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Topic: Tarp instead of fly< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 28 2013, 6:04 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Anyone ever use a tarp instead of a fly in hot, humid weather?  Temperature seems to go up about 30 degrees with the fly on.

Disadvantages of a tarp: wind-blow rain and heavier than a fly.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 28 2013, 9:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Apparently, there are some people out there who think it's a good idea:


From the Moontrail website - the page on the "mesh inner" for the Unna - I think this picture came from the Hilleberg catalog.
http://www.moontrail.com/hilleberg-unna-mesh-inner.php

Tarps are also pretty useful as vestibules and cook areas alone, or over a tent entrance in inclement weather. Let's face it: a tent is the "device" we use to provide for the possibility of inclement weather. A great deal of the time, the weather won't require a fly or a cover of any kind. At least one of the few disadvantages of the single wall design - you can't take the fly off.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 28 2013, 10:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I like that photo,Gabby! Exactly what I had in mind.

Re weather: When it's hot and humid the likelihood of an afternoon or evening thunderstorm is very high. I just spent two miserable days in a tent and most of the time at night I wasn't able to unzip the fly door when it was raining. I noticed that everything under a pitched tarp outside my tent stayed dry and that made me want to move the tent under the tarp.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 29 2013, 1:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I set up my 5' by 8.5' Equinox Poncho-Tarp in the same configuration as above, except lower.

Along with a 3' by 4' peice of silver Mylar as a floor, (2 oz.)...so I don't have to kneel down in mud to enter my tent... I end up with a nice dry "front porch," for cooking or just hanging around.

Beats being tent-bound in multi-day rains. It shelters the front entrance of my tent, and it costs very little in extra weight because the poncho-tarp, (8.5 oz.) is my entire rain-gear for hiking and I would be carrying it anyway.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 29 2013, 12:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Drifter, do you also carry the fly and keep it ready to throw over the tent in case of wind-driven rain? That would be my biggest worry.

Do you find that the tarp makes a big difference in the temperature inside your tent?

I wonder whether tent design is responsive to climate change. Years ago I never ever thought about the quantity of mesh in a tent. The Eureka Timberline that was solid fabric on three sides seemed fine in those bygone days when I always carried a sleeping bag in summer (now I never do, just a light cotton quilt).
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 29 2013, 1:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Why not just use a inner net with a tarp? Much lighter then a tent and way more options. U can just use the inner net on warm buggy nights..when its not buggy u can use it as a ground cloth and lay out cowboy camping..if its gonna rain or snow use the tarp over it..in winter or colder non.buggy weather leave the innernet home and just pitch the tarp....

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 29 2013, 11:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well, it all depends on where you camp. For me, it's mostly 11 to 12,000 ft. around treeline in the Rockies. At this altitude you can expect nightly temps in the 30's, with an occasional unexpected dip into the teens, always accompanied by
constant wind, 24/7.

So I've never owned a mesh tent with a fly.. Solid-wall, single-wall tents with good ventilation work best here because they not only protect you from the bugs, but from the screaming, roaring, frozen winds that blow unimpeded across the high tundra.

(I can't even dream of spending a night wrapped in just a blanket while camping up here.)

But in the daytime, despite the bombardment of the million-laser high-altitude sun,
my tent stays cool under the poncho-tarp, because, essentially, my tent is always pitched in the shade.

I think this will work for you, staying ultralight and comfortable at any altitude or weather condition.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 02 2013, 11:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

How about the Equinox Egret?

http://www.amazon.com/Equinox....uct_top
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 28 2013, 3:07 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have this from Granite Gear:

http://www.basegear.com/granite-gear-haven-bug-tent.html

But it is heavier than listed.
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