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Topic: Is an axe a useful thing to carry?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 13 2013, 11:09 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Dear all,

I have been giving some thought to the idea of taking an axe camping with me. I know lots of us take survival knives but I have read a few reviews from people who talk about it as being an essential bit of kit.

What is everyone's thoughts about the axe as a camping accessory? Would it's use justify the 3lb or so extra weight?


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 13 2013, 11:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Camped much?  Needed an axe much?

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 13 2013, 11:21 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

AXE?

No.

I do not take a survival knife either - if you mean those big ol' blades that are generally worthless for the things I usually do, like cut food or clean fish. They're pretty worthless in general.

I've seen people bring hatchets but never use them. If you can't break the wood without a blade, it's too big to use in the first place. Look up Leave No Trace and have mercy on the rest of us - no one needs a bonfire.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 13 2013, 11:22 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Backpacking? Gods no.

Even, say, lake canoeing with no portages in actual forest country a folding saw is a lot more useful. And you're a lot less likely to get horribly injured with a saw.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

They never say never, but when backpacking, I'd say never. Bit ridiculous, actually.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:07 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

For backpacking? No way.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:55 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I bought..(not cheap) Gransfor Bruks  small axe/hatchet and love it. for the past 2 years. I can shave with it or filet fish, or cut wood. Weapon? ask your self. My lil  axe is a keeper. great forged steeland will keep a edge. We won't talk about knives.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I guess reading the question is just way too much trouble.
An axe may be useless for backpacking, but camping? Sure, if I want a fire, and there's available wood to split. Car camping, especially, I'd take one, but I only do that about once or twice a year.
Pretty rare, but every now and then I'll even take a Gransfors Bruks small Forest Axe on an overnighter if I expect to do some trail clearing in an area that hasn't seen much use lately, and has had storms. A saw is better for carrying, but an axe is a lot faster on small stuff, and makes easy work of limbing deadfalls of reasonable size, since I can have a 4-5" branch off before a cut could even get started with a saw. I don't have the patience to screw around with a saw for long when hiking(hate the things, really).

Ha, knew there was a pic of it somewhere.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 7:20 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I never carry an ax or hatchet but have in the past carried a 12"bladed Bowie.

It was some serious offtrail trips lasting several weeks and was actually very useful. I could gut a fish, skin and butcher game, plus clear trail and cut down small trees, carve stuff and split wood.

Now? No.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 8:17 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No, not worth the weight.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 10:56 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(johnq62 @ Sep. 14 2013, 12:55 am)
QUOTE
I bought..(not cheap) Gransfor Bruks  small axe/hatchet and love it. for the past 2 years. I can shave with it or filet fish, or cut wood. Weapon? ask your self. My lil  axe is a keeper. great forged steeland will keep a edge. We won't talk about knives.

Each to his own.  HYOH.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:39 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

HYOH yes but...in the Sierra, no! What for?

I was in the Yosemite permit line behind someone sporting both a 12 inch Bowie on one hip and a hatchet on the other...
...much laughter from the Ranger.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 12:48 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 1:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(markskor @ Sep. 14 2013, 12:39 pm)
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someone sporting both a 12 inch Bowie on one hip and a hatchet on the other...
...much laughter from the Ranger.

Love those guys almost as much as those guys packing a huge pistol on their hip so everyone can see it. Again, much laughter.

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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 1:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Even car-camping I don't see much point, at least in the west, because cutting firewood is usually illegal around campgrounds.  Frankly,on the rare occasions we have a fire (I hate the pall of smoke that hangs over most campgrounds) we just gather unburned and half-burned wood from unused camps, right out of the fire pits (no, not from other people's camps--from the ones that have been abandoned!).  

Backpacking?  Well, I almost never BP anywhere fires are legal, and can't imagine adding 3 lbs to my pack for something like that even if they were.  I suppose it might have some value in a survival situation, but in 30years of backpacking I've never needed one, and can't think of many situations where I'd have the axe but not the rest of my pack, with much more effective shelter!


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 1:35 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The first BPing trip I was on one guy insisted on bringing an axe. Five lbs of dead weight. He was carrying it. Was the mostly useless piece of gear brought by far, and I ended up having to shoulder it on the way back. That axe would have been left in the buhs if it didn't have sentimental value to the guy who brought it in (his deceased father's axe).

I think there are circumstances when a small lightweight hatchet could be useful such as for prolonged winter camping where fires are important, but for splitting wood for small campfires in the main BPing season I've never had a problem with using a lightweight saw or even a knife to baton pieces of wood.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 6:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

That is valuable Weight that could be used on Rum or MM's. Prioritize what you really need to survive.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 9:03 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Dear all,

I think the answer to your question, Opening Gambit, lies in another question: what sort of camping are you planning on doing?

If you are an ultralight backpacker (am guessing you are not because otherwise you wouldn't be asking the question) the answer is that you can easily get by without one.

However, I actually think that an axe is a good tool to have.  My Gransfor Bruks small forest axe (click on link to read a review) is a cracking bit of kit and weighs in at 1kg. It has a variety of uses:
1. You can EASILY split wood. This is really useful if you are trying to make kindling and its been really wet. You can expose dry wood which is great

2. You can offset some of the weight by sacking off your tent pole and pegs and using your axe to make them. I use a Golite Shangri-la 5 and instead of bringing a tent pole and pegs, I make them and this offsets 500kg (put a sock or something on top of the pole). You can use the pole as a walking aid or wading stick in the day.

3. You can make cool tools with an axe. If you are interested it would be well worth your while considering going on a carving course where you can learn how to carve some neat stuff with you axe.

4. You can make shelter, a bow, and even a coracle if you are into that sort of thing. You can make a cracking tripod or spit roast for food

5. It is a useful hammer

If you are interested there are a couple of useful articles for you to read:

How to choose an axe

How to maintain an axe


Does anyone else have any other uses for a camping axe? I would be interested to see what others get up to.

So my summary is this. Have a think about your style of camping. However, do not be so hasty to dismiss the venerable camping axe!

Hope this is useful.

OB
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 9:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry guys my pole and pegs do not weigh 500kg! I mean 500g!!
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 9:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Just not that interested in impacting the country I travel through to the extent all that axe-work would leave behind. Personal quirk but when I glance back at my campsite I want to be able to not see where I'd been rather than a site littered with discarded wood tools, pegs and stumps of saplings cut down for poles and staffs.

So, yes, what sort of camping are you planning on doing and what sort of condition are you planning on leaving behind on the land and landscape when you're done for the next visitors to find?
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 14 2013, 10:15 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

xe or hatchet when out bping but do when out canoeing in BWCA. I also carry a lt wt folding saw when out canoeing. But getting back to bping I find that you can usually find plenty of wood without having to cut any or split it. I usually get pieces small enough to break with my foot or over my knee. Which means something around wrist size.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 15 2013, 12:18 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I sometimes take one for car camping, after a spot in the Canadian Rockies apparently had been harden for durability, and amazingly there were no rocks around.  The bugs were some what annoying so I think was swearing and a guy came over with a mallet.  I don't have a mallet, but still have some axes for when I used to canoe came in Ontario, used it to put points on sticks for stakes, shaped poles for canvas tent, cooked on an open fire.  Not much impact really in a place you would be lucky (or unlucky) to see anyone for 2 weeks (at least back in the 70s.  

Still can't remember actually using it as an ax (when car camping), but that is an option that a hammer doesn't have.



But after that on a backpack trip to Alaska I was dissuaded from an axe.   I do wonder about the ban on collecting wood, when they pay folks to collect the wood nearby and burn it for fire prevention.  I suppose they is a difference in the amount collected etc.

I did get a wood stove that uses just sticks but don't find many places too use it.
I usually find that out the hard way, usually not allowed above certain elevations that I like to camp in.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 15 2013, 12:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In my neck of the woods, an ax is not necessary. I could see carrying one maybe in the thick Alaska bush, or perhaps in Canada's wilderness.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 15 2013, 11:03 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It has taken ten months for trails to get clear in many of the parks in WV, VA, MD, & PA from massive hurricane damage. NPS funding has been cut so drastically that it falls on the hiker to do their part & help maintain trails when necessary.

Depending on trail conditions, absolutely.


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(spac3man @ Sep. 15 2013, 10:03 am)
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NPS funding has been cut so drastically that it falls on the hiker to do their part & help maintain trails when necessary.

Depending on trail conditions, absolutely.

I ran into a lot of deadfalls in TN this winter and early spring, when the trails aren't seeing much maintenance. Much as I'd prefer to have that GB in my hand, I'm not high on carrying that thing around, and am thinking about getting a folding saw. Maybe I could at least make some places passable so people aren't making a new trail around every downed tree...
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 15 2013, 4:10 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Are you bushcrafting or backpacking?  Are you an ultimate hiker or ultimate camper or are you just confused?  

For bushcrafting they are great.  You are only walking a mile or three into the woods and setting up a cool camp with fire and a tripod to cook that homemade chili you packed in.  Maybe even setting up a natural material lean-to or making a figure 4 deadfall to catch that rat you probably will not eat.  You are setting up a camp to do buscrafting then an ax is a must if for no other reason than it is a traditional tool to have and to be a bushcrafter you need to know how to use it.  But be careful.  I have seen some very bad accidents from the use of those things.  

For backpacking I never feel the need.  If I have a fire it is a small stick file with sticks that are east to break between two trees.  Like many here I don't carry a big survival knife.  Just one of the smallest swiss army knife they make.  The scissors are what I use most when backpacking.  When backpacking I am trying to get in miles and see as much beauty as I can along the way.  To do that I have gone with the ultralight gear and a ax does not fit into that model.

Become clear in your mind what you are trying to accomplish and you will have the correct ax answer and the answer to a lot of other questions.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 15 2013, 9:27 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

An axe or hatchet is never NEEDED.

Clearly there are people who feel they WANT them, and bring them - annoying the heck out of the rest of us who would very much prefer to sleep at night, or at least gaze at the stars in peace, instead of listening to some guy hack up the woods one tree at a time until 2 am.

Right now there is a fire ban - NO FIRES AT ALL ANYWHERE - in the Sierra. I am reporting people who think backpacking is camping, and camping = bonfire - not just a fire, but a monstrous tower of flame that licks the branches of the trees they camp under. I am reporting them when I get back and the rangers take it very seriously. I also reported the guy who thought a wood stove was somehow exempt from the NO FIRES rule at a lake in Sequoia NP - where there are *never* fires permitted - and was merrily peeling branches out of green pine trees that grow sparsely around the lake (around 9200 ft elevation or so - entitled people who imagine they are the only ones who ever camp there are killing trees like these and they do not come back in our lifetime). The ranger nicely informed him that wood stoves are considered open flame, not stoves, so he needed to stop backpacking with it in a ban.

I NEVER take an axe camping. I bring wood with me. Less work, no need to roam the hillsides searching where 100s of other campers have torn branches off every tree in sight. And no real impact on a heavily impacted forest since I'm burning almond wood instead of wild trees.

Trail maintenance? Saws are better, and if you're maintaining trails, that ranks up there with hunting and gathering for things that keep you from actually backpacking.  Saws don't bounce back off manzanita and hurt you.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 16 2013, 7:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

No axes, please.

It would be nice if people who come here give us a bit of background, first. When someone posts something about carrying an ax backpacking, or about a merino wool sleeping bag, (it happened,) I have to assume that the poster has little or no experience in the sticks and is here to troll.

As for trail maintenance, if you don't know what you're doing, leave it be. A downed tree across a trail can be a death trap. Start hacking at that log, and when it becomes weak enough, it could pop you in the skull and kill you. They have classes and trail maintenance groups.

For cooking, you should need sticks no thicker than your thumb. Even for an ambiance fire, your wrist is plenty thick enough for wood. For that stuff, a folding saw is fine.


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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 16 2013, 9:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi...


                                             Lizzie Bordon and Carrie Nation both carried them.
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PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 16 2013, 9:34 am Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I own a nice Eastwing leather handle hatchet  for use at home....keeps the little kids in line.

I've never taken it with me backpacking though and have not missed it.

OTOH...my friend Peter just bought one last year. Weighs 2-3 lbs...he absolutely loves it and finds it very handy for trimming branches off of deadfall.....which is ok in the ADK's....besides, he ends up burning the whole darn tree anyway.

Me, I could do w/out a fire...but I do no think Peter could.  But then again, Peter brings an Ipad and assorted electronic gear.....I used to bring cigars.

as they say HYOH


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