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Topic: Finding the Perfect Backpack, Choosing a Pack< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 04 2013, 10:42 pm  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm looking to buy my first pack.  I've done my research and I've narrowed it down to either the Kelty Lakota 60 or the Osprey Ariel 65.
Between the two I really prefer the Kelty.  It has a couple of small features I like better than the Osprey, and it is about $100 less.
The only problem is that I like that the Osprey's model has the water bladder pouch on an outside pocket of the bag instead of in the main compartment.  I've learned that is a new feature in this year's model of this bag.

My question is does anyone think that Kelty would incorporate this feature into a future model.  And if so when do new models usually come out for Kelty?

Any insight on this would be much appreciated!


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~Jenny


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 04 2013, 10:52 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I wouldn't hold my breath on Kelty changing their approach to bladders.  It doesn't matter all that much, since not having a nice, dedicated pocket isn't much of an obstacle to using a bladder.

In any case, the fit is a lot more important than the features.  I would find someplace you can try them on with weight before deciding.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 04 2013, 10:53 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You've started at the wrong end.

Throw out everything you've learned and go try on packs in person with your gear (or the same volume and weight). A pack is like a pair of shoes. Each one fits your back differently. Narrow it down to three packs that fit you and fit your gear. Your pack will pick itself.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 9:58 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

+1 on what Tigger said.  Bring your gear to the brick and morter. Make sure it all fits IN the pack.  Adjust the pack and walk around with it on.  I didnt take my own advise when choosing my last pack.  I was using a golite 30+10. Bought an Osprey 50. It should all fit with some room to spare. NOT, same gear would not fit so I upsized to a 65 and the same gear list fits...

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 11:36 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Even if the Osprey has a pocket for the bladder, the Kelty probably has a hook or loop to carry a bladder on the inside as well. So you should be able to get the same functionality either way. As for a dedicated outside pocket for the water bladder, no need. In fact, many don't like to have the bladder against their back if it causes the back panel to bulge out, instead carrying it in the pack on top or in a side pocket.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 12:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I use a bladder pouch (not sure what the technical name is) that is clipped to the side of my pack using utility biners. I don't want to risk a leak (not that it should matter because I use drybags inside). I'm apparently paranoid because I also use a pack cover and spray my pack with waterproofing for good measure.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 7:41 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Nov. 04 2013, 10:53 pm)
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You've started at the wrong end.

Throw out everything you've learned and go try on packs in person with your gear (or the same volume and weight). A pack is like a pair of shoes. Each one fits your back differently. Narrow it down to three packs that fit you and fit your gear. Your pack will pick itself.

So this...  try things on!!!!  I do not backpack more then a weekend trip so the HUGE packs are unneeded.  For my 1 to 2 night trips I LOVE my REI Lookout 40..  I went in there with the idea of getting the huge Kelty Trekker 65 external frame (I'm still prefer external over internal, but that's another debate), but after trying many packs on and weighing them down with climbing rope the store I realized I do NOT need a pack that large for over night.  Also, I am not rich.  I am a working lower middle class knuckle dragger so these fancy ass high-end products are not for me.  When just day hiking from my car camping spots I use a REI flash 22.  It was a toss up between that and a Ascend bag from Bass Pro..  Go to many stores as well...  My wife wont even let me go to bass pro or REI with out armed escort anymore...=/  She things things like debt and budgets are important..lol  phhh...women.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 05 2013, 9:28 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

You didn't say whether or not you will be needing a bear can...some places mandate that you do carry one.
If one is required, take this into account when selecting your pack as a size 40 might not work.
Something in the 50 - 60 liter size is a good starting place.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 06 2013, 9:43 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you are patient on packs you can find a sale - I bought my Osprey Aether 60 - back in 2010 and it was a leftover 2009. Got it for $114 at a local gear shop. I also have a Golite Peak (The smaller Jam) - Golite had a nice sale and I had tried a friends Jam for size. Load it up and then walk around for 20 minutes in the store with each pack. You will then know the right pack for you. It is different for everyone. The thing to consider is you currently have short trips. If you enjoy yourself do you see yourself getting a larger pack down the road? Packs are completely different when loaded up and adjusted properly. Empty they all feel fine.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 08 2013, 1:09 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Nov. 04 2013, 10:53 pm)
QUOTE
You've started at the wrong end.

Throw out everything you've learned and go try on packs in person with your gear (or the same volume and weight). A pack is like a pair of shoes. Each one fits your back differently. Narrow it down to three packs that fit you and fit your gear. Your pack will pick itself.

Best advice I've read when choosing a pack. Will keep this in mind when I get to buy myself a bigger pack for those longer and more challenging treks. Since I only do day hikes, am content with an Osprey Talon 22. It's more of a biker's pack but works well for me.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 08 2013, 2:02 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Starbreaker @ Nov. 05 2013, 7:41 pm)
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[quote=Tigger,Nov. 04 2013, 10:53 pm....I still prefer external over internal, but that's another debate...

+1 to all the "try it on" advice......including putting pack on, and taking it off a few times....while there, try on an external frame.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 08 2013, 3:58 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The Osprey site says that this pack is meant to carry 50-60 pounds optimally. Is that a realistic figure for you? My full winter pack with 2 liters of water and food hovers around 40. Nothing but my trekking poles outside. It's a 50L, and I can have a hard time filling it up.

I just wonder, it being your first pack and all, if you wouldn't be buying a little much for what you may have planned.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 14 2013, 5:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

And of course, the one post OP isn't back to even comment on it. Didn't hear what she wanted to hear I suppose.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 28 2013, 3:30 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Before you spend big bucks, take a look at the ILBE designed Arctryx and made by Propper.  You can see them on Amazon at

http://www.amazon.com/gp....ion=new

Or ebay at

http://www.ebay.com/itm....7391e2b

This pack is a beast.  You can compress it for short trips, or expand/add to it for expeditions and it will last forever. And you can't beat the cost, somewhere around $65-75.00 depending on if you try it on from Amazon or ebay.

The next closest pack similar to this is the  Arc'teryx Naos 85 for about $700.00 at :

http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Naos-85&language=EN

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 29 2013, 9:19 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gifford @ Nov. 28 2013, 2:30 pm)
QUOTE
Before you spend big bucks, take a look at the ILBE designed Arctryx and made by Propper.  You can see them on Amazon at

http://www.amazon.com/gp....ion=new

Or ebay at

http://www.ebay.com/itm....7391e2b

This pack is a beast.  You can compress it for short trips, or expand/add to it for expeditions and it will last forever. And you can't beat the cost, somewhere around $65-75.00 depending on if you try it on from Amazon or ebay.

The next closest pack similar to this is the  Arc'teryx Naos 85 for about $700.00 at :

http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Naos-85&language=EN

Giff

Thought this was a joke, but no one has responded. Maybe it's just the holiday, and lack of traffic. OP was clearly female, this suggestion is for a pack that weighs about 1/3 what all my usual gear total is. Awesome pack, however - for a largish gorilla.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 29 2013, 12:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gabby @ Nov. 29 2013, 6:19 am)
QUOTE

(Gifford @ Nov. 28 2013, 2:30 pm)
QUOTE
Before you spend big bucks, take a look at the ILBE designed Arctryx and made by Propper.  You can see them on Amazon at

http://www.amazon.com/gp....ion=new

Or ebay at

http://www.ebay.com/itm....7391e2b

This pack is a beast.  You can compress it for short trips, or expand/add to it for expeditions and it will last forever. And you can't beat the cost, somewhere around $65-75.00 depending on if you try it on from Amazon or ebay.

The next closest pack similar to this is the  Arc'teryx Naos 85 for about $700.00 at :

http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Naos-85&language=EN

Giff

Thought this was a joke, but no one has responded. Maybe it's just the holiday, and lack of traffic. OP was clearly female, this suggestion is for a pack that weighs about 1/3 what all my usual gear total is. Awesome pack, however - for a largish gorilla.

11 pounds for a pack?!  Seriously?  Yeah, this guy has to be joking.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 29 2013, 11:05 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gifford @ Nov. 28 2013, 3:30 pm)
QUOTE
Before you spend big bucks, take a look at the ILBE designed Arctryx and made by Propper.  You can see them on Amazon at

http://www.amazon.com/gp....ion=new

Or ebay at

http://www.ebay.com/itm....7391e2b

This pack is a beast.  You can compress it for short trips, or expand/add to it for expeditions and it will last forever. And you can't beat the cost, somewhere around $65-75.00 depending on if you try it on from Amazon or ebay.

The next closest pack similar to this is the  Arc'teryx Naos 85 for about $700.00 at :

http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Naos-85&language=EN

Giff

My local surplus city has these for $50.  I was originally intrigued - "designed by Arcteryx, made by Propper" here in the USA.  Then I picked it up - easily weighs half my total kit.  Nice looking pack, you could lighten it up a little with a knife & some time, but I'll spend my $50 somewhere else.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 1:25 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gabby @ Nov. 29 2013, 9:19 am)
QUOTE

(Gifford @ Nov. 28 2013, 2:30 pm)
QUOTE
Before you spend big bucks, take a look at the ILBE designed Arctryx and made by Propper.  You can see them on Amazon at

http://www.amazon.com/gp....ion=new

Or ebay at

http://www.ebay.com/itm....7391e2b

This pack is a beast.  You can compress it for short trips, or expand/add to it for expeditions and it will last forever. And you can't beat the cost, somewhere around $65-75.00 depending on if you try it on from Amazon or ebay.

The next closest pack similar to this is the  Arc'teryx Naos 85 for about $700.00 at :

http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?model=Naos-85&language=EN

Giff

Thought this was a joke, but no one has responded. Maybe it's just the holiday, and lack of traffic. OP was clearly female, this suggestion is for a pack that weighs about 1/3 what all my usual gear total is. Awesome pack, however - for a largish gorilla.

Largish Gorilla? Seriously?

And what is your support for that 11lb weight quote?

I just weighed mine, 8lbs exactly. This matches Marine Corps specs and other reviewers  such as http://www.shtfblog.com/the-ilbe-tango-arcteryx-main-backpack/  But to match apples to apples, the only other comparable Arctryx pack is the Naos, which is 7.3lbs and not 1/10 as durable or versatile. On the same side of the pack spectrum  my son weighed his K2 and it was 10.4 lbs.

Wow I am not sure, but I think I should be flattered!

I am looking closely at my 7th decade of life from the vantage point of my whopping 6'1" frame that stomps the ground with its massive 180lbs, and I carry a full 3-4 days worth of gear on terrain that varies from up in the North Cascades and down to the Willamette Pass  with no trouble and simply enjoy the outings.

Of course since I use stripped down MREs and don't carry the 2-3+ lbs of stove and fuel it evens out.

Perhaps it is just the suspension system on the Gen2 ILBE. Or perhaps I am just in great shape! (Me and Tony the Tiger . . . most of you probably were not even born when he was advertising Frosted Flakes.)

On the other hand. . . it just may be that this new younger generation has no staying power!

Oh, I read one of the reviews where a dad bought two of these for his sons who are in the Boy Scouts, to take backpacking. Some of you can't even keep with Boy Scouts? 13 and 14 year olds? Seriously?

Ok, I guess I will take it as a compliment!

ROFL
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 2:06 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I used to carry a 120 lb pack.




Even I think your suggestion is ridiculous.


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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 10:49 am Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Tigger @ Nov. 30 2013, 2:06 am)
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I used to carry a 120 lb pack.




Even I think your suggestion is ridiculous.

This from a man who used to carry a 120lb pack?  Even on my most "ridiculous day" I knew better than to do that!

Just out of curiosity, how much did the pack you are using in that pic weigh?

Llamas FTW.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 12:18 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think I read "5 lbs" somewhere on one of your links, Gifford. Still, "8 lbs" is as much as my "entire kit".

But no ill will intended. I just thought you might have inserted something about the entire thread belonging on the "ultra light" forum. :^)

Let me use a short (hopefully! :^> ...I'm "chatty", but you probably didn't notice!) anecdote to illustrate my take on this:

I labored for a month and a half to replace 8 posts in a length of fencing (8 foot privacy fence, put in some 13 years ago) year before last. It "blew over" while I was in Hawaii in May of that year. My upper body strength is lousy, always has been despite whatever I've done to improve it (read: not much), and, with age, the rest of my body is slowly succumbing to time - and arthritis. Mind, I put those posts in in the month of July (97 to 100 degrees, daily), in little 30 minute bursts of copious sweat and accompanying groans and such.

Yesterday morning, quite unexpectedly, a guy named "Pete" showed up in my back neighbor's yard and starting knocking out pickets. I had figured to do this section of fence as well - someday - but here he was. Guy was an ex-Seal, is young and "well-structured", and, also, an all-around nice guy: soft-spoken but very firmly focused, as you might expect, I guess.

He put in all 8 rotted posts in something like 6 hours, without much sweat. Dug all the holes, removing the old concrete (assisted by my heavy iron pike, I might add), and setting, very ably and in a very craftsmanlike way, the new posts - in place, and moving the existing rails and pickets [i]bodily in order to get enough space.[/i]

It was, of course, about 35 degrees when I first heard him hammering and went out. But, despite the difference in temperatures, this is the difference between 30s (I guess) and "in shape" and late 60s and "out of shape". A lot depends, as we all know. This, I suspect, is the origin of "HYOH".

I asked the guy about the ILBE, BTW - just in conversation. His reply: "most uncomfortable damned device ever designed by man." But, YMMV - of course.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 2:04 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I am going to show my age here, and my basic techno-barbarian background. What do HYOH and YMMV stand for?

While I would love to go out for a 3-4 day trip with only 8lbs on my back, I just don't ever see that happening. I usually carry that much weight just in water, and that is when I know I will be able to find more water at some point along the trip.

As far as age is concerned. How oh how I would like to be just 60 again!  I keep reminding myself, getting old is NOT for sissies!

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 2:40 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gifford @ Nov. 30 2013, 1:04 pm)
QUOTE
I am going to show my age here, and my basic techno-barbarian background. What do HYOH and YMMV stand for?

While I would love to go out for a 3-4 day trip with only 8lbs on my back, I just don't ever see that happening. I usually carry that much weight just in water, and that is when I know I will be able to find more water at some point along the trip.

As far as age is concerned. How oh how I would like to be just 60 again!  I keep reminding myself, getting old is NOT for sissies!

Giff

You're conversing with someone who, although an "ex-geek" programmer, is very much less than familiar with all the geeky online lingo, but the two terms are pretty much interchangeable:

HYOH = "Hike Your Own Hike"
YMMV =  "Your Mileage May Vary"

They both have to do with the idea that your experience is probably different than mine, your body (and your mind) and mine probably have different needs/wants/capabilities, and there's really no use in my attempting to dictate "solutions" or "answers" to someone else who has a different experience and different perceptions of things in general. IOW (in other words), take any advice you get (or give) with a grain of salt (GOS?) and use your own relative experience and such as a guide. (You can see why someone might have wanted to "encapsulate" the sentiment - there are some among us who can't say anything in less than 500 words. They are evil, BTW (by the way), and should be stamped out mercilessly!)

You would have caught on to these eventually, because they're used all the time on here - and elsewhere.
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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 3:54 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Gifford, the picture I took is the 120 lb pack (or should I say...two packs). It is a Golite Gust on top of an Eureka Eagle back when External packs were still somewhat in style.

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 3:59 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

OK, so how much do the two packs weigh when added together ?

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PostIcon Posted on: Nov. 30 2013, 9:23 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE


(Gifford @ Nov. 30 2013, 12:59 pm)
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OK, so how much do the two packs weigh when added together ?

Giff

Well my Golite Gust weighed 1 lb, literally and I'd have to guess the Eagle to be at 5 lbs but that's just a rough guess. It's been quite a few years since I owned it and can't find any specs online. That's a total of 6 lbs with just shy of 10,000 cubic inches internal space. Why any normal person would want to carry that is beyond me let alone the OP (Original poster).

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 01 2013, 8:31 pm Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'm the one (not Gabby) who mentioned 11lbs.  That was the shipping weight, so admittedly probably a bit more than the actual pack weight.

Still.  My pack weighs under 4lbs and can carry over 40.  Since I have no desire to ever carry more than that again, and prefer to start even week-long trips with under 35, I'm obviously not impressed with even a 8-lb pack.  Though I might be able to use one of those as a bivvy, which would be great mutli-use planning.

I'm glad that at 70 or whatever you can still carry huge packs.  I carried 50+ in my 20s and 30s and don't care to do so any more.  I also don't NEED to, though if we did more extended desert hikes I could see it being necessary on occasion.  And I suspect I'll be able to keep hiking more years if I don't stress the body that much, since some parts are giving out.


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