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Topic: Quilt Temp Range Question, Open end vs foot box< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
george of the j Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2013, 4:20 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I want to buy a quilt and am trying to decide whether to get a 10 or a 20 degree temp rating. I want to use it into the low 30's, but also possibly down to 10 degrees.

I noticed that Enlightened Equipment just came out with a quilt named the Enigma, and this quilt has a permanent footbox. Their Revelation quilt has either an open end or a way to fasten the end into a footbox.

How important is the ability to open the end in regulating heat?

Do you think expecting to be comfortable into the low 30's with a 10 degree quilt is asking too much?

The recent threads on quilts here (which included Ray's essay on quilts for side sleepers) got me interested in a quilt. A month ago I was set on a sleeping bag until reading those threads.

Thank you for any help.

---George
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theo Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 23 2013, 6:49 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I've got a 20° down quilt that I use from the upper 20's to lower 40's. I've been out to about 28° and was comfortable and I'm not a warm sleeper. I got the drawstring footbox as my feet will get hot even though the rest of me is freezing cold.
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george of the j Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2013, 4:17 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks, Theo. It sounds like the drawstring footbox is valuable to you.

I botched up my OP, and should have simply asked: "How important is a drawstring footbox--as opposed to a sewn-shut, fixed footbox--in achieving a wider temperature comfort range?"

---George
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2013, 4:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd be interested to hear some of the answers to this question.  I can say that I own two quilts, and that it was very important to me that I have a drawstring footbox for the added versatility, and yet I have never used either without the footbox formed up.  This would suggest that having a drawstring footbox is not as important as I thought it was.  Many of the most highly regarded quiltmakers (eg, Nunatak, Katabatic) have permanent footboxes.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2013, 4:45 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I would rather have a drawstring footbox than none at all.  My feet are the first thing to get cold and they're also the part for which I have the fewest other insulating options, so I wouldn't mind having a sewn-in footbox.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2013, 4:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used my WM Mitylite as a quilt for a couple of years, but when i bought my quilts, I got sewn footboxs.  If my feet get too warm, I just put them outside of the box for a bit.  I have only done that a couple of times, when it was really too hot for the quilt at all.

I sleep very warm, so I can get away with a 40* quilt for the vast majority of my nights.  I always carry a good base layer, just in case.  Base layer and the quilt have taken me down to 25*.  


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 24 2013, 8:47 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a Jacks R Better Hudson River - two of them, one for under the hammock, one for on top. Both are drawstring footbox quilts. I added a strip of double sided velcro (Omni tape) to the full length of one side of each as well. They are both used as ground quilts, as hammock quilts, and as a full/queen size comforter (when attached) on my bed when the temps drop.

I've used one of them as a blanket while camping - not needing the footbox at warm temps above 55F.


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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 25 2013, 12:08 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

With a quilt I would think that most will have more problems keeping warm in low temps than cool at higher temp.
To keep cool you just sleep almost naked ad with one or both arms and or maybe a leg out.
Now to be comfortable on a typical 10degree quilt at 10 degree you will need to be dry,clean,rested well fed, on top of a similarly rated mat, wearing thermals,gloves socks AND a very warm hat , possibly a balaclava puffy hat about as thick as your quilt so you don't lose too much heat from your neck and head area.
add hydrated as well, but maybe I have forgotten something.
Now IF you can tick all of those 10 points you will be in the "the bag /quilt is accurately rated for me " corner, take away a point at a time and you move progressively  towards the "too cold for me" side.
But that is just my opinion.
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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 25 2013, 12:16 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Franco @ Oct. 25 2013, 12:08 am)
QUOTE
With a quilt I would think that most will have more problems keeping warm in low temps than cool at higher temp.
To keep cool you just sleep almost naked ad with one or both arms and or maybe a leg out.
Now to be comfortable on a typical 10degree quilt at 10 degree you will need to be dry,clean,rested well fed, on top of a similarly rated mat, wearing thermals,gloves socks AND a very warm hat , possibly a balaclava puffy hat about as thick as your quilt so you don't lose too much heat from your neck and head area.
But that is just my oppinion.

Yes, it is.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 25 2013, 11:53 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

i have a thermorest 35* down quilt. rather than a footbox, they're designed to fit over the foot end of your pad. there are snaps along each side to secure it to the pad. i've used it with forecasted lows from the 60s down to the low 30s and was able to adjust simply by how snapped-up i was. the point: even on the warmest summer nights i still had my feet in the footbox.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 25 2013, 1:29 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Franco @ Oct. 25 2013, 12:08 am)
QUOTE
With a quilt I would think that most will have more problems keeping warm in low temps than cool at higher temp.
To keep cool you just sleep almost naked ad with one or both arms and or maybe a leg out.
Now to be comfortable on a typical 10degree quilt at 10 degree you will need to be dry,clean,rested well fed, on top of a similarly rated mat, wearing thermals,gloves socks AND a very warm hat , possibly a balaclava puffy hat about as thick as your quilt so you don't lose too much heat from your neck and head area.
add hydrated as well, but maybe I have forgotten something.
Now IF you can tick all of those 10 points you will be in the "the bag /quilt is accurately rated for me " corner, take away a point at a time and you move progressively  towards the "too cold for me" side.
But that is just my opinion.

Yup - better safe than sorry. Unless you know your limits really well, then it's not worth trying to use under-rated equipment for colder temperatures.

That being said, I was a bit too toasty in a 20-25 degree bag this last weekend in 45 degree weather wearing my nylon pants, a light-weight long-sleeved base-layer, and wool socks. Definitely did some zipper and arms out heat-regulation.
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george of the j Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Oct. 25 2013, 5:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for the advise, everyone. I'm still mulling over which quilt to buy, but I'm not as concerned with the type of footbox now.

---George
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 08 2013, 8:16 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I love the drawstring footbox on my Jacks r Better quilt. My feet tend to get much colder first, so I almost always have the footbox done up. When it is very warm, the option to un-do it is great.
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george of the j Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 08 2013, 10:57 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks, edkras. Too late though; I ordered an EE Enigma with a sewn footbox a week and a half ago.

Hopefully it will be comfortable to use over at least a 25 degree range.

---George
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 09 2013, 3:34 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE


(big_load @ Oct. 24 2013, 4:45 pm)
QUOTE
I would rather have a drawstring footbox than none at all.  My feet are the first thing to get cold and they're also the part for which I have the fewest other insulating options, so I wouldn't mind having a sewn-in footbox.

I just ordered a pair of down mucklucks about 20 minutes ago.  That should cover it for me.

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14 replies since Oct. 23 2013, 4:20 pm < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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