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Topic: Footwear Advice, Will I be fine with hiking shoes?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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a1sterling Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 1:28 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi everyone, in August, I'll be traveling to Central/South America for two months. For the first month I'll be taking a daily spanish immersion class in Nicaragua and then we'll spend 10 days in Peru and about a month in Colombia. In Nicaragua, we'll probably do some mild weekend hikes and in Peru we plan to do some short treks around Machu Picchu. In Colombia, we are planning on doing a more strenuous hike, possibly the 5-day Ciudad Perdida trek in the north of the country.  

I currently own, and have broken in, a pair of Oboz Sawtooth hiking shoes (non-waterproof version). My question is, do you think I'll be fine with those for the above hikes, or do I need to invest in a more substantial pair of hiking boots? I also plan on bringing a pair of water shoes for river crossings etc., but I'd like to avoid buying, packing/carrying, and breaking in a pair of hiking boots. Thanks for your thoughts!
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eggs Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 1:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No one can tell you for sure what is best for you. But low top trail runner shoes are all I hike in any more in most situations.

If the shoes you have are comfortable and fit well why not. I googled for an image of the shoes you listed and they sure look like they would work fine.

Have a fun trip


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leadbelly2550 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 1:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

you will always be able to make do.  if you carry a lot of weight on a 5 day hike, you mind find your feet getting tired in shoes that light weight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 2:09 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you've been using the Oboz shoes, and they've supported you well on other hikes and trips of similar magnitude, you'll be fine.  You'd probably be much happier, in fact, than buying a last-minute boot purchase and hoping it does better for you.

For what it's worth, I took a pair of the exact same shoes (Oboz Sawtooth, non-WP) and wore 'em for a month, bushwhacking off-trail under a 70-lb load through the Tongass National Forest in Alaska while crossing the length of Baranof Island there (an AP article about the 2nd half of the trip here).  My feet & ankles fared just fine, although the shoes were obliterated by the end of the trip.  They're not the most durable shoes on the planet, but I wouldn't hesitate to use them again, for what it's worth.

Again, if you're confident your feet & ankles will handle it in those shoes, I wouldn't hesitate, personally.  Although everyone's different, so I can't say with 100% confidence for you.  Just my $.02 anwway.

- Mike


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a1sterling Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 06 2013, 2:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for your thoughts everyone!
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prairiechicken Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 09 2013, 8:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

i haven't worn boots for the past few years. found a pair of 5:10 hiking shoes (camp 4) that i love. they have a unique rubber sole. apparently it's so hard to make they haven't bothered to patent it. they grip rock well, even if wet. vibram soles, on the other hand, become very slippery when wet. after nearly braining myself rock hopping i decided enough was enough. as is common with shoes, they make some changes from year to year. i liked the last model so much that i bought two pair and the second one is still in the box.

people will try to tell you that you need sturdy boots to keep your feet dry or to save your ankles. if you are in a downpour, nothing is keeping your feet dry and boots take longer to dry out. you can wrench your ankle just as easily in boots, i've found. also, since i started using poles a few years ago, i'm not as worried about my ankles because the poles help stabilize. invest in some good wool socks (i prefer smartwool and similar products) and wear liners.
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SmokeyBear Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 10 2013, 11:38 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(prairiechicken @ Jun. 09 2013, 8:04 pm)
QUOTE
i haven't worn boots for the past few years. found a pair of 5:10 hiking shoes (camp 4) that i love. they have a unique rubber sole. apparently it's so hard to make they haven't bothered to patent it. they grip rock well, even if wet. vibram soles, on the other hand, become very slippery when wet. after nearly braining myself rock hopping i decided enough was enough. as is common with shoes, they make some changes from year to year. i liked the last model so much that i bought two pair and the second one is still in the box.

people will try to tell you that you need sturdy boots to keep your feet dry or to save your ankles. if you are in a downpour, nothing is keeping your feet dry and boots take longer to dry out. you can wrench your ankle just as easily in boots, i've found. also, since i started using poles a few years ago, i'm not as worried about my ankles because the poles help stabilize. invest in some good wool socks (i prefer smartwool and similar products) and wear liners.

I agree with you on your points r.e. boots (in general) being no better for ankles than shoes. My experience is that the more the footwear raises you off the ground, the more arch support it provides, and the more it raises your heel relative to the toes, the more likely I am to turn an ankle. In other words, the more the foot is prevented from being able to move to accomodate uneven terrain and the less it is able to sense that terrain due to lack of tactile feedback, the more unstable I become. I am most stable in low, flat shoes, but find the lack of support tiring for the feet. So it's a trade-off for me. But I have low volume, flexible monkey feet - I am disturbing capable of picking things up with them. So for people with thicker and stiffer feet this extra support underneath may not be as much of a detriment. However raised heels, while stability inducing on flat surfaces, are just inherently unstable on uneven terrain.

However I respectfully disagree about the waterproofing aspect. No matter the downpour, wet vegetation, and number of puddles I step in, my goretex boots along with short nylon gaiters absolutely keep my feet dry all day long. Sweaty, but not soaking like using non-WP footwear would make it. If I were doing a lot of stream crossings over the ankle that might change, but fortunately anything deep usually has a bridge of sorts here (however rotted and rickety it might be).
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AlmostThere Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 10 2013, 12:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have never had wetter feet for longer than with goretex shoes.

Will never wear them except in winter.

Goretex shoes created a perfect storm - I will never bother with them again, since I would rather not go through the horrible foot fungus that resulted after trying them for 3 season hiking.

Last weekend I hiked through six creeks in my not-goretex hikers. My socks were dry at the end of the day. Magically, I had no blisters and no fungus flair up, after 14 miles of being driven through creeks by mosquito hordes. I don't buy the hype, and I never shall....


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SmokeyBear Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 10 2013, 7:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I totally agree that once they get wet inside (e.g. due to creek crossings) goretex is terrible for staying wet and will make you thoroughly miserable! I'm just saying that as long as I am not in a situation where they take in outside moisture through the top my feet keep much drier than using a non WP shoe through wet conditions. Plus you keep that trail mud funk out - the trails here are usually very muddy in the spring and fall and it permanently imbeds in the shoe. Also it's usually too cold at night for things to dry out much. Maybe if it was in the summer heat and very warm overnight I might feel differently. I usually only am doing day hikes in the summer, so my boots get dried out at camp overnight.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 18 2013, 3:40 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1 on the gaiters. They provide a wider range of usability without much of a weight penalty (summer gaiters).
Keep dirt, rocks, & debris out. Protect from ticks. Keep stickers out of socks. Can keep water out. Nylon drys fast and cleans easy.
They do heat up more on a hot day but generally worth the trade off for me.
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