see all of the potential pluses and minuses which is what Buggy and I were trying to do.

I thought the Alps was already discounted because of reviews like this?

"I really want to like this tent. The size, weight, and features (and price, since I found it on S&C) were exactly what I was looking for: 2 doors, 2 vestibule, 2 person, sub 5lbs, fly/footprint option.

The shape makes the tent a little tricky to set-up the first time but once you get the hang of it its fine.

The design is also why there's a big flaw with the tent: when setting up the tent there's a flat triangular area at the top of the rain fly (the orange triangle in Tyler Miller's picture may be the easiest place to see this). Since this area is flat, when it rains water will collect and pool here. Since water is sitting and pooling in one spot it will seep through the fly and drip into the tent. In my case it dripped *directly* onto my face, which is not the most pleasant way to wake up in the middle of the night....I woke up several times in the middle of the night because of the dripping. Each time I woke up I would push up on the giant puddle above my head, getting it to drain off. "

I would want more quality for my hard earned money and if adamant on a poled two skin tent, then the REI Half Dome would be a much better choice.  And it is on sale right now for $149 Here


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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2013, 2:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I hate it when I'm hiking along and all of a sudden there's flying mud...

But seriously, look at the design of the tents closely and imagine it raining hard and windy or snowing with build-up. The rainfly is just as important as the interior. Plenty of guyouts help.

Even on my Golite Shangri-La that is rated for four season use, I added two extra guy-outs because it still wasn't up to my level of comfort for dealing with high winds. Dome tents can have pits and it is something to pay attention to. After about five years, my Sierra Designs Astro CD had a flat area that started dripping because of the flat spot due to a "weakness" in the design.


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