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Topic: cleaning tree resin from clothes, best way without ruining the material?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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JRinGeorgia Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 5:11 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi all, just back from a 9-day trek in Yosemite, I had a great time but my clothes not so much. In particular one set got tree resin on it, both the pants and the shirt (both are Columbia Silver Ridge). Have run them through the wash and used stain spray beforehand on the trouble spots, but as I suspected would happen the resin is still there.

I've used alky fuel to remove pitch in spot applications, not sure if this is the best method or if anyone has a different suggestion. Also I'm a little concerned that too much use of alky could damage the material. Any advice appreciated.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 5:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've used rubbing alcohol with no ill effects in the past and works well (but basically the same thing as Denatured alcohol).

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 6:14 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks Tigger, just wasn't sure if there is something better to use and/or if fabric damage would be an issue. I have some 90% isopropyl, will try that unless someone jumps in with a different idea. Thanks!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 6:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've used Goof OFF or WD 40 and then immediately washed it with detergent like ERA and gotten it off.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 6:42 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have some Goof-Off, and of course who doesn't have WD40, I had thought of those as perhaps more harsh than alky on the fabric, I'll turn to them if the alky doesn't work. Thanks!

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 9:24 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Like others I have used denatured alcohol to get sap out of my backpacking pants and it worked great without any damage to the material.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 10:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've also done the trick where you freeze the item of clothing so the resin is hard and then break as much off as possible and then I scrape with a knife the rest that I can off and then use the Goof Off.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 30 2013, 11:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've had good luck with WD40 before.  Just use it sparingly and wash it out immediately after.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 10:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

WD-40 would probably be a last choice, and won't work as well as goof-off. Alcohol is ok (and safest for fabrics and people alike) but non-polar solvents like xylene, toluene, brake cleaner (both chlorinated and non-chlorinated), white gas, etc will work much better. But some synthetic fabrics may be damaged by non-polar solvents. Never use solvents on treated fabrics such as those with DWR or sil-nylon. I wouldn't even use alcohol on those, they will strip the coatings right off.

Brake cleaner evaporates quickly and cleanly - white gas will leave some residues that need washing out. WD-40 will leave oils behind that will require using scrubbing with detergent to properly remove. Do NOT use solvents in the sink (except alcohol, that one is fine) - it contaminates the waste water and isn't cleanly removed during treatment. Especially the chlorinated brake cleaner, which is highly toxic to aquatic life and denser than water so it contaminates it much worse. Instead, Use it on a hard surface like a driveway so that the fluid evaporates rather than absorbs into the soil or goes down a sink. Hydrocarbons are rapidly degraded in the atmosphere.

1- freeze and try to break off and remove as much physically as possible first
2- saturate with solvent (alcohol or other) and rub gently with a soft brush to help it dissolve
3- repeat step 2, rinsing with extra solvent to help remove it until gone

Let dry thoroughly before washing. Again, don't put any solvent into waste water.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 10:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Mineral Spirits.

Or Technu, which is mineral spirits with mild soap.


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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 4:25 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The resin will burn pretty well, just sayin'. :D



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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 7:26 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've used the freezing method, dry ice works great

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 31 2013, 9:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Isopropyl (Rubbing) alcohol does the trick with out leaving any residue.  90 - 100% works best.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2013, 1:57 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I live in large evergreen woods. Generally use mechanics hand soap for most things. Seems pretty mild relative to a number of the things mentioned above. I have used it on funky work clothes so have not paid much attention to what it does to clothing.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 01 2013, 8:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(OverUnder @ Jul. 31 2013, 9:18 pm)
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Isopropyl (Rubbing) alcohol does the trick with out leaving any residue.  90 - 100% works best.

^ This has always worked for me.  You can also use most hand sanitizers as they are mostly alcohol.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 02 2013, 3:01 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks all for the suggestions. I started with what I have on hand, isopropyl 91%, and with some elbow work it is taking the pitch off and not seeming to harm the fabric. It is leaving a stain where the pitch was, like a grease stain, I'll see if that will come out in a second washing.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 02 2013, 3:56 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Isopropyl will take a little more elbow grease as you noted as it doesn't dissolve oils very well compared to solvents like brake cleaner. But it's a lot less damaging to fabrics and environmentally friendly. I'm sure with a bit more work it will come clean.
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16 replies since Jul. 30 2013, 5:11 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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