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Topic: Cook Pot, for Cat Stove< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 11:25 am  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hey Guys,

As you know I'm trying to assemble some gear as a new light/ultralight backpacker.

I just made a cat stove and was wondering what you guys recommend as a pot.

I'll need one big enough to boil water and then mix in some dehydrated food.

Thanks, Joe
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 11:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You also need one sized to your cat stove. I tend to have a cup of hot liquid along with my dinner so I prefer a .9 liter size. I would tend to go wider with a cat stove. Ti is my material of choice for a pot for just boiling. I love the Evernew brand (also has the little pour divot). Not cheap but danged light.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 12:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Most cat food stoves will have a burn flame that is best utilized by a pot of at least 5.78 inches wide.  The common .9L pots and tea kettles are about that size.  Some folks swear by aluminum, others by Ti.  I use a $20 tea kettle I found at REI.  There is a grease pot in Wally World type stores that others have found useful, and it is cheap.  

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 1:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Wide is good.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 9:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(ol-zeke @ Jul. 08 2013, 12:30 pm)
QUOTE
Some folks swear by aluminum, others by Ti.

Wasn't there a thread about that recently?   :D

Forget your cat stove.  Get one of zelph's starlyte stoves for $12.  Its lighter, won't spill because the fuel is held in a wicking material, and pretty efficient.  I use mine with a Caldera cone but I had good results before with just a windscreen.  I use the same 0.9L Evernew pot Tigger recommended.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 9:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes, forget what you want, do what someone else wants.

My cat stove works fine, and it's free. And making another makes my cat like me better.

Of course, with the total fire ban throughout the Sierra, I won't be using the alcohol stoves for a long time... hopefully we'll be back to more typical water/snow levels soon.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 08 2013, 10:11 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've got an REI TI pot 0.9 L that works great on a cat stove.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 2:47 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Walmart Grease Pot is the classic UL cookpot, 3 oz. with lid, $5. I used one for a decade. If all you are doing is boiling water, this is all you'll ever need. (You grip it with a bandana.)

For more sophisticated versions, check out AntiGravity Gear
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 7:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Definitely wide-bottomed.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 10:04 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(TDale @ Jul. 09 2013, 4:08 am)
QUOTE
Definitely wide-bottomed.

You're just desperate to get in the OCC...

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 12:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I looked for a long time for the Wal-Mart grease pot.  I did find one 2-3 yrs ago in an unusual spot in the store, (not in pots and pans, nears colanders & such), but I cannot seem to find one when I do stop in to restock on fishing gear.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 1:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For solo, I think the 3-cup Open Country hard-anodized pot is hard to beat for price and weight:
http://www.traildesigns.com/cookwar....zed-pot

For two, the GSI kettle:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Halulite-Kettle-Ounce/dp/B0018BLKOU

If cost doesn't matter, there are bazillion Evernew and Snow peak titanium pots out there.  I'm partial to the MSR Titan because I've had it forever and it's a nice size/shape for one, but it's certainly not the lightest one any more.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 3:13 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used "sit on top" stoves for a while, but went back to my old Pepsi can alky stove that uses a windscreen potstand. I never liked the lack of stability of the pot on top of any of those "side burner" stoves, though I never really had a spill of consequence.

Back a few months ago, Tinny at MBD created a remote feeder for his micro version of the Whitebox style side burner. The stove didn't last very long, but the most useful thing I got out of its purchase was an auxiliary wire stand that was cut just below the level of the lip of the "sit on top/side burner" stove. Made the pot a lot more stable. Tinny subsequently discontinued both the stove and the stand, but I think it would be a great idea to have for larger pots on cat stoves and other "side burners". Just a millimeter or so is sufficient to keep the pot on the stove and the stove sealed, while providing a margin of stability.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 4:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The great think about a caldera cone is that it provides stability as well as a windscreen.  The original aluminum version is only $30 but the $100 for a Ti Sidewinder which can pack into my pot for storage was well worth it.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 4:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(HikeClimbBike @ Jul. 09 2013, 3:14 pm)
QUOTE
The great think about a caldera cone is that it provides stability as well as a windscreen.  The original aluminum version is only $30 but the $100 for a Ti Sidewinder which can pack into my pot for storage was well worth it.

If I've learned anything by buying and making many, many more stoves than I'll ever use, it's that there is no one stove that is "perfect", no matter how much some people are attached to their particular brand or model.

I made the little Pepsi can stove I use about 9 years ago, in the "penny stove" style, with fiberglass insulation inside. Most of my reason for using that particular stove comes down to the fact that I made it, I've used it so often that I know exactly what it's going to do, and it's never failed me. It, and its windscreen/stand, may look like a POS to anyone else, but I love it. If I intend to do anything other than heat water or go with others, however, I'll bring along something else.

I also have a strange fondness for the Primus Express Spider, but that has more to do with a particular overcast morning, lying in the bag reading for an extra hour or so while my water for breakfast heated, and a brilliant sunrise at just the right time.

Not everything has to be rational.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 6:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gabby @ Jul. 09 2013, 4:27 pm)
QUOTE

(HikeClimbBike @ Jul. 09 2013, 3:14 pm)
QUOTE
The great think about a caldera cone is that it provides stability as well as a windscreen.  The original aluminum version is only $30 but the $100 for a Ti Sidewinder which can pack into my pot for storage was well worth it.

If I've learned anything by buying and making many, many more stoves than I'll ever use, it's that there is no one stove that is "perfect", no matter how much some people are attached to their particular brand or model.

I made the little Pepsi can stove I use about 9 years ago, in the "penny stove" style, with fiberglass insulation inside. Most of my reason for using that particular stove comes down to the fact that I made it, I've used it so often that I know exactly what it's going to do, and it's never failed me. It, and its windscreen/stand, may look like a POS to anyone else, but I love it. If I intend to do anything other than heat water or go with others, however, I'll bring along something else.

I also have a strange fondness for the Primus Express Spider, but that has more to do with a particular overcast morning, lying in the bag reading for an extra hour or so while my water for breakfast heated, and a brilliant sunrise at just the right time.

Not everything has to be rational.

Gabby,

Thanks for replying to my thread..

What kind of windscreen/stand do you use??

Joe
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 09 2013, 10:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My setup is not appropriate for a cat stove (the ostensible topic here), but, since you asked: the windscreen is just a simple cylindrical thing I cut out of the bottom of a throw-away turkey roasting pan. I made flaps on the end to hold it together, indented one side for the handles of my SP Trek 700 (cut and fold method), and punched holes in the sides to hold a straightened super large paper clip, which is shaped with a "U" in one end to keep it in place. I never thought the paper clip would last, but it's still there after 9 years. I once made a similar windscreen and used a Ti tent stake, but the paper clip is plenty strong enough if you want a "dedicated" piece to use. I suppose a piece of wire hanger would more than do the job also.

The Trek 700 rests on its own handles and on the paper clip over my simple Pepsi can alcohol stove. The "bottom" of the windscreen is the metal end of a discarded paper cookie container that I use as a primer pan for the stove. I light the primer through the ventilation holes in the bottom of the windscreen. Can't see the flames most times, but you can usually hear the "phump" of it lighting if it's quiet enough. If I ever have problems in the wind, I just thread a "wick" of vaselined cotton through one of the vent holes, or use a match, both of which I usually carry anyway.

I'll try to get pictures, but it's really not all that big a deal. The most important thing is testing the stove and pot combo to get a good idea how far above the stove you want the pot, and how much air needs to be allowed to burn efficiently. Mine probably runs a bit hot most of the time, but I can adjust the windscreen out a bit.

There are much simpler ways to go, and the cat stove and Whitebox-like stoves are certainly simpler, and also more robust. I can send pictures, though it's not all that complex.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 10 2013, 7:39 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gabby @ Jul. 09 2013, 10:27 pm)
QUOTE
My setup is not appropriate for a cat stove (the ostensible topic here), but, since you asked: the windscreen is just a simple cylindrical thing I cut out of the bottom of a throw-away turkey roasting pan. I made flaps on the end to hold it together, indented one side for the handles of my SP Trek 700 (cut and fold method), and punched holes in the sides to hold a straightened super large paper clip, which is shaped with a "U" in one end to keep it in place. I never thought the paper clip would last, but it's still there after 9 years. I once made a similar windscreen and used a Ti tent stake, but the paper clip is plenty strong enough if you want a "dedicated" piece to use. I suppose a piece of wire hanger would more than do the job also.

The Trek 700 rests on its own handles and on the paper clip over my simple Pepsi can alcohol stove. The "bottom" of the windscreen is the metal end of a discarded paper cookie container that I use as a primer pan for the stove. I light the primer through the ventilation holes in the bottom of the windscreen. Can't see the flames most times, but you can usually hear the "phump" of it lighting if it's quiet enough. If I ever have problems in the wind, I just thread a "wick" of vaselined cotton through one of the vent holes, or use a match, both of which I usually carry anyway.

I'll try to get pictures, but it's really not all that big a deal. The most important thing is testing the stove and pot combo to get a good idea how far above the stove you want the pot, and how much air needs to be allowed to burn efficiently. Mine probably runs a bit hot most of the time, but I can adjust the windscreen out a bit.

There are much simpler ways to go, and the cat stove and Whitebox-like stoves are certainly simpler, and also more robust. I can send pictures, though it's not all that complex.

Pictures would be great..

I made a soda can stove today..

I see there is a difference between it and the cat food can stove...

I like both..

Thanks, Joe
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 10 2013, 12:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Here's a few pictures I took last night (looks like I duplicated at least one, or the "collage maker" just threw it in twice to "balance" the layout):

On the bottom middle picture, you can see the tabs and the metal lid I use as a primer pan to start the stove. Note the small indentation on one side for the Trek 700 handles.

To the right of that, I put the whole thing together and propped the Trek 700 on top, though this picture shows that I missed a bit and the windscreen is wedged between the pot and its handles. Doesn't make much difference, even though the pot is tilted slightly, but when I go to remove the pot, the windscreen may very well come along with it unless I recognize what I did here.

You can see the stove, a simple Pepsi can stove (though this one is obviously a Coke can - pure heresy) done in the "penny stove" style, though I use a quarter instead of a penny. I kept losing the penny, and the quarter is slightly heavier and works a bit better - or I think it does.

The rest of the pictures are simply attempts to give you a better view of the different components.

In the top left pictures, you see how the windscreen fits into the cozy I usually carry, which is made from Reflectix insulation you can find at Lowes or Home Depot in small "hobby rolls". Then the pot fits inside of the windscreen, though very snugly. This way the relatively fragile windscreen won't easily get damaged. Everything else, including an extra stove, an MBD M5 carbon wick stove which I use for slow baking and actual cooking. I don't always carry it, but there's room. Without the extra stove, I can carry a couple days' worth of alcohol in a small bottle.

Keep in mind that most of this was arrived at after a lot of experimentation, and is somewhat whimsical, since I just decided "enough" and quit tinkering - the result is what you see here. The pin upon which the pot rests has a crook, but I also used one that was simply bent a bit on each end to keep it from slipping out, and that worked just about as well. This is just where I stopped playing with things about 9 or 10 years ago.

I'll try to find my much simpler White Box stove, and illustrate that setup for comparison. There are a lot of choices, and many of them are very inexpensive.

I'd like to second the recommendation by TigerFan above:
QUOTE
For solo, I think the 3-cup Open Country hard-anodized pot is hard to beat for price and weight:
http://www.traildesigns.com/cookwar....zed-pot


This is a great little pot, and doesn't cost much. Some years ago, perhaps when they were discontinuing the set, I found the "Scout" 5 piece set on Amazon for less than $10.

I bought 2. Sadly, it's not available anymore.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 13 2013, 3:43 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Man, there is a lot to pick from..

I've been looking at this

I like the idea of having a pot and a mug..

Any other ideas??

Thanks
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